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Full text of "How to see Switzerland, a practical guide"

C HOW TO 5EX TV 

OWITZOMl) 



A PRACTICAL GUIDE 



BY 

FREDERICK DOSSENBACH 



II 



G. E. STECHERT & CO., Publishers 

(ALFRED HAFNER) 
LONDON NEW YORK 



COPYRIGHT, 1922, BY 
FREDERICK DOSSENBACH 



All rights reserved 



Printed in the United States of America 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

A GLIMPSE OF SWITZERLAND'S HISTORY AND HER 

RELATIONSHIP TO THE U. S. A 1 

PLANNING THE TOUR 13 

Steamer passage, funds, passports, customs, cur- 
rencies of European countries. 

TRANSATLANTIC PASSENGER SERVICES 17 

OCEAN DISTANCES 18 

TIME WHEN IT is NOON IN NEW YORK 19 

How TO REACH SWITZERLAND FROM PORT OF 

DEBARKATION AND OTHER EUROPEAN POINTS 20 
HINTS FOR THE TOUR IN SWITZERLAND 22 

Season, expenses, hotel accommodation, hotel 
telegraph code, hotel tariffs, railroads and 
tickets, baggage, railroad fares, mountain rail- 
roads and fares, customs, money, telegraph and 
postal service rates, diligence and auto-bus 
service, walking and mountaineering, automo- 
biling, tennis, fishing, golfing, boating, informa- 
tion offices. 

WINTER IN SWITZERLAND 130 

LIST OF WINTER SPORT CENTRES 137 

CLIMATE 138 

THE MINERAL SPRINGS AND SPAS . 140 



viii ILLUSTRATIONS 

BOBSLEIGHING AT ST. MORITZ 135 

A HOCKEY MATCH AT DAVOS 142 

THE CRESTA RUN, ST. MORITZ 143 

LUCERNE WITH THE PILATUS 150 

THE AXENSTRASSE SKIRTING THE LAKE OF 

LUCERNE 151 

LINTHAL, VIEW TOWARDS THE KLAUSEN PASS. . 166 
WASSEN, WITH THE ELECTRIC GOTHARD EXPRESS 167 

A VIEW OF ZURICH WITH THE LIMMAT 188 

THE TAMINA GORGE AT RAGAZ 189 

A PASTURE IN THE UPPER ENGADINE 204 

MOUNTAIN CLIMBING NEAR DAVOS 205 

CASTLE OF TARASP IN THE LOWER ENGADINE 220 

SKI-ING ON THE CHATZEHUBEL, ADELBODEN 221 

ORIA, NEAR LUGANO 228 

THE MONASTERY OF BIGORIS NEAR LUGANO 229 

OPEN AIR PARLIAMENT AT SCHADDORF NEAR 

ALTDORF 236 

BURNING OF THE BOOGG AT ZURICH 237 



INTRODUCTION 

Mark Twain, in his "tramp abroad" remarked of the lure 
of the Alps : 

"I met dozens of people who had come from far coun- 
tries and roamed through the Swiss Alps year after year, but 
they could not explain why; they had come since because they 
could not help it, and they should keep on coming, while they 
lived, for the same reason. 

"Others came nearer formulating what they felt; they 
said they could find rest and peace nowhere else when they 
were troubled; all frets and worries and chafings sank to 
sleep in the presence of the benignant serenity of the Alps; 
the Great Spirit of the mountain breathed his own peace upon 
their hurt minds and sore hearts, and healed them ; they could 
not think base thoughts or do mean and sordid things here 
before the visible throne of God." 

And as there is a right and a wrong way to do one's 
work, so must we acknowledge that there is also a right and 
a wrong way to seek one's pleasures. Travel, when carefully 
planned, is decidedly one of the most beneficial recreations 
both for body and mind, but a trip taken at random with the 
sole purpose of "doing" a certain part of the Globe produces 
nothing but a bewildering mass of hazy impressions, a totally 
tired out system and very often a budget of expenses which 
are quite out of keeping with the enjoyment derived. 

As a trip to Europe, however brief, is never complete 
without a visit to proverbially beautiful Switzerland, this book 
is written, not with the intention to replace any other guide 
book, but with the specific purpose in mind to be of practical 
assistance to the average American traveler of to-day, show- 



X INTRODUCTION 

ing him in a concise and comprehensive form "How to See 
Switzerland" within the limit of the time at his disposal. 

No preference is given to any particular place or hotel; 
the strictest impartiality has been observed in the indications 
given which are simply destined to act as a pilot to the indi- 
vidual traveler. 

This book should, therefore, respond to a real need and if 
it does, its purpose is accomplished. May it become your 
indispensable guide and ever helpful friend! 

THE AUTHOR. 



A GLIMPSE OF SWITZERLAND'S HISTORY AND 

HER RELATIONSHIP TO THE UNITED 

STATES OF AMERICA 

HER HISTORY, PAST AND PRESENT 

THE history of Switzerland teems with the records of 
valiant men and a sturdy people who never acknowl- 
edging the divine right of Kings or of any other potentate 
stood for freedom with unfaltering courage many times in 
the face of desperate odds. Their cause has rested upon the 
sure foundation of their rugged Alps and their inspiration 
has been drawn from the vastness of God's open air. 

The country is believed to have been first peopled by the 
Rhaetians who were driven from the plains to the mountains 
by the Helvetians, a Celtic tribe. The latter were conquered 
by the Romans in 58 B.C. and the Rhaetians were subdued in 
15 B.C. The Romans constructed good military roads over 
the great St. Bernard to Basle and over the Julier, Septimer 
and Spliigen in the Grisons to Bregenz and Basle. The chief 
settlements were Aventicum (Avenches) in the Canton of 
Vaud, Vindonissa near Brugg (Canton of Argovie), Augusta 
Rauracorum (Augst) near Basle, and Curia Rhaetorum 
(Coire) in the Grisons. Helvetia, as the country was then 
called, enjoyed a flourishing trade under Roman domination, 
then came the period of the great migrations from the north, 
when Huns, Burgundians, Alemans and Ostrogoths swept 
through the peaceful valleys of the Alps and settled in suc- 
cession in different parts of the country. The races became 
intermingled and in the Swiss of to-day we have a mixture of 

1 



2 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Celtic and Alemannic blood, m which also Rhaetian, Burgunr 
dian and Roman elements are mingled. 

In the course of time ancient Helvetia was to a great 
extent turned into a province of the Holy Roman Empire and 
was ruled by bailiffs or by the nobles of the neighborhood. 
In the beginning of the 12th Century the Hapsburgs came 
into prominence, having already acquired considerable power 
and many riches. They became counts in Upper Alsace and 
inherited moreover extensive property in the Aargau and what 
was then known as the Ziirichgau. Later they also gained 
power in Central Switzerland. Under Emperor Rudolf of 
Hapsburg (1273-1291) these districts enjoyed great freedom, 
however, but his son Albrecht did not show any desire to fol- 
low in the footsteps of his father. Thus on the first day of 
August, 1291, the three lands of Uri, Schwyz and Unterwalden 
formed their first league for mutual safety and the protection 
of liberty against the Hapsburgs. 

With the intention of punishing them for this act, Albrecht 
departed from the usual custom of naming a nobleman as 
their protector or bailiff and despatched to Switzerland two 
men of his own on whom he could rely to carry out his plans. 
Persecution began, taxes were increased and the smallest 
offences were punished by heavy fines and imprisonment. 

Into this period fits the ever-inspiring story of William 
Tell, the Swiss national hero, the man who was obliged by 
the tyrant Gessler to shoot an apple from the head of one of 
his two beloved boys. Tell complied with the wish, but 
reserved at the same time another arrow for his tormentor. 
The latter noticed it and upon being questioned, Tell was 
frank enough to admit the truth, whereupon Gessler ordered 
that Tell be bound and taken along on Gessler's boat to a 
dark dungeon. But a storm rose on the lake and when the 
little craft was in danger of being swallowed by the high 
waves, Gessler commanded Tell to be freed in order that he 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 3 

who was not only known as a fine marksman, but also as a 
splendid oarsman could guide the boat to safety. 

Soon Tell was piloting the little craft towards the shore, 
but when he had reached a favorable spot from where he 
could gain land, he leaped ashore and pushed the boat back 
into the turmoil of the waters. A little later, in the Hollow 
Road of Kiissnacht on the Lake of Lucerne, he concealed 
himself and when Gessler and his knights came along, Tell's 
never-failing arrow killed the tyrant. 

When the courageous little people could endure such 
indignities no longer three of their representatives, Walter 
Fiirst, Werner Stauffacher and Arnold von Melchtal, met and 
discussed the situation and they decided that each of the 
three should go back to his own part of the country to con- 
sult with the best and bravest men of his district and see 
what could be done for liberty and safety. On the seventh 
day of November, 1307, they met on the classic spot now 
known as the Riitli a quiet meadow on the borders of the 
Lake of the Four Cantons, opposite Brunnen. Each of the 
three men had brought with him ten other men, tried and true, 
and together they solemnly swore that they would "faithfully 
live and die for the rights of the people, that they would 
suffer no injustice, but also commit none, and that they would 
undertake and carry out everything together, as one man." 

In 1308 Emperor Albrecht was murdered by his own 
nephew, whose heritage he had withheld, and for a brief 
period the three little states now known as the Waldstatten, 
enjoyed comparative freedom, as Emperor Henry VII, who 
was an opponent of the Hapsburgs, had conferred a charter 
of independence on them. He died, however, during a cam- 
paign in Italy, and Austria once more began to exercise her 
tyranny on them. 

Commanded by Duke Leopold of Austria, a son of the 
murdered Albrecht, a force of 20,000 men marched towards 



4 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Morgarten, in Schwyz, on November 15, 1315. To meet this 
army of trained soldiers 1300 men from the three Cantons 
stationed themselves near the hill of Morgarten. Fifty men, 
who had been banished from Schwyz and who were anxious 
to win back their good name, asked to act as the advanced 
post, and as soon as they saw the enemy approach they started 
the attack by rolling down great masses of rock upon the 
invaders. This created a general confusion which was quickly 
used by the main body of men. With their long pikes and 
terrible halberds, they soon found themselves masters of the 
situation, and in less than two hours 1500 men of the Austrian 
army were either killed or drowned in the Lake of Zug, while 
the remainder fled, terrorized from the enfuriated peasants. 
Duke Leopold himself could barely be saved by his attendants 
and he returned to Winterthur that night "pale, ashamed and 
in despair." 

Switzerland's first big battle against Austria ended thus 
in a glorious victory for the 1300 untrained peasants and a 
crushing defeat for the arrogant enemy! 

Seventy-one years passed before the next great battle in 
the Swiss struggle for independence, but during this time five 
new members were added to the Confederation: Lucerne, 
Zurich, Glarus, Zug and Berne. Each of these was first 
obliged to overcome the opposition of Austria and a sullen 
conflict was consequently steadily waged. At last Lucerne 
started open hostilities by destroying the Austrian strong- 
holds in its vicinity, liberating the peasantry from the control 
of the enemy's officials and admitting them as fellow-citizens 
to the enjoyment of their own charter. 

"To once and for all finish with those rough peasants," 
Duke Leopold III, a nephew of the Leopold who lost at Mor- 
garten, began to assemble a big army near Brugg. A number 
of German nobles went also to his aid and the Duke of Milan 
even sent 200 cavalrymen as a reinforcement. The first 






HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 5 

attack by the hostile army was planned for Lucerne and on 
that account the invaders marched from Brugg via Zofingen 
to Sursee, then on July 9, 1386, on towards Sempach. Duke 
Leopold felt so certain of his victory that he even took the 
trouble to ride in person before the walls of Sempach in order 
to show the citizens the rope which the Austrians had brought 
with them "to hang up the Swiss." 

While he ordered his infantry to surround the little city 
he proceeded with his cavalry to a hill in order to cut off any 
Swiss who might attempt to come to the rescue. Very soon 
his look-out reported the approach of a Swiss army, number- 
ing about 1500 men from Lucerne, Uri, Schwyz and Unter- 
walden, and the Austrian cavalry, led by the Duke, made ready 
for the battle. Leopold quickly realized that the only way to 
avert disaster was to meet the enemy on foot and calling on 
his followers to do likewise, he dismounted. The knights 
rallied round him; and while the Switzers were on their knees 
praying to God and the Blessed Virgin that they might deliver 
them from their enemies, the Duke and his men formed into 
a solid square and awaited attack in a formation which gave 
them a decided advantage. 

With their shields locked together, the Austrian force 
presented a wall of steel to their foes; and with their long 
spears advanced they could prevent the Swiss, who were 
armed with morgensterns, axes and halberds, from approach- 
ing them closely. And though again and again the men of 
Lucerne attacked steadily and with great courage, the Aus- 
trians were immovable. Finally the Confederates suffered a 
severe reverse when the Lucerne leader, the aged Pierre von 
Gundoldingen fell mortally wounded and it is difficult to say 
how the battle would have ended, but for the heroic self- 
sacrifice of Arnold von Winkelried of Unterwald, who by a 
deed which has won him immortal fame, opened a way 
through the ranks of the enemy. 



6 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

"Confederates," he said, "that rank must be broken; and 
I am going to open a path for you. In the name of God, I 
commend my wife and my children to your safe keeping." 

With these words he rushed forward upon the Austrian 
lances, clasped as many of them as he could gather in his arms 
and fell, pierced with many wounds. And his comrades 
understood; they dashed over the hero's body and sprang 
through the breach he had made. Their weapons now dealt 
deadly blows right and left, while the Austrians could not 
handle their spears any more at such close quarters. In a few 
minutes the ground was strewn with Austrian dead and even 
the knights were thoroughly demoralized. With superb 
courage Duke Leopold strove to rally his men, but he achieved 
nothing and fell dead in the thickest of fight. While the 
Duke and his fallen noblemen were buried at Konigsfelden, 
the fallen Swiss heroes were taken to their respective homes 
and a general grave on the battlefield received the remainder 
of the dead, friend and foe. A chapel was erected over their 
burial place and on the 9th of July every year a celebration 
is held in memory of this eventful day. 

The glorious victory of Sempach had now greatly endan- 
gered Austrian prestige, while the Swiss in return were 
encouraged to strike boldly for their rights. However, the 
enemy's revengeful spirit was not curbed as yet and less than 
two years later, i.e., on April 9, 1388, a third decisive battle 
was fought at Nafels, in the Canton of Glarus, which had 
joined the Confederation in 1352. The Glarus people had 
previously conquered the Austrian stronghold at Wesen, but 
one night in February, 1388, a few inhabitants of the city, who 
stood on the side of the enemy, secretly admitted Austrian 
soldiers within their walls and as a result 31 confederates, 
principally men of Glarus, who were stationed there as 
guards, were killed in their beds. 

The Glarus people now asked the confederates for assist- 






HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 7 

ance, but finding the time of the year inappropriate for a con- 
quest of the fortress they postponed an attack until later. All 
overtures for peace were rejected by the Austrians and an 
army of 6,000 men approached Glarus on April 9, 1388. The 
Glarners had fortified their valley with a so-called Letzi wall 
directly before Nafels and 350 men were stationed there for 
the defence. The superior number of the enemy obliged them, 
however, to retreat up the valley where they finally posted 
themselves on a slope of loose rolling stones, where the 
hostile cavalry could find no foothold. Volleys of stones 
caused great confusion among the horses, and the confeder- 
ates, taking advantage of the same, were able to chase the 
enemy into a wild flight. History relates that the Glarners 
had to repulse eleven attacks, in memory of which there are 
eleven memorial stones on the battlefield, known as the 
Rautifelder. 

And since those early struggles, Switzerland fought 
fiercely and unfalteringly against many odds to maintain her 
liberty and independence until following the Napoleonic wars, 
at the Congress of Vienna in 1815, the European Powers 
France, Great Britain, Russia, Portugal, Prussia and Austria 
formally and authentically acknowledged that the perpetual 
"neutrality and inviolability of Switzerland and its indepen- 
dence from all foreign influence are in the best interests of 
the policy of the whole of Europe." Her political indepen- 
dence was then assured. 

To-day Switzerland's Constitution is similar to that of the 
United States. Since 1848 she has been a federal state con- 
sisting of a central Authority, the "Bund," and twenty-two 
states, the "Cantons." These are the cantons and their respec- 
tive admittance into the Federation: 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Admitted Present 

Into the Federation Population 
URI. .................. 1 These three cantons f... 23,963 

&: ::::::::: [*** 0ri *H :: 

(Divided into Obwalden [[ Federation under) 
and Nidwalden) J the "Vow of 1291" I 

LUCERNE ....................... 1332 .......... 176,659 

ZURICH ........................ 1351 .......... 538,580 

UG ............................ 1352 .......... 31,630 

GLARUS ........................... 1352 .......... 33,892 

BERNE ........................... 1353 .......... 675,731 

FRIBOURG ........................ 1481 .......... 142,965 

SOLEURE ......................... 1481 .......... 130,615 

SCHAFFHAUSEN ....... ............. I5OI .......... $0,478 

BASLE 

(Divided into two half-cantons: 

Baselstadt and Baselland) ....... 1501 .......... 223,055 

APPENZELL 

(Divided into two half-cantons: 

Appenzell Ausser-Rhoden and 

Appenzell Inner Rhoden ......... 1513 .......... 69,978 

ST. GALL ......................... 1803 .......... 295,216 

GRISONS .......................... 1803 .......... 121,188 

AARGAU .......................... 1803 .......... 240,767 

THURGAU ........................ 1803 .......... 135,824 

TICINO .......................... 1803 .......... 152,910 

VAUD ............................ 1803 .......... 31 9,928 

VALAIS .......................... 1815 .......... 126,157 

NEUCHATEL ...................... 1815 .......... 131,483 

GENEVA .......................... 1815 .......... 171,409 

To foreign powers Switzerland presents a united front, 
while her internal policy allows to each Canton a large 
amount of independence. Each of the twenty-two Cantons 
is a sovereign State, but its privileges are nevertheless limited 
by the Federal constitution, particularly as regards legal, mili- 
tary and educational matters. 

The population of the twenty-two Cantons constitute 
together the Swiss Confederation. The highest power is 
exercised by the Parliament, which consists, like in the 
United States, of two Houses; the National Council and the 
Council of States, the former representing the Swiss people 
and the latter the Cantons. The highest administrative 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 9 

authority in Switzerland is the Bundesrat, the Federal Coun- 
cil, composed of seven members, who are elected by the 
Federal Assembly. One of these Federal Councillors is 
elected President and another Vice-President for a term of 
one year. After the expiration of this term the Vice-Presi- 
dent generally becomes President and another member of the 
Federal Council is entrusted with the Vice-Presidency. 

The total area of Switzerland is 15,965 square miles, or 
less than one-third of the State of Florida. The population 
is 3,883,700 souls according to the 1920 census. Three national 
languages are spoken, 2,700,000 have German, 900,000 French, 
and 300,000 Italian as their native tongue. Two millions are 
Protestants and one and one-half million Catholics. 

HER RELATIONSHIP TO THE UNITED STATES 
Switzerland's relationship to the United States dates back 
to the period of the Calvanistic Reformation when a spiritual 
link was forged between Geneva and New England and when 
the Genevese were the counterpart of the Puritans in England 
and the Pilgrims in America. The three groups were guided 
by the same doctrine and the same simple rituals of their 
cult; they adhered to the same stern morals and simple life. 

Besides this origin of religious sympathies, we find a 
mutual influence has existed between the two Republics for 
a century and a half. It was in the year 1828, after his 
travels in Switzerland, that James Fenimore Cooper, the 
American novelist, declared that all liberal-minded and well- 
informed Swiss whom he had encountered were aware of the 
imperfection of the Federal constitution of those days and 
that they were aspiring to a union formed after the principles 
of that of the United States. The Swiss constitution of 1848, 
of which the present fundamental law of 1874 is the natural 
outgrowth, was consequently partially modeled after the 
American constitution of 1789. 



10 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

The Swiss Referendum, however, or vote of the people 
en masse, and the Initiative, empowering the people to demand 
the abrogation or modification of given articles of the Fed- 
eral constitution, as well as the adoption of new formal dispo- 
sitions, which were introduced in 1874, were hardly known 
in this country before 1889, when they started to become a 
generally discussed question. South Dakota was the first 
State which passed a constitutional amendment favoring the 
adoption of the Initiative and the Referendum after the 
Swiss pattern and this amendment having been accepted by 
a popular vote, was embodied in the fundamental law of the 
State in 1898. Oregon was the next to follow and among the 
many prominent men who voiced their opinion on this subject, 
one may quote G. H. Shibley, Director of the American 
Bureau of Political Research, who declared: "the influence 
of the Swiss example on the development of democracy in 
the United States in this era is beyond words to express." 
Thus it is proven that the Swiss followed America's example 
in their constitution of 1848 and the United States in its turn 
has followed Switzerland's example as far as the Initiative 
and Referendum are concerned; the traditional friendship of 
the two nations is based upon the common ideal of liberty and 
democracy. This undoubtedly accounts for the fact that since 
1710, when some 5,000 Swiss emigrated to the New World, the 
United States has been the preferred destination of Helvetian 
emigrants. It is estimated that about 150,000 Swiss left their 
native land between 1887-1914 and that fully 83 per cent, of 
this number came to these shores. Most of them were 
farmers, but the percentage of industrial workers, artisans 
and business people has grown steadily. Of these vast num- 
bers of sons Switzerland has given America, there are many 
who distinguished themselves with brilliant careers in this 
country and among these the names of Albert Gallatin and 
Louis Agassiz will stand out prominently forever. 






HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 11 

With the intention of making a fortune for himself on 
the other side of the Atlantic, Albert Gallatin of prominent 
parentage and university education left his native city of 
Geneva in the year 1780, when he was 19 years old. After his 
arrival he started a very modest grocery trade; a little later 
he gave some French lessons at the College now known as 
Harvard University and after that he acted as interpreter of 
the agent of a foreign bank who had advanced large sums of 
money to the State of Virginia. It was not a lucrative posi- 
tion, but it brought him together with some of the leading 
politicians of the new Republic. 

He then took part in some extensive, but unsuccessful 
real estate dealings during which period he spent several 
months exploring virgin territory. At that time a rumor 
reached Geneva that he had been killed by Indians and the 
cantonal archives actually contain an autograph letter by 
Thomas Jefferson, at that time American Ambassador at 
Paris, reassuring his family in this respect. 

Gallatin became an American citizen in 1785 and in 1790 
he was elected member of the Chamber of Representatives of 
the State of Pennsylvania. From 1794-1801 he was a member 
of Congress at Washington where he distinguished himself 
in such a degree that Jefferson, when he became President in 
1801, chose him for the post of Secretary of the Treasury at 
which he remained until 1813. 

He was the chief negotiator of the treaty of Ghent, 
which ended the war with England in 1814. From 1816-1823 
he was Ambassador of the United States to the court of 
Louis XVIII, during which period he actually declined the 
portfolio of Finance, the presidency of the Bank of the United 
States and several other positions which were as honorable 
as they were lucrative. Against his personal wishes he 
accepted the candidacy for the Vice-Presidency of the United 
States. He withdrew the same, however, soon after, as a 



12 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 






serious illness of the candidate for Presidency Mr. Craw- 
fordchanged the electoral situation entirely. 

In 1826 President Adams sent Gallatin as special U. S. 
Envoy on an important diplomatic mission to London. After 
his return to America in 1827 and up to the time of his death 
in 1849 he devoted himself to the direction of a large New 
York bank, to economical research work, etc. 

Were it not for the fact that the United States Constitu- 
tion bars foreign born citizens from the Presidency, it is 
quite probable that Albert Gallatin, this noteworthy Swiss 
upon whom appreciative America showered so many distinc- 
tions, would have been elevated to that highest post of 
honor the Presidency. 

Not less triumphal was the career of that other Swiss, 
Louis Agassiz, the vaudois naturalist. At the age of 38 he 
arrived in this country in the year 1843 on a scientific mission 
and shortly afterwards he became professor of zoology and 
geology at Harvard University where he remained with few 
interruptions until his death in 1873. His brilliant work in 
the most varied branches of natural history brought him 
universal repute and the memory he left at the great uni- 
versity is such that to-day even the most obscure Swiss are 
assured of an exceptionally cordial welcome at Harvard in his 
honor. 

The foregoing facts illustrate that the two sister Repub- 
lics, Switzerland and the United States, are not only closely 
related as the world's model democracies, but that they truly 
have, as ex-President Wilson said, "common principles of 
life, common ideals and common aspirations." 



PLANNING THE TOUR 

Map out your trip, if possible, before you leave America, or 
at least select your port of debarkation in Europe, then make 
your reservation as far in advance as possible with the 
Steamship Company or Tourist Agent, whose assistance for 
preparing your European trip is most valuable. 

STEAMER PASSAGE 

Accommodation on steamer can be secured in advance on 
payment of a deposit of, as a rule, 25 per cent, of the passage 
money, balance payable three weeks before sailing. Return 
accommodation can also be secured in advance upon payment 
of the required deposit and balance payable before leaving 
America. 

Baggage. On the steamer, each adult passenger is allowed 
20 cubic feet of baggage free. As the steamship companies 
decline liability for loss or damage to baggage beyond the 
amount specified on the steamer ticket, it is highly advisable 
to insure the baggage, which can be done through the steam- 
ship company's offices or their agents. 

Before you board the steamer claim and register your 
"Hold" baggage with the baggagemaster at the pier; same is 
not placed on board before it is claimed by the passenger. 
Packages required on the voyage should be marked 
"Wanted" when sent to the pier. Steamer trunk should not 
exceed 14 inches in height, 2 feet in width and 3 feet in 
length, in order that it may be placed under the berth. 

Bicycles, Motorcycles and Automobiles. Bicycles and 
motorcycles must be crated and are carried at owner's risk 

13 



14 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

only on the steamer. The rate is usually $5 and $25 respec- 
tively, from port of embarkation to port of debarkation. For 
the best ways of shipping your automobile apply to the steam- 
ship company for particulars. 

Deck Chairs and Steamer Rugs. A limited number of deck 
chairs and steamer rugs are carried almost on every steamer. 
Same can be hired at a charge of $1.50 each for the voyage. 

Physician on Board. Every ship carries a physician, whose 
attendance is free in case of outbreak of illness or accident 
on board, but in other cases the physician is allowed to charge 
the regular fee. 

Payments on Board. Money paid to the purser or any 
official on board should be receipted for on the company's 
forms. Passenger may pay under protest, if necessary, 
claiming refund from the company upon landing, and the 
claim will surely be met by the company if upon investigation 
same is found justified. 

FUNDS 

Letters of Credit and Traveler's Cheques are the modern 
and most economical way of carrying funds. They combine 
both safety and convenience. Traveler's cheques are, as a 
rule, issued in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100 and are 
readily accepted by the steamship companies, railroads, hotels 
and shopkeepers. On account of the fluctuating exchange, 
however, it is recommended to cash them at banks. 

PASSPORTS 

At the time this book is written, all travelers, regardless of 
nationality, must provide themselves with a passport of their 
respective countries. Citizens of the United States should 
apply to the Department of State in Washington, D. C, or to 
a clerk of a Federal or State Court having authority to 
naturalize aliens. Citizens of other countries must apply to 






HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 15 

their respective Consuls. While these passport requirements 
may seem annoying at the first glance, they are in fact a 
protection for the traveler himself, as every tourist should 
really be in possession of an authoritative document of identi- 
fication for an emergency. In this respect the passport serves 
its good purpose. 

American citizens intending to visit Switzerland must, 
therefore, be in possession of a passport, but same does not 
need to be vised by a Swiss Consul, which formality was 
formerly required. 

CUSTOMS 

In practically all countries no merchandise is allowed to 
enter free of duty. The customs officials, however, are usu- 
ally liberal in the performance of their duty with tourists, 
and very often, if the well known question, "Have you any- 
thing to declare?" is answered in the negative the baggage is 
passed almost without examination. It is advisable, in order 
to avoid trouble, to be perfectly frank with the customs 
officials. If you have anything that you are in doubt as to 
whether or not it is dutiable, tell the Customs Inspector and 
you will, in the end, be better off for having done so, as he 
may exercise with the latitude which the law allows him. 

It is impossible to give full information as to the customs 
regulations and examinations, the practice varying according 
to the frontier and even to the train. It may be said, however, 
that all baggage, whether registered or not, is examined at 
the frontier stations of each country (port of debarkation) 
and again at the Swiss frontier. Passengers have to person- 
ally attend these examinations. If no one appears for the 
baggage, same is retained by the respective customs authori- 
ties at the frontier. (See page 83.) 



CURRENCIES OF EUROPEAN COUNTRIES AND 

THEIR NOMINAL EQUIVALENT AT PAR IN 

UNITED STATES DOLLARS 

(.All these rates are subject to exchange fluctuations') 

NOMINAL EQUIVALENT 

AT PAR 
COUNTRY CURRENT COIN IN U. S. DOLLARS 

Austria Crown 0.203 

Belgium Franc 0.193 

Bulgaria Lev 0.193 

Czechoslovakia Crown 0.203 

Denmark Kroner 0.268 

Finland Finnish Mark 0.193 

France Franc 0.193 

Germany Mark 0.238 

Greece Gold Drachma 0.193 

Hungary Crown 0.203 

Iceland Same as Denmark .... 0.268 

Italy Lira 0.193 

Jugoslavia Crown 0.203 

Luxembourg Franc 0.193 

Malta Same as United 

Kingdom 4.8665 

Netherlands Florin or Guilder 0.402 

Norway Kroner 0.268 

Poland Polish Mark 0.238 

Portugal Gold Milreis 1.08 

Roumania Lei 0.193 

Russia Rouble 0.515 

Spain Gold Peseta 0.193 

Sweden Kroner 0.268 

Switzerland Franc 0.193 

United Kingdom Pound Sterling 4.8665 

Turkey Gold Pound 4-40 



TRANSATLANTIC STEAMER SERVICES TO 
NORTHERN EUROPEAN PORTS 



PROM 


LINE 


REGULAR SERVICES TO 


New York. 


American. 




New York 




burg. 


New York 
New York 


Baltic- America 
Cunard 


Danzig. Libau and Hamburg. 
Plymouth, Cherbourg, Southamp- 


New York 


French Line 


ton, Liverpool, London, Ham- 
burg. 
Havre, also to Hamburg and to 


New York. 


Holland- America 


Bordeaux. 
Boulogne and Rotterdam. 


New York 
New York. 


Norwegian-American. . . 
North German Lloyd 


Bergen, Stavanger, Christiansand 
and Christiania. 


New York. . . 


Red Star 


Plymouth, Cherbourg and Antwerp. 


New York 


Royal Mail Steam 
Packet 


Cherbourg Southampton and Ham- 


New York 
New York. 


Scandinavian- America n 


burg. 
Christiansand, Christiania, Copen- 
hagen and Warnemunde. 
Gothenburg, Malm 6 Stockholm 


New York. . . 


United States 


and Helsingfors. 
Plymouth, Boulogne, London, 


New York. 


United American 




New York 
New York. 


Hamburg- American .... 
White Star 


Plymouth, Cherbourg, Southamp- 


Philadelphia. . . 
Philadelphia . 


American 

Red Star 


ton, Queenstown, Liverpool. 
Liverpool. 
Antwerp. 


Boston. 


Leyland 




Boston 


Cunard 


Liverpool. 


Boston. 


White Star 


Liverpool. 


Portland, Me.. 
Montreal. 


White Star- Dominion. . 
Allan . 


Liverpool. 
Liverpool, also to London, 


Montreal. 


Canadian Pacific 


Liverpool, Southampton, Glasgow. 


Montreal 
Montreal. . . 


White Star-Dominion . . 
Donaldson 


Liverpool. 
Glasgow. 









17 






TRANSATLANTIC STEAMER SERVICES TO 
SOUTHERN EUROPEAN PORTS 



LINE 



SERVICES TO 



Anchor 

Compania Transatlantica . 



Compania Transmediterranea. 

Cunard 

Fabre 



Transatlantica Italiana 

Lloyd Sabaudo 

Navigazione Generale Italiana 

Cosulich 

Portuguese 

White Star 



Naples. 

Barcelona, Cadiz, Conina, Santander, 

Bilbao. 

Cadiz, Barcelona. 

Azores, Gibraltar, Naples and Geneva. 
Palermo, Naples, and Marseilles, also 

Azores, Lisbon and Marseilles. 
Naples and Genoa. 
Naples and Genoa. 
Naples, Genoa and Palermo. 
Naples. 

Azores and Lisbon. 
Azores, Gibraltar, Naples and Genoa. 



OCEAN DISTANCES 
From' New York to European Ports as per Steamer Service 



T0 MILES 

Antwerp 3>3 2 8 

Azores 2,226 

Boulogne sur Mer 3. 1 ? 1 

Bremen 3,5S 

Cherbourg 3,o66 

Dover 3,297 

Fishguard 2,902 

Genoa 4,062 

Gibraltar 3,250 

Glasgow 3,ooo 



TO 



MILES 



Hamburg 3>59<> 

Havre 3,125 

Liverpool 3>o6a 

London 3> 2 S5 

Naples 4,186 

Palermo 4,354 

Plymouth 2,978 

Queenstown 2,814 

Rotterdam 3,29* 

Southampton 3-095 



18 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



19 



TIME WHEN IT IS NOON IN NEW YORK 
SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK CHICAGO 






WESTERN EUROPE 



CENTRAL EUROPE 



EASTERN EUROPE 






CENTRAL EUROPEAN TIME: Switzerland, Denmark, Germany, 

Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, 
Austria, Hungary, Jugo-Slavia, 
Czecho-Slovakia and Sweden. 

WESTERN EUROPEAN TIME: Belgium, France, Great Britain, 

Spain and Portugal. 

EASTERN EUROPEAN TIME: Turkey, Bulgaria, Roumania. 



HOLLAND 



RUSSIA 





HOW TO REACH SWITZERLAND FROM PORT OF 
DEBARKATION AND OTHER EUROPEAN POINTS 



FROM 



To AND 

BEYOND 



ROUTE VIA 



Antwerp . . . 
Boulogne. . . 

Bremen. . . . 

Brussels. . . . 
Cherbourg. . 



Genoa .... 



Hague 

Hamburg.. 
Havre 



London . . 



Marseilles. 
Milan... 



Basle . 
Basle. 



Basle 

Schaffhausen. . 

Basle 

Basle 1 

Berne ' 

Lausanne. . . [ 

Geneva j 

Lucerne 

Geneva , 



Lausanne. . . . 
Berne 



Basle 

Basle 

Basle 

Berne 

Geneva 

Lausanne. . . j 
Basle.. 



Geneva 

Lucerne 

Zurich 



Brussels, Namur, Luxembourg, Metz, Strass- 
bourg. 

Amiens, Laon, Reims, Chalon, Chaumont, 
Belfort. 

Paris, Belfort and Mulhouse. 

Osnabruck, Cologne, Strassbourg. 

Hannover, Frankfort a-M. Stuttgart. 

Same as above. 

See routes from Paris. 



Milan, Chiasso, Lugano (via St. Gothard). 

Allessandira, Nqvara, Arona, Baveno, Domo- 
dossola (via Simplon), Montreux, Lausanne. 

Torino, Modane, Culoz, Bellegarde. 

Allessandria, Novara, Arona, Baveno, Domo- 
dossola (via Simplon), Montreux. 

Allessandria, Novara, Arona, Baveno, Domo- 
dossola (via Simplon), Brigue (via Lotsch- 
berg, Spiez. 

Rotterdam, Antwerp, Brussels, Namur, Lux- 
embourg, Metz, Strassbourg. 

Hannover, Cassel, Frankfort a-M., Strassbourg. 

See routes from Paris. 

Calais, Amiens, Laon, Reims, Chalon, Chau- 
mont, Belfort. 

Boulogne, Laon and as above. 

Ostend, Brussels, Namur, Luxembourg, Strass- 
bourg, Mulhouse. 

Dieppe, Paris, Belfort, Mulhouse. (See routes 
from Paris.) 

Harwich, Antwerp, Brussels. 

Lyons, Macon, Culoz, Bellegarde. 

Chiasso, Lugano (via St. Gothard), Fluelen. 

Chiasso, Lugano (via St. Gothard), Zug. 



20 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



21 



FROM 


TO AND 

BEYOND 


ROUTE VIA 


Milan 


Lausanne 


Arona, Baveno, Domodossola (via Simplon), 




Geneva 


Brigue, Montreux. 
Same as above. 
Arona, Baveno, Domodossola, Brigue (via 


Naples 


Lucerne 


Lotschberg) , Spiez. 
Rome, Florence, Bologna, Milan, Chiasso (via 




Lausanne 
Geneva 


St. Gothard),Fluelen. 
Rome, Florence, Livorno, Genoa, Novara, 
Baveno, Domodossola (via Simplon), Brigue, 
Montreux. 
Same as above. 


Nice 


Lucerne 


San Remo, Genoa, Milan, Chiasso, Lugano (via 




Geneva. 


St. Gothard), Fluelen. 
San Remo, Genoa, Allessandria, Novara, 


Paris 


Basle 


Baveno, Domodossola (via Simplon), Mon- 
treux, Lausanne. 
Marseilles, Lyons, Macon, Culoz, Bellegarde. 
Troyes, Chaumont, Belfort, Mulhouse. 




Lausanne. 


Troyes, Chaumont, Belfort, Delle. 
Dijon Frasne Vallorbe. 




Berne 


Dijon, Frasne, Pontarlier, Neuchatel. 


Rotterdam. . 


Geneva.. . . 
Basle 


Dijon, Bourg, Culoz, Bellegarde. 
Antwerp, Brussels, Namur, Luxembourg, 


Vienna. 


Zurich 


Metz, Strassbourg. 
Hague, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Dusseldorf, 
Cologne, Strassbourg. 
Amsterdam, Utrecht, Dusseldorf, Cologne, 
Strassbourg. 
Salzburg, Innsbruck, Buchs. 












HINTS FOR THE TOUR IN SWITZERLAND 

SEASON 

While the great majority of tourists visit Switzerland 
between middle of July and the end of September, May and 
June are ideal months for those who wish to enjoy besides 
the scenery, the vegetation and Alpine flora at their best. 
Snow disappears in the lowland as early as middle of March, 
so that some of the resorts along the Swiss-Italian lakes and 
the lakes of Geneva, Thun and Lucerne, show signs of lively 
animation during the Spring months. 

Spring, Summer and Autumn in the land of the Alps are 
continued periods of enchantment and providers of endless 
opportunities for every conceivable variety of sports and 
diversions, but Switzerland in Winter too has become the 
rendezvous of the world's leaders in sports and fashions. 
(See page 130.) 

EXPENSES 

The cost of a tour depends, of course, upon the tastes and! 
purse of the individual traveler. Generally speaking, Switz- 
erland is one of the least expensive countries in which to 
spend a holiday. The ordinary tourist's daily expenditure, 
exclusive of special guides, may be estimated at from $4 up. 

HOTEL ACCOMMODATION 

A great comfort to know is that the Swiss hotel service i& 
just as efficient in a small establishment as in the largest 
hostelry. The tourist has every opportunity of finding just 
the sort of hotel which will suit him. In the large and 
magnificent palaces the wealthy guest will find every comfort 
and luxury that he is accustomed to, while those with more 

22 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



23 



modest requirements have every want supplied by the less 
pretentious hotels. The hotel employees are thoroughly capa- 
ble and courteous. Most of them speak English and are thus 
able to inform and direct visitors in a reliable manner. The 
hotels in Switzerland are usually crowded during the tourist 
season and travelers will therefore do well, whenever prac- 
ticable, to order their accommodation in advance. 

Boarding houses or "Pensions" where guests are accepted 
for longer periods at rates of as low as $2 a day cam be 
found almost at every place. 

HOTEL TELEGRAPH-CODE 

The object of this Code is to simplify orders for rooms by 
telegram, and to make them clear and intelligible to the 
receiver. 

The code-words are so chosen, that the receiver of the 
telegram can tell at once from the initial letter how many 
rooms are required, and from the final letter how many beds. 
Thus in "Calde," C is the third letter of the alphabet and 
means 3 rooms, e is the fifth and means 5 beds. 

Orders for rooms should state: 1. The number of rooms, 
stating whether single- or double-bedded; 2. date of arrival; 
3. time of arrival (early morning, day-time or late in the eve- 
ning) ; 4. if possible, whether the order is for one night or 
several days; 5. signature and exact home-address of sender. 

In the event of rooms ordered not being required, counter- 
mand instructions by simply wiring "Cancel." 



room i bed Alba 

double-bedded room ....Alkaduo 

two-bedded room Arab 

room 3 beds Abec 

single rooms Belab 

2 rooms witk 3 beds in all Birac 
a rooms with 4 beds in all Bonad 

3 rooms with 3 beds in all Ciroc 
3 rooms with 4 beds in all Carid 



3 rooms with 5 beds in all . 
3 rooms with 6 beds in all. 

3 rooms with 7 beds in all . 

4 rooms with 4 beds in all . 
4 rooms with 5 beds in all. 
4 rooms with 6 beds in all . 
4 rooms witk 7 beds in all . 
4 rooms with 8 beds in all . 
4 rooms with 9 beds in all . 



.Calde 
,. Caduf 
.Casag 
.Caduf 
.Dainte 
.Danof 
.Dalag 
.Dirich 
.Durbi 



24 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Child's bed Kind (Private bathroom Bat 

Sitting room Sal (Servant's room Strv 



The class of rooms can be indicatedjL^n^ffc of stay: 
by the following additional words:! One night Pas 

^^ t d r roo m m s s di !:': 8 ! 8 ? d ::::K sev era , <,*,, . 

For simply furnished rooms. . .plainlCancelhng rooms Con 



Timt of arrival: Between midnight and 7 A. M Granmat\n 

Between 7 A. M. and midday Mattn 

Between midday and 7 P. M. S*r* 

Between 7 P. M. and midnight (jransera 

All further particulars for which there are no code-words, 
such as day of arrival; whether by railway, steamer, coach, 
motor car or carriage; on what floor the rooms are desired, 
etc., etc., should be telegraphed in the ordinary way. 



HOTEL TARIFFS 

The prices in the list following are given in Swiss Francs 
and are approximate only. For a stay of at least 5 days in 
the same hotel a pension rate is usually granted. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



25 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


4. 
4. 

4.50 
3.00 
4. 
3.50 

/- 

4! 

C LUI __ 

S'. 
7. 
4.50 
6. 

4. 
4. 

3.50 
4. 
3.50 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 

5. 
4. 

3.50 
4.50 


1 
1 

a 

l!75 

2.50 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 

2! 
3. 
1.75 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

2. 

2. 

1.75 
1.75 


g | 


Dinner 


AARAU 


A P Boss dir 


45 
25 

100 
44 
70 
48 
190 
16 
120 

120 
40 
150 

49 
45 

45 
60 
40 
70 
60 
60 
20 

130 
35 

80 
80 


A 

carte 

5. 
4. 
5.-- 
4. 
5.50 
5. 
5. 
5.50 
8. 
4.50 
6. 

4. 
5. 

3.50 
4. 
3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

6. 

5. 

5 


4. 
4.50 

5.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
6.50 
5. 
6. 
6.50 
10. 
5.50 
7. 

5. 
5. 

A m 

4^50 
4. 
5. 
4. 
4. 
4. 

7. 
5. 

5. 
5.50 


Lowen. 


C. Scherz 


ADELBODEN 
Adler & Kursaal 
Alpenrose 


H. Jossi, dir 

G. Aellig 


Beau-Site 
Edelweiss 


H.Moor 
P. Petzold 


Grand Hotel 


E. Gurtner, dir 


Huldi's Privat-Pension.. 
Kulmh6tel Kurhaus 
National 


Familie Huldi 


H. Seewer 


O. Schmid 


Nevada- Palace 
Parkh6tel Bellevue .... 


Richert freres 




Regina H6tel Rondinella 
Sporth&tel Schoenegg & 
Waldpark 


M. Zurbuchen 
Hermann Schmid 


Huldi's H6tel Victoria. . 

AESCHI 
Pension Alpenblick 
Baxen 


Familie Huldi 


Stucker & Zesiger. . 


Baumgarten 




Blumlisalp 


Gebriider Ernst 
T. Ghisla-Gast 
K. Luginbuhl 


Pension Friedegg 
Pension Niesen 


SeebUck 


Jos Waspi 


AlGLE 

Grand H&tel 


W. Niess 
F. Amacker-D6fago 

F. Lombardi 


AlROLO 

Lombard! 


Motta 


A. Motta. , 


4.50 



26 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds || 


Minimum Sates 


1 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


Dinner 


ALTDOKF 




50 
35 
20 

30 
60 

50 
22 

20 
45 
40 

96 

150 
45 
135 
20 
40 
15 
60 
25 
15 

3 
3 


.50 
'.50 

.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

3.50 

6. 
4. 
5.50 
3. 
3.50 
3. 
4. 
3. 
3. 

3. 50 
3.5 


.75 
.80 
.75 

.75 
1.75 

o 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

2.50 
1.75 
2.25 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.7 


3.50 
4. 
3.50 

carte 
4.50 

4. 
4. 

3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

3.50 

6. 

4.50 
6. 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 
4.50 

cart 
4. 


4. 
5. 
4. 

4. 

5. 

4.50 
4.50 

4. 
4 
4. 

4. 

8. 
5.50 
7. 
5. 
5. 
4. 
6. 
4. 
4.50 

4.50 
4. 




Fam Arnold 


Tell 




ALTSTATTEN (Rheintal) 




AMBRI. 
H6tel & Pension Ambri . 

AMDEN 
Kurhaus Alpenhof 


M Croce 




P. Genner 


AMSTEG 


T Furrer-Tresch 


Stern & Post 


Fam. Tresch 




ANDEER 
Fravi. 

ANDERMATT 
Bellevue 
Central-H6tel Fedier. . 
Danioth's Grand H6tel 
Drei Konige 


Pam. Fravi 

A. Muller 

T. Fedier-Christen 
~C Danioth 


Ad. Meyer 
A. & S. Camenzind .... 
G. Wenger-Russi 
Carl Meyer 








Paul Nager 




A. Muller 


APPENZELL 
Hecht 


Max Facchinetti 


ARBON 
Bar, Pension Seebad.. . 


Th Daetwyler 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



27 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


i 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 

1 


AROLLA 
Mont Collon 


J. Anzevui 


99 
60 

60 
40 
45 
100 
115 
80 


4.50 
4. 

6. 
5. 
5. 

6. 


1.75 
1.75 

2. 
>_ 

2! 

2 
2 


4.50 
4. 

5. 
5. 
5. 

5.50 
5. 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 

5 
5'. 
4.50 
5. 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 
5. 
6. 
5. 
5. 
5. 

4. 
4.50 
5.50 


5.50 
5. 

6. 
6. 
6. 

6.50 
6. 
6. 
5. 
5.50 
5. 
5. 

6. 
6. 
5. 
6. 
6. 
5. 
5. 
4.50 
6. 
6. 
6. 
6. 
8. 

4.50 
5.- 




A. Forclaz 


AROSA 


A. Gruber 


Alpensonne 


Trobitzsch & Co 


des Alpes & Villa Zurrer. 


A. M tiller 


P. Wieland, dir 
R. H. Nageli.dir 
F. Buchli, dir 


Sanatorium Arosa 
Arosa-Kulm & 
Waldhaus Arosa A. G. 
Bahnhof 


F. Buchli dir 


68 
30 
36 


5. 

C 


2 _ 
K75 
2 


E. Boksberger 
Carl Schelling 


Beausite-Hohenfels 
Bellevue. 
Bristol & Schweizerhaus. 
Bundner Heilstatte. 


Peter Hold 
A. Schwenke-Halder .... 
Dr. Knoll, Chefarzt. 


60 
35 
11 
50 
45 
25 
25 
35 
36 
15 
14 
60 
80 
40 
60 
100 

65 
15 
15 


5. 
5. 

g 
6. 
4. 
5. 
5. 

<: 

4! 

3.50 
6. 
6. 
5. 
6. 
6. 

3.50 
3. 
4. 


2. 
l'.75 

2_ 
2! 
1.75 
1.75 
2 
1>5 
2. 
1.75 
2_ 
o 
?* 


Eden 


H. Mettier-Pellizari 
H. A. Sieber-Ott 


Excelsior. 




Geschw. Maron 


Pension Gentiana . . . 


F. Caviezel 

Dr. Otto Herwig 
F. Billwiller-Egli 


Sanatorium Dr. Herwig . 
Sporth6tel Merkur 
Pension Pratschli 


Alb. Schwendener 


Quellenhof 


Wwe. J. Hemken 
Hofer & Co 


Rhatia &Villa Gennania. 
Seehof 


A. Birkmaier, dir . 


Kurhaus Surlej 


Meisser & Sprecher 
E. Baebler, dir 


Valsana 


2. 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
2 


Waldsanatorium 




ATTISHOLZ 
Bad & Kurhaus. 


E. Probst-Otti 


AUVERNIER 

Bellevue 


A. Clerc 


Au (Zurich) 
HalbinselAu 


Chr. Mullet 



28 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Ratea 


M 


1 


|| 

3 


i 


AXENSTEIN 

Grand Hdtel Axenstein. 
ParfchAtel 


M. Theiler-Eberle 


200 
50 

15 
98 
48 
30 
28 
170 
75 
48 
50 
60 
60 
30 
75 
60 
40 
75 
160 
20 

95 

30 
48 
50 
45 
60 
60 
120 
30 
115 
22 
40 


6. 
4. 

4. 

4.50 
4. 
4. 

A 

6'. 
4. 
4. 
4.50 
4. 
5. 
4. 
5. 
4.50 
3. 
4. 
5. 
3.50 

C 

5 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
7. 

7'. 

7 

4. 


2.25 
1.75 

1.75 
2.00 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
2.50 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
2. 
1.50 
1.75 
2 

l!75 
2.50 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 

2!so 

1.75 
2.50 
1.50 
1.80 


5.50 
4. 

3.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
3.50 
6. 
4. 
4.50 

C 

4l 
5. 
3.50 
4.50 
4.50 
3. 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 

S - 

5. 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 
6.50 
4. 
7.50 
3.50 
carte 


7. 
5. 

3.50 
6. 

5. 
4.50 

4 - -,- 

?! 

4.50 
5. 
6. 
4.50 
6. 
4. 
6. 
5.50 
3.50 
4. 
6. 
4. 

6. 

^ _ 
5'. 50 
5. 
5. 
5.50 
5.50 
7.50 

C 

8^50 
4. 
4. 


M. Theiler-Eberle 


BADEN 
Bahnhof 


Bram & Hofmann .... 
K. Gugolz-Gyr 

Borsinger-Walser 


Baren 
Blume . 


Eden 




Engel 




Grand H6tel . ... 


W. Hafen. 


Hirschen 


Otto Wuger 


Jura 

National 


L. Flogerzi 

F. Stucker 


Ochsen 


Xaver Markwalder 
W. Amsler 


Quellenhof 


Rebstock 


Fr. Widmer 


Schwanen 


C. Kiipfer 


9chweizerhof 


Fam. Baumgartner 
Jakob Brodbeck 


Sonne 


Sternen 


Adolf Herzog 
I. Borsinger. 


Verenahof-Limmathof . . 
Waaee. 


J. JOQS 


BALLAIGUES 
Gd. H6tel Aubepine. . . . 

BASLE 
Balances 


Sam. Leresche 


G Strohl 


Bauer am Rhein 


Jules Weber 


Bayerischer Hof . 


J. Ch. Goetz 


Bristol. 


Tritschler & Bar 


Central 


G. Wehrle 


Continental 


Jos. Hold 
Fam. Bossi 


Europaischer Hof 


Jos. Schonberger 


Grand H6tel & Euler. . . 
Hauser. . , 


Fam. Michel 
Fr. Greub-Kohler 
Aug. Schirrer 


Hofer. .. 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



29 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


I 


1 


ll 
It 


5 


BASLE (con.) 
Jura. . . . 


E. Berlauer-Schirrer 
W. Lutz & Co 


125 

35 
60 
60 
44 
48 
130 
30 
20 
120 
30 
100 
148 
37 

15 
6 
70 

45 
40 

130 
40 
20 
50 
100 
70 
30 
60 
100 


4. 
4. 
4.50 
3.50 

s'.so 

7. 
3.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 
7. 
7. 
4. 

4. 
4. 
4. 

3.50 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 
3. 
4. 
4. 
4.50 
3.50 
4. 
4.50 


1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 

l!75 
2.50 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.80 
2.50 
2.50 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

75 
.75 

.75 
.75 
1.50 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 


carte 

A __^ 

4^50 
carte 

3.50 

7. 
3.50 
4.50 
4.50 
carte 
7.50 
7. 
carte 

4. 
4. 
4.50 

3.50 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 

3.50 
4.50 
4. 
4.50 
3.50 
4. 
4.50 


5. 
5. 
5.50 
4. 

4. 
8. 
4. 
5. 
5.50 
carte 
8.50 
8. 
4.50 

5. 
5. 
5. 

4 La^m 

4.50 

5.50 
5. 
4. 

S - 

5! 

5. 
4. 
4.50 
5.50 


KrafFt am Rhein 


Metropole& Monopol. . 
du Pont & Rhein. Hof . . 
Muller's Royal H6tel. . . 
St. Gotthard-Terminus. 


E Haring-Strub 


Jos. Meyer 
A. Mullen. . . 


O.Vogt 




Spalenhof 


H. K. Schmid 


Stadthof 

Storchen 


S. Schatz 
H. Gisiger, dir 
J. Hab6-Ott 


Union 


Univers. . ... 


E. Wantz, dir 


Victoria & National 
Vogt 


Paul Otto 


Fam. Vogt 


B ASEL-B IRSFELDEN 

Waldhaus in der Hardt. 

BASEL-RlEHEN 

BischoShohe 


Emil Hablutzel 


Gottlieb Gfeller 


BAUGY S/MONTREAUX 
Beau-Site 


\ Murisier 


BEATENBERG 
des Alpes-Pension Jung- 
f rau . . , 
Ami^hiihl 




Dr. Hauswirth-Egli . . 


Gd. H. Beatenberg-Kur- 
haus. 


R. Muller-Egli 


Beatrice 
Beatus 
Beau-Regard 
Belle vue 


J lf3i.:::::::::::::: 
? :::::: 


Blumlisalp 


Fam. Howald 
Job. Gfeller 
Chr. Gafner 
E. Egli 


Edelweiss 
Oberland 
Parkhdtel zur Post 





30 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


1 

o 


Minimum Rates 


i 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


Dinner 


BEATENBERG (con.) 
Regina Palace 
Schonegg 


Fam. Brunner. 


150 
70 
40 

74 

85 
70 

90 

24 
20 

50 
120 

80 

100 
50 
250 
30 
130 
26 
40 
15 
15 
20 
45 
49 


6. 
4. 
3.50 

3.50 

4. 
3.50 

4.50 

3.50 
4. 

3.50 
4.50 

4. 

4.50 
4.50 


2. 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 


5.50 
4. 
4. 

3.50 

4. 
3.50 

4. 

4.50 
4. 

4. 
5. 

5. 

4.50 
5 


6 50 
4.50 
4.50 

4. 

5. 
4. 

5. 

4.50 
5. 

5. 
6. 

5. 
6 


A. Graeser. 


Silberhorn 

BBCKENRIED 
Mond 


R. Zahler 
M. Amstad 


Parkhdtel Nidwaldner- 
hof. 




Sonne 


E. Amstad 


BELALP 
Hotel Belalp 


Fam. K. Klingele Co. . . . 
Wilh. Gamper 


BELLINZONA. . 
Bahnhof-Terminus 


Poste, Suisse & Metro- 
pole 


Angelo Sorgesa 


BERGUN 
Weisses Kreuz 


J. Juvalta 


Kurhaus Bergun 


3. Ruegger, dir 
Geschw. Burcher 
H. Marbach 


BERISAL 
Hotel Berisal 


BERNE 
Baren 


Beau-Site 


'etermann-Berger 


Belle vue Palace. . . . 


T . Eggimann, dir 
Ramstein & Witschi .... 
H. Sperl 
J. Cadalbert 


10.- 

s'.so 

4.50 


2.50 

".75 
1.75 


8. 

5. 
4. 
4.50 

3.50 
4.50 


9. 
6^- 


Pension Bois Fleury. . . . 
Bristol 
Brunig 

Bubenberg . 


B. Mittler 


Pension Eden 


Julia Petermann. 


Pension Elite 


H. Duthaler 


Emmenthalerhof 


Alfr Butikofer 


France-Terminus 
Pension Villa Frey 


I. Fleury 
M. Gisiger & Michel 




Tourists listening to the wonderful organ in the convent 
church of Mariastein near Basle 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



31 



Place d Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of bed* 


Minimum Rates 


1 


1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


| 


BERNE (con.) 
de la Gare 


Isidor Cina 


30 

200 
25 
26 
45 
75 
70 
70 
65 

30 
48 
50 
22 
30 
40 
200 
40 
20 
25 
16 
30 

75 

40 
180 

70 
45 
130 
90 


3.50 
7. 
3.50 

4750 
3.50 
4.50 
5. 

4. 

4.50 
4.50 

4. 

3. 
7. 
4.50 

3. 
3.50 
3. 

4.50 

3.50 

5. 

4. 
3.50 
4. 
4. 


1.75 
2.50 
1.75 

1.80 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

2. 
2. 

2. 
2 

2 
2 


3.50 
6.50 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 
4.50 
5. 

3.50 

e 

4^50 

4. 
3.50 
6. 
4. 

3~50 
3.50 
3.50 

5. 

4.50 
6. 

5 ~" 
4^50 
5. 
5. 


7.50 

6. 

7. 

4. 

6. 

4.50 
7. 

5. 
5. 
5. 
6. 


Grand H6tel & Berner- 
hof 


Kraft Sohne 






Fam. Ed. Reinhard 


Pension Jolimont 


E. Baumgartner 
Frau R. Haase 
Th. Zullig, dir 


Jura. 


Eidgen. Kreuz 


Lowen. 


Senger & Herting 
Ch. Hodel 

Alfr. NietUspach 


Metropole (garni) 
National (Maulbeer- 
baum) .... 


Parkh6tel Favorite 


A. Mennet-Studer 
E. Schaffer 


de la Poste 


Pension Quisisana 
Ratskeller, garni 


A. Born 
R. Richter, ger 
L. Gaensli 


Ruof . . 




L. Suter, dir 


Simplon 

Pension Stamm 


R.& E. Konig 
L. Stamm 
A. HaMimann. ......... 


Waadtlanderhof 


Fr. Haas ... 


Wildenmann 

BERN-GURTEN 
Gurten-Kulm 

BEX-LES-BAINS 
des Alpes 




G. Andre, dir 
Fam Riekert 


Bains & Grand Hotel 
des Salines 
H6tel et Bains de 
Crochet 


G. Heinrich, dir . . 


J. Sax. 


Dent du Midi 


Ch Hayn 


Grand H6tel de Bex 
Villas des Bains. 


P. Koehler. 


Vve. Lesoldat, dir 





32 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


^f^aprietor 
or Manager 


Number of bed* | 


Minimum Rates 


1 


1 
I 


II 
3* 


I 


BlEL (BlEN-NE) 
Baren 


H. Herren 


20 
40 
20 
25 
26 
16 

25 
50 
30 

50 
80 
30 


4. 
4.50 
4. 
4. 
4. 
3.50 

3. 
4. 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 
3 50 


1.75 
1.75 
1.80 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

2. 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1 75 


4. 
4.50 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 

4. 

4. 

4. 

4. 
4. 
4 


4.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 

5. 
5. 
4. 

4.50 
4.50 
4 50 


Bielerhof- Terminus. 
de la Gare 


Ed. Bucher 


Wwe. M. Tschannen.. . . 
Otto Manrau 


National 


Victoria. 


E. Ritter 


Weisses Kretiz 


TT. TTahl^- 


BlGNASCO 

da Glacier 


A. Franzoni. 


BINN 


O Schmid 


BLOVAY 

de Blonav 


T Moser 


BOXIGEN 
Bellerive 


A. Aellig 


de la Gare Pens. Sefler.. 
Oberlanderhof 


F. Zurcher-Sciler 


\ Odermatt 


ParlchAtel 


Fam Hasler 


50 
45 

99 
30 
100 
60 

60 

48 
28 
65 


3.50 
3.50 

4. 
3.50 
5. 
3. 

3.50 

3.50 
3. 
3.50 


1.75 

2. 

2.25 
2. 

2. 

1.75 
1.50 
1.75 


4. 

4. 

5. 
4. 
6. 

A 

5. 

3.50 
3.50 
4.50 


4.50 
4. 

6. 
4.75 
7. 
4.50 

6. 

4. 
4. 
5. 


BOUGY-VILLARS 


T Burkli 


BRAUNWALD 
Alpenblick 

Alpina, 


Wwe. Durrer 
E Kohler-Fischer 


Grand Hfitel 


E. Dtirrer, dir 
G. Streiff 

R. Hausermann, dir 
D. Werren 


Niederschlacht. 

BRESTENBERG 
Kuranstalt Schloss 
Brestenberg 


BRIENZ 
Barea 


Rossli 


O. Maetzener . 


Weisses Kreoz 


FrL E. Hanauer 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



33 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


| 


Breakfast 


Su 

sl 

B ~} 

a* 


1 


BRIGUE 
Couronne & Poste 


f. Escher 


95 
35 
49 
60 
50 

20 
150 

60 
110 

250 
30 
37 
70 
18 
120 
60 
20 
36 
50 
240 
38 

40 
35 
50 
20 


5. 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4.50 

3.50 
5. 

4. 

4. 

3!50 
3. 

3. 

4. 
3.50 
3. 
3.50 
3.50 
4.50 
3. 

3. 
4. 

1 ___ 

3.50 


2.25 
o 

l'.7S 
1.50 

2 

1.75 
2.50 

2. 
2! 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
2 

K75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2.25 
1.75 

2. 
2. 
1.50 
1.75 


5.50 
4.50 
4. 
3.50 
5. 

3.50 
6. 

4.50 
4.50 

3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 

3.50 
5. 
3.50 
3.50 


6.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
5.50 

4. 

7. 

5. 
5. 

4.50 
4.50 

3.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
5. 
6. 
4.50 

3.50 
5. 
4. 
4. 


Muller 


Fam. F. Muller 


du Pont 


"Z. Gemmet 
R Zufferey 


BRUNIG 


H A bt) Ian alp 


Gd. H6tel & Kurh. 


Ed. Haubensak 
A. Schoeck 


BRUNNEN 
Eden ' 




Grand Hotel Bninnen . . 
Hellerbad 


A. Benziger 


Jos. Heller 


Hirschen. 
Mythenstein 


Fam. J. Hess 
\. Benziger 


Pension In der Bitzin.. . 

Pa-khotel 


Franz Kuschewski 


Gebr. Aufder Maur 
Fam. Ch. Kaiser 
W. E. Lang 

F Cerncic 


Kaiser's H6tel Rigi 
Rutli 
Villa Schiller 






Waldstatterhof 


Frid Fassbind 


Weisses Rossli 

BRUNNI 
Kurh. Brunni am Pilatus 

BtTLLE 

des Alpes-Terminus. . . . 
BUOCHS 


. . F. Greter 
F Hofstetter, dir 


Ch. Mayer 




BURGDORF 

Bahnhof 


Bernhard Hoby . . 



34 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beda 


Minimum Rates 


i 


1 


Su 

1 
I 5 " 


] 


BtTRGENSTOCK 

Palace-H6tel 


Bucher-Durrer 


200 
220 
130 
70 


7. 

4^50 

4 


2.50 
2.50 
2. 
1 75 


6.50 
6. 

C 

4!50 
3.50 
3.50 

4. 

5. 
5.50 

7. 

4.50 

5. 
6.50 
4. 

3.50 

6. 

5. 
4.50 

4.50 
5. 


8. 
7.50 
5.50 
5. 
4. 
4. 

4. 

5.50 
6. 

8. 
5.50 
6. 

5. 
7.50 
5. 

4. 

7. 

6. 
5.50 

5.50 
6. 


Grand H6tel 


Bucher-Durrer 


Parkhdtel 


Bucher-Durrer 






MattTat 


Th. Amstutz 


40 
60 

25 

70 
80 

180 
30 
45 

50 
175 
50 

50 

145 

300 
70 

150 
50 


3.50 
3.50 

3. 

4. 

4. 

8. 
4. 
5. 

4.50 
6. 
3.50 

3.50 

5. 

5. 

4.50 

4.50 
4. 


1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
2. 

2.50 
1.75 
2.50 

1.75 
2.25 
1.75 

1.75 

2. 

2. 
1.75 

1.75 
2.50 


Waldheim 


Th. Amstutz 


BURGLEN (URi) 

Tell 


Wwe. Epp-Hurni 
J. Mark 


CAMPFER 
Campf6r 


Julierhof 




CAUX 
Caux Palace. 


H. Stierlin, dir 


des Fougeres . . . 


Th. Rouge 


Maria 


G. Grolleau 
G. & L. Frizzoni 


CELERINA 
Cresta Kulm 


Cresta-Palace 
Murail 


Ed. Bezzola, dir 
A. Lendi's Erben 

Vve. L. Mury 
C Biert dir 


CHAILLY S/CLARENS 
Mury 

CHAMBY 
Grand H6tel des 


C HAMPER Y 

Dent-du-Midi 


Th. Exhenry, dir 




O & E D6fago 


CHAMPEX 
des Alpes & du Lac 


F Meilland. 


Marius Arlettaz 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



35 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


| 


ts 

& 
X 


ii 


1 


CHAMPEX (con.) 
Crettex 


Fam Em Crettex 


120 
95 
80 

60 
80 
24 
25 
6 
99 
20 
18 
90 
12 
35 
32 
8 

40 
49 

60 
140 

95 

30 
45 
50 


4. 
4. 
4. 

5. 

4. 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
7. 
4. 
4. 
6. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
3.50 

3.50 
4.50 

4. 
4. 

5. 

3.50 
4. 
4. 


1.75 
1.75 

.75 

2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
2. 
.75 
.75 
2. 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 

1.75 
1.75 

2. 
1.75 

2. 

1.50 
1.75 
1.75 


4. 

A 

4l 

5. 
5. 

4. 
4. 
4.50 
6. 
4.50 
4.50 
5.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
3.50 

4. 
4.50 

4.50 
4. 

5.50 

3.75 
4. 
4. 


5. 
5. 
5. 

6. 
6. 
4.50 
4.50 
5. 
8. 
5. 
5. 
6. 
5. 
5. 
5. 
4. 

5. 
5.50 

5.50 
5. 

7. 

4.25 

5. 
5. 


du Glacier 


Biselx freres 


d'Orny 


A. Rausis-Morand 


CHATEAU D'OEX 
Alexandra (Soldanelle) . . 
Berthod 
Pension de la Bruyere. . 
Pension de la Cheneau. . 
Buffet de la Gate 


E. Fausch 


A. Frey-Martin, dir 
E. Kaufmann 


E. Mottier. 


F. Schletti 


Grand Hdtel. 


A. Frey-Martin, dir 
S. Rosat 




A. Chabloz 


Rosat 


\. Rosat 




E Fausch 


du Torrent 


A. Widmer 




D. Henchoz-Pilet 


deVille 

CHATEAU D'OEX- 
L'ETIVAZ 
Bains de 1'Etivaz. 


J. Saugy 

D. Henchoz-Pilet 


CHATELARD 
Suisse 


V. Vouilloz 


CHESIERES 
Belvedere. 




du Chamossflire, 


Pierre Amiguet 


CHEXBRES 
du Signal 


P. Fonjallaz 


CHUR (CoiRE) 


Emil Schallibaum 
G. Rieder-Hess. 




Lukmanier-Tenninus. . . 


Tob. Branger 



36 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


! 

^ 

1 


Minimum Rates 


i 


1 
1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


s 


CHUR (CoiRE) (con.) 
Marsol & Neue 
Hofkellerei 


J. Schneider- Frei 
O. Scheibler-Ziegler 
E. Butikofer dir 


22 
12 
90 
50 

65 

40 

30 
50 
60 
35 
48 

26 
15 
70 
65 

130 
30 
60 
18 


3.50 
3.50 
5. 
4. 

3.50 
3. 

3. 
3.50 
3.50 
4.50 

3.50 
5. 

5. 


1.50 
1.50 
2_ 

l!75 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
2. 

2. 


3.50 
3.50 
6. 

4. 

4. 
3.50 

3.50 
4 


4. 
4. 
6. 
5. 

4.50 
4. 

4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
5. 

5~^- 
6. 

7. 


Rebleuten. 


Steinbock 


Stern 


E. Taverna 


CHURWALDEN 


O Schubiger 


Post. 


Frl. N. Gadmer 


CLARENS, 

See MONTREUX 

CLAVADEL 

Kurhaus 


Keller, Verwalter 
P. A. Scarpatetti 
G. Dequis 


CONTERS I. O. 

Post & Villa Bellavista.. 

CORBEYRIER 

Victoria. 


CORNONE-DALPE 
des Alpes 


Fam. d'Ambrogio. . . 


A 

4.50 

4. 
5. 

6. 


CREST A- AVERS 
Kurhaus 


J. Wieland-Passet 


DAVOS-DORF 
Pension Aela 


H. Stehlin-Doll 
Wwe. E. Reicherter 
Job. P. Bernhard 
A. Hvalsoe, dir 


Bahnhof , garni 
Continental 


Sanatorium Davos-Dorf . 
Fluela-Post & Sport- 
H6tel 


Andreas Credig 
Frl. E. Odewald 


Pension Germania, 
Sanatorium Guardaval. . 


W. Stiehle, dir 
Frl. L. Hunerkopf 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



37 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


1 


1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


DAVOS-DORF (con.) 
Meierhof 
Montana. 

Neues Sanatorium 
Pension Villa Paul 


J.Meier 
Abr. Gredig 

M. Neubauer 


48 
50 
50 
16 
24 
70 
15 
30 

12 
60 
80 
23 
35 
50 
35 
100 
100 
14 
28 
20 
200 
38 
40 
53 
30 

20 
30 
40 
20 

220 
9 
18 
16 
28 


4.50 
5 . 

3.50 

6. 

4. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

7. 
4. 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 

3. 

7. 

3. 


2. 
2 

2. 

2.50 

1.75 
2. 

2. 

2. 

2.50 
1.75 
2. 
2. 
2. 

1.50 
2.50 

2.50 


5. 
5.50 

4. 

7. 

A 

S] 

6. 
6. 

7. 
4.75 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 

3. 
7.50 

4.00 


5.50 
6.50 

5. 

8. 

4.50 
6. 

7. 
7. 

8. 
5. 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 

4.50 
9. 

5.00 


Wwe. C. Kersting 


Pension Sans-Souci 
Sanatorium Seehof 




P. Schlosser, dir 


Pension Sieber 
Pension Stolzenfels 


Frau vSieber 
Frau Fr. Poeschel 


DAVOS-PLATZ 

Pension Villa Ada 


Frau & Frl. Strauch 
Friedrich, Verw 




Angleterre & Parkhdtel . 
Pension Athenes 




S. Paligninis 


Sporth6tel Bahnhof 


H. Alder 


Bellavista 


B Accoli-Meisser 


Sanatorium Bernina. . . . 
Buols Kurgartenh6tel.. . 
Centralsporth6tel 
Pension Chalet am Wald 
Pension Christiana 


Marg. Raas. 
R. Braunschweig .... 


A. Stiffler-Vetsch 
Wwe. Renz 


Wwe. Loens 
Karl Schneider 


Curhaus Davos 


W. Holsboer, g6rant 
Chr. Stiffler 


Davoserhof 


Eden 
Eisenlohr 


Heinr. E. Saxer 
Dr. jur. Munch 


Elite 


G. Suter 


Damenpension Villa 
Emma. 


Frl. S. Frick 


Pension Eugenia 
Frei 


Dem. Charalambous . . . . 
P. Frei 




Frau M Gunther. 


Grand Hotel & Belve- 
dere 


Ch. Elsener, dir. 


Pension Hamburgerhof . 


Frl Wild 


Kessler-Heiss 


Jugendheim Pravenda. . 
Pension Lichtenstein . . . 


Klein 
Wwe. Sewolodoff 





38 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


1 

o 


Minimum Rates 


H 


Breakfast 


H 
3 


1 


DAVOS-PLATZ (con.) 




30 
14 
30 
100 
30 

60 
70 

80 
30 
30 
17 
24 
25 
50 

120 
18 
68 
90 
60 
20 
70 
26 
30 

120 
198 
100 
120 


4. 

6. 
5. 

5. 

5. 
4.50 

5. 

3.50 
6. 

4. 
5 
4.50 


1.75 

2. 

2 

2!50 
2. 

2. 
o 

2 
2. 

1.75 
2 

2. 
2. 
2. 


4. 

5. 
6. 
5. 

6. 

6. 

5. 

4.50 
5. 

4. 
6. 

5. 
6. 

5. 


4. 

6. 
7. 
7. 

7. 

7. 
6. 

5. 
6. 

4.50 

7 . 

6. 
6. 


Pension Luginbuhl 


Prl. Luginbuhl 




Frau Hary-Issler 


National 


J. P. Branger 


Sanatorium Dr. Philippi 
Neues Post- & 
Sporth6tel 


R. Mayer-Conrady 

A. Morosani-Sulser 
J. Steenaerts, dir 

J. Boesch 


Platzsanatorium 
Sporth6tel Rhatischer 
Hof 


Rose 


O. Rose 




Wwe Koch 




Prl. Baer 


Pension Rychner 
Pension Villa Sana 


Frau B. Rychner 
Pf r. Kobelt 


Savoy-Splendid 


H. Scholer, dir ... 


Sanatorium 
Schweizerhof 


R. Neimeier, dir 


Pension Villa Stefan 
Strela 


H. Arbajter 


Heinr. Gstrein 


Dr. Turbans Sanatorium 
Victoria 


Schneider, dir 


H. Schmitz 


Pension Viola-Albrecht . 
Waldsanatorium Davos. 


Frau M. Albrecht. 


O. Friese, dir 


Frau Wijers 


Sanatorium Dr. Wolfer. 

DAVOS-SCHATZALP 

Sanatorium Schatzalp. . 

DlABLERETS 

Grand H6tel 


Dr. Wolfer. 


Schachenmann, dir. 


Fam. Fritz Buchs 


DlSENTIS 

Disentiserhof 
EGGISHORN 


F. Tuor 
Fam. E. Cathrein 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



39 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


00 

? 
1 


Minimum Ratea 


1 


! 


Su 

11 


i 


EltfSIEDELN 


K. Gyr. , 


100 
80 
55 

30 
40 
150 
70 
80 
100 
60 
350 
150 
60 
74 
200 
70 
25 
180 
200 
32 
60 
15 

40 
10 

15 


3.50 
4. 
3. 

3. 
3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
4.50 
4. 
3. 

3!50 
3.50 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 
3. 
6. 
5. 
3. 
3.50 
3. 

3. 
3.50 

4. 


1.80 
2. 
1.50 

.50 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 

'.75 
.75 
.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.50 
2. 
2. 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 

1.75 
1.75 

2. 


3.50 
5. 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 
4.50 
4.50 
3.50 
6. 
4. 
3.50 
4.50 
5. 
4. 
3.50 
6. 

3'.50 
4.50 
3.50 

carte 
4. 

4. 


4.50 
5.50 
4. 

4. - 

4. 
5.50 
4. 
5. 

5 _ 

4 -^-. 

7'. 

4.50 
4. 
5. 
6. 
5. 
4. 
7. 
6. 
4. 
5. 
4. 

carte 
4.50 

5. 


ELM 




EMMETTEN 
Kurhaus Engel 


L. Niederberger 

Gebr. Cattani. . . 
J. & L. Fischer 
Gebr. Odermatt 


ENGELBERG 
des Alpes 


Alpina 




Central 


Jos. Lang. . . . 




Jos. Tschopp. 


Engel 


Engelberg. 


J. Hess-Amrhein 


Grand H6tel & Kurhaus 
Hess 
Margherita. .... 


Gebr. Cattani 


Gebr. Hess 
J. Key 


Muller & Hoheneck 
Parkhotel Sonnenberg . . 
Villa Schcntal 


Frau Bertha Amstad 
H. Haefelin 


Fam. Gander 


Terrace-Palace 


G. Fassbind 


Titlis . . . 


Gebr. Cattani 
Frau F. Kaufmann 
H. X. Gehrig 
Geschw. Hurschler. 


Pension Trautheim 
Victoria. 


Pension Waldegg. 


ENGELBERG-TRUBSEE 
Hess 

ERLENBACH-ZURICH 
Gold. Kreuz 


Gebr. Hess > .. 

H. Lutschg-Schmidt 

Ad. Mutter-Kluser. 


EUSEIGNB 

des Pyramides- 
Euseigne. 







40 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 





Breakfast 


5*. 

11 

$v 


5 


ETTINGEN 
Bad-Hdtel 


Max Menzkiger 


20 

50 

26 
90 

30 
49 

45 
40 

30 
30 

35 

45 

100 
100 
74 

74 


3. 

3.50 

3. 

4. 

4. 
3. 

3. 
3. 

3. 
2.50 

3.50 
4. 

4. 

4.50 
4. 

4. 


1.80 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

2. 
2. 

1.80 
1.80 

2. 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 


3. 

4.50 

4. 
5. 

4. 
4.50 

3.50 
3.50 

4. 
3.50 

4. 

4. 

4. 

4.50 
4. 

4.50 


3.50 

5. 

4.50 
5. 

5. 
5. 

4. 

4. 

5 -" 

4! 

4.50 
5. 

5. 
5.50 
5. 

5.50 


EVILARD S/BlENNE 

(LEUBRINGEN) 
Trois Sapins 

PAIDO 

Fransioli 


Vve. L. Kluser 
A. Fransioli 


Suisse 


F. Pedrini fils 


FAULHORN 
Berghotel Faulhom. .... 

PET AN 
Bellavista . . 


Fritz Bohren 


N. Lotscher. 


PEUSISBERG 
Prohe Aussicht 


R. Suter-Feusi 


Schonfels 


B. Machler 


PEXTHAL 
Fex 


B. Arquint's Erben 
Gian Fumrn 


Sonne 


PlESCH 

des Alpes 
Glacier & Poste 


M. Feller. . . 
C 9peckly. 


FINHAUT 
Bel-Oiseau & Villa 


E. Chappex & fils. . 


Bristol. 


Lonf at freres 
Lonf at freres. 




FlONNAY 

Grand Gombin 


Fam. M. Guigoz 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



41 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


\ 


Minimum Rates 


Number of b 


1 


I 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


FLIMS 
Bellevue Sporth6tel 
Vorab 


F. Locher 

Wwe Januth 


40 
25 

15 

50 
115 

320 
50 
45 

30 

120 
90 
90 

25 
80 
45 
40 

74 

164 

40 

35 


4. 
3. 

4. 

A 


1.75 
1.75 

1.80 
1.75 


4. 

3.50 

4. 
4 


4.50 
4. 

4.50 

c B 


PLIMS-FIDAZ 
Kurhaus Fidaz 


Max Baiter . . 


FLIMS- WALDHAUS 


Hans Nepelius 


Grand H6tel& Surselva. 
Kuranstalt und Hotel 
Waldhaus 


P. Buol, dir. 


6. 

S - -- 

4i50 
3.50 

4.50 

5. 
4. 
4. 

3. 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 

3. 

4.50 
3. 

3.50 


2.50 

2.50 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

3. 
1.75 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.50 

2. 

1.75 

1.75 


6. 

6. 
7. 

4. 

4.50 

5. 
4.50 
5. 

3.50 
4.50 
4. 
4. 

3.50 

5. 
3.50 

carte 


7. 

7 

si 

5. 
5.50 

6. 
5.50 
6. 

4. 

5.50 
4.50 
4.50 

4. 

6. 
4. 

4. 




National 


Ferd. Kahn 


Posthotel & Chalet 
Priv.-Hotel & Villa 
Genziana 
Schweizerhof & Villa 
Helvetia .... 




Reinhard Gerres 
D. Schmidt 


Segnes & Villa Erika. . . 
Walther & des Alpes.. . . 

FLUELEN 
Fluelerhof. .... 


Chr. Zaugg, dir 
Ch. Walter 


Alfred Kaelin 


Grand H6tel & Adler. . . 
Weisses Kreuz & Post . . 


Alfr. Muller 
A. Muller-Betschem .... 
Flumm-Joerger, dir 

L. Enzmann Erben 
P. Hess-Michel. 


FLUHLI (ENTLEBUCH) 
Kurhaus 


FLUHLI-RANFT 

Kurhaus Nxinalphorn. . . 
Kurhaus Stolzenfels 

FRAUENFELD 
Bahnhof 


Frau H Rothlin. 


Alfred Ratz. 







42 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


I 


I 


S* 

f | 

JM 


1 


FRIBOURG 

Suisse 


M. Python 


40 
80 

100 
100 

110 
70 
60 
45 
48 

60 
80 
180 
98 
60 
40 
50 
98 
30 
70 
80 
70 


4. 
5. 

4. 
4. 

3.50 

C 

3.50 
4.50 

3.50 
5. 
8.50 
6. 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 
8. 
3.50 
4. 
4.50 
4. 


1.75 
2. 

2. 
2. 

1.75 
2.25 
2. 
1.80 
1.75 

1.75 
2.25 
2.50 
2.50 
2. 
1.75 
1.80 
2.75 
1.75 
2. 
2 

2! 


3.75 
5. 

4.50 
4.50 

4. 
5. 
6. 
4. 
4.50 

4.50 
6. 
9. 

7. 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
8. 
4.50 
5.50 
4.50 
5. 


4.50 
5.50 

5.50 
5.50 

4.50 
6.50 
7. 
4. 
5.50 

5.50 
7. 
10. 
8. 
5. 
5. 
5. 
9. 
5.50 
5.50 
5. 
6. 


Terminus & Zahringer- 
hof 


A. Gorini 


FRUTT AM MELCHSEE 
Kurhaus Frutt 
Kurhaus Reinhard 

FIJRIGEN OB STANSSTAD 
H6tel & Kurhaus 


Fam. Egger 
Alb. Reinhard 

P Odermatt 


FURKA-PASSHOHE 
Furka 


Ed. Muller 


FURKAROUTE 

Belvedere 


Familie Seller 


GAIS 
Krone 


J. Flury 


GEMMI PASS 
Wildstrubel 


Fam. Varonier 


GENEVA 
des Alpes 

d'Angleterre. . . 


Vve. R. Staub 


A. Reichert 
Ch. A. Mayer 
Ch. J. Eisenhoffer 
O. Leppin-Kreutzer. . . . 


Beau-Rivage 
Bellevue 


Bristol. 


British Pension 


City H&tel Fleischmann. 
de 1'Ecu 


Familie J. Michel 


Pension Eden 


G. Evard 


Europe 
des Families 
de Geneve et du Bresil . 


H. Buffavand. 


F. Ehinger 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



43 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


i 


1 
I 


S 

!I 


1 

5 


GENEVA (con.) 
International & 
Terminus 
M6 tropole & National . . 
Minerva 


Vve E Amherd. 


70 
140 
45 
95 
150 
70 
45 
95 
30 
95 
30 
74 
95 
75 

160 

48 
130 
50 

20 

100 
100 
40 

30 

45 


4.50 
8.50 
3.50 
4.50 
6. 
4. 
4. 
5. 
4. 
6. 
4.50 
4. 
5. 
4.50 

6. 

3. 

C 

3^50 
3.50 

5. 

5. 
3.50 

3. 
4. 


2. 
2.50 
2. 
2. 
2.50 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2.50 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 

2. 

1.50 

2. 
1.75 

1.70 

2. 
2. 
1.75 

1.50 
2. 


5.50 
9. 
4.50 

7'.50 

e 

5'. 

5. 

5. 
7. 

5. 
5.50 
5. 

6.50 

3.50 
5.50 
3.50 

4. 

5. 

4l 

3.50 
4. 


6.50 
10. 
5. 

1:3 

5. 
6. 

C ^ m 

si 

6. 
6. 
6. 

7.50 

4. 
5.50 
4. 

4. 

6. 
6. 
4.50 

4. 
4. 


E. Huni, dir . . 


E. Hoerl. . 




J Stalder. 


de la Paix. 


Jean Baehl, adm. . . 


de Paris 


Ed. Kottmann 
E. Kahr 


Pension Regina 


Richemond. 


A.R. Armleder 
A. Reymond 


Pension de la Roseraie. . 
Russie & Continental. . . 
du Siecle 


V. Ernens 




Suisse 

Touring-Balance 
Victoria. 


W. Driestmann 


A. Muller. dir 
P Schlenker 


GENEVE-CHAMPEL 
Beau-S6jour. 


E. Perre'ard, dir 

Alfred Sommer 
Pam. A. Muller 
A.Lagler 

H. Zentner 


GERSAU 
Beau-Sejour. 


Muller 
Seehof 

GERSENSEE 
Kurhotel Baren 

GlESSBACH 
Grand Hotel 




Kurhaus 




Pension Beau-Site. . 




GISWIL 
Krone 

GLARIS 

Glarnerhof. .... 


Nikl. Ming 
K. Hohn 





44 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds || 


Minimum Rate* 


I 


Breakfast 


i! 


1 


GLETSCH 
Glacier du Rhdne . . . 


Familie Seller 


200 

70 
130 

40 

145 
80 
145 

20 

36 
60 
40 

80 
40 

40 
70 

25 
100 


5. 

4. 

5. 
4.50 
3.50 

s! 

C 

3. 

3.50 
4. 
4. 

4. 
4. 

3. 
4. 

3. 
5. 


2. 

1.75 
2. 

l!75 

2_ 

2! 

1.50 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

2. 

1.50 
1.75 

1.75 

2, 


5. 

4.50 
6. 

C 

3'.50 

5. 
5. 
6. 

3.50 

3.50 
4. 
4. 

4. 
4.50 

3.50 
4. 

3.50 
5. 


6. 

5.50 
7. 
6. 
4. 

6. 
6. 

7. 

4. 

A rTM ^ 

5'. 
5. 

5. 
5. 

4. 
5. 

4. 
6. 


GLION S/MONTREUX 
des Alpes Vaudoises. . . . 
Bellevue 
Belv6dere 


C. Benoit 


F. Buchs, fils \ 
F. Buchs, fils / 


de Glior 


Wilh. Muller 


Gd. H&tel & Righi 
Vaudois 


E. Riechelmann 
E. Gaiser 


Park-Hfitel. 




Vve. D. Candrian 


GOLDERN-HASLIBERG 

Gletscherblick 

GOLDIWIL 
Blumlisalp . 


Fam. Hirsig 
K. Stegmann 




Frau L. Fries 


Waldpark 


K. L. Blatter 


GOSCHENEN 

Weisses Rossli 


Fam. Z'Graggen 


GOTTSCHAI.KENBERG 
Kurhaus 

GRANGES S/SALVAN 
Gay-Balmaz 


Dr. Meyer 

Gay-Balmaz freres 
Alfred Kraft 


Grand H6tel des 


GREPPEN 

St Wendelin 




GRIESALP (KIENTAL) 
Grand H6tel & Kurhaus. 


F. W. Scheurer, dir 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



45 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Namber of beds 


Minimum Rates 


i 


1 


8* 

js a 


1 


GRIMMIALP 
Grand H6tel Kurhaus. . 

GRIMSELPASS 
Grimselhospiz 


R. Krtn*, dr. 


100 
50 

60 
20 
250 
45 
48 
42 
100 
10 
35 
60 
20 
25 
30 
30 
25 
30 
25 
170 
30 
100 
80 
25 
30 
10 
35 
10 

50 


5. 
4.50 

4. 
3. 
7. 

'.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 

'.50 

'.50 
.50 

'.50 

3'. 
3.50 
3. 

3.50 


2. 
1.75 

.75 
.50 
2.25 
.75 
.75 
.75 
2. 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 
2. 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.75 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
2. 

1.50 


5. 
4.50 

4.50 
3.50 
6. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
5. 
3.50 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4. 
4. 
6. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
4. 
4. 

3.50 


6. 
5.50 

5.50 
4. 
7. 

S ~- ji " 
4^50 
4.50 
6. 
4. 
4.50 
S 

4! 

5. 
4. 
4. 

4 . 

4!so 

4.50 
7. 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
4. 
5. 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 

4.50 


J. Thonen-Zwahlen 
Ad. Boss . . 


GRINDBLWALD 
Adler 


Alpenblick 
Grand H6tel Bar 
Bahnhof -Terminus 


Jak. Reist 
H. J. Arnet, dir 
E. Gsteiger 


Beau-Site 


Frau M. Metzner 


Bel-Air Eden 
Belvedere 


Fam. Moser 


Belle vue 




Centralh6tel Wolter 
Glacier 


Frau Wolter ... 


S. Jaquiery 
Fam. Brunner 


Gletschergarten 
Grosse Scheidegg 


Ad. Bohren 


Hirschen 
Tungfrau 
Pension Kirchbuhl 
National 


Wwe. E. Bleuer 
J. Markle. 


F. Brawand-Schwab 
G. Gruber 
H. Mohr-Bohren 


Oberland 
Regina-Albenruhe 
Villa Sans Souci 


Heusler & Burgener 
Ad. Stettler. 


Schonegg 


Schweizerhof 
Silberhorn 
Waldh6tel Villa Bellary. 
Waldspitz. 


Adolf Anneler 


Gebr. Kaufmann 
Frau E. Zschokke .... 


Frl. Steuri 


Weisses Kreuz & Post. . 
Wetteihorn 


F. Haussener 
E. Steuri-Brunner 

Fridolin Jaeger 


GRUBEN 
Schwarzhorn . ... 







46 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Placo and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Ratea 


M 


1 


i! 

3* 


1 


GRYON 




60 

30 
30 
80 
90 
100 
30 
60 
60 
80 
35 
250 
40 

40 

40 
45 
20 
100 
100 
120 

400 

35 
50 


3. 

3.50 
3.50 
5. 
5. 
4.50 
3.50 
4. 

A 
C 

3i50 
10.- 
4. 

3.50 

d. ~^ 

4i 
3.50 

C 

c 

7! 

7. 

3. 
4. 


1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
2 

2! 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2.50 
1.75 

2. 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 

2\ 
2.25 

2.50 

1.75 
1.75 


4. 

3.50 
3.50 
6. 
5. 
4.50 

A 

4!50 
4. 
5. 
3.50 
8. 
4. 

4.50 

4. 
4. 
3.50 
5. 
6. 
6. 

6.50 

3.50 
4. 


4.50 

4. 

4. 
j 

6! 
5.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
6. 
4. 
9. 
4.50 

5.50 

4.50 
5. 
4. 
6. 
6. 
7. 

7.50 

4. 

5 - 


GSTAAD 
Alpenblick 


H. Deppeler 


Alpenruhe. 


H. Treichler-Feuz 
E. Bum 
P. Boss, dir 


Grand H6tel Alpina 
Bellevue & Kurhaus. . . . 




A. von Siebenthal 
G. Mosching 
Arnold Burri 


Ebnit 


National 




R. Reichenbach 


Park-Hotel 


H. Reuteler 


Posth6tel & Rossli 
Royal & Winter Palace. 
Victoria 




W. Michel, dir... 


H. Stettler 


GUARDA 

Meisser 


A. Meisser 


GUNTEN 

Bellevue 


E. Prutiger 


Eden & Elisabeth 


Rich. Zimmermann 
Oppliger-Goddard 
Geschw. Graber 


Pension Guntenmatt . . . 
Hirschen 






du Pare 


A. Lanzrein. 


GURNIGEL 

Grand H6tel & 
Kuranstalten 

GURTEN, see BERNE 

GUTTANNEN 

Baren . 


K. Schelb, dir 
B. Rufibach 


HANDECK 
Handeck. 


E. Ammon-Hofer 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



47 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


S 
1 

i 


Minimum Rates 


I 


1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


HAUDERES 
Edelweiss 


E. Follonier. 


27 
40 

120 
50 
60 

90 
40 
60 

70 
40 
90 

160 

30 

55 
25 
50 

60 
70 
60 
70 
60 

20 


3.50 
3.50 

5. 
3.50 
4. 

3. 
3. 

-J 

4.50 
3.50 
5. 

5. 

3.50 

4. 
3.50 
4.50 

4. 
4. 
3.50 

A 

3.50 


1.50 
1.50 

2. 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
2. 
1.75 

2. 
2. 
2. 

2. 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 

1.75 


3.50 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 
4. 

3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

5. 

3.50 
5. 

5. 

3.50 

4. 
3.50 
4.50 

4. 
4. 
3.50 
5. 
4. 

4. 


4.50 
4.50 

5. 
5. 
5. 

4. 
3.50 
4. 

5.50 
4.50 
6. 

6. 

4. 

5. 
4. 
5.50 

5. 
5. 
4. 
6. 
5. 

5. 


H6tel Hauderes. 




HEIDEN 
Freihof 




Krone 


P. E. Kuhne 






HERGISWIL 
Bellevue-Rossli .... 
Kurh. Brunni am Pilatus 
Pilatus 


Th. Purler 
F. Hofstetter, dir 


J. L. Fuchs . . 


HERTENSTEIN 
Hdtel- Pension Herten- 
stein 
Pilatus 


G. Berger 

L. Bachler-Herzog 


Schlossh6tel 

BAD HEUSTRICH 
Bad Heustrich 

HlLTERFINGEN 

Eden 


G. Berger 
W. Lups, dir 
C. Thoenen 


Hilterfingen & Pension 
Marbacli . . . 


A. Marbach 


Schonbuhl 

Wildbolz 


J. Berger 
R. Wildbolz. 


HOHFLUH 

Bellevue 


Fam. Tannler 


Kurhaus Alpenruhe .... 
Kurhaus Hohfluh 


E. Wiegand-Willi 


E. Wiegand-Willi 


Schweizerhof 


Fam. Gysler-Maurer. . . . 
J.Urfer 

A. Stalder-Bischoff 


Wetterhorn 

HONDRICH 

AlteU. 





48 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


I 


Breakfast 


ij 

a& 


! 


HONDRICH (con.) 
Pension Alpina 


Fritz Wyss 


18 
24 

40 

74 

20 
12 

50 

45 
20 
90 
40 
75 
35 
100 
100 
95 
20 
100 
90 
70 
100 
70 
20 

170 
25 
80 


3.50 
3. 

3.50 
4.50 

3.50 
3. 
3. 

3.50 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
3.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 
3.50 

6. 
3.50 
4. 


1.75 
1.50 

1.75 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

*) 

2! 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 

2.25 
1.75 
1.75 


3.50 
3.50 

4.50 
4.50 

4. 

3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 
4 
4. 

A 

3^50 

5. 

e 

4^50 
3.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
3.50 

6 


4. 
4. 

5. 
5.50 

5. 

4. 

4. 
4. 
5. 
4.50 
5. 
4. 
6. 
6. 
5.50 
4. 
5.50 
6. 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
4.00 

7. 
4.50 
5. 




H. Steinegeer 


HOSPENTHAL 
Gold. Lowen . . 


Casp. Meyer 


Meyerhof 

HUNIBACH 
Pension Hunibach 


Fam. Meyer 
Alois Aerni 


IMMENSEB 
Eiche-Post 


J. Seeholzer 


IXNERTKIRCHEN 

Hof & Post 


E. Ammon-Hofer 


INTERLAKEN 
Alpenblick 


Pam Hasler 


Baren 


Frau L. Hodel . . 
Hofweber & Co. A.-G. . . 
Sch western Hodel 


Bavaria 


Beau-Sejour 


Beau-Site 
Pension Bel- Air 


J. Wurth 
Ad Oehrli 


Bellevue 
Belvedere 
Bernerhof 


Fam. Storck. 
J. Wurth 


Blume 
Bristol-Terminus 
Carlton-Brunig 


Fr. Zutter. 
Rud. Hunziker, dir 
Ad Ritschard 


Central & Continental. . 
Eden 


E. Ritschard, dir 


A. Burgi 


Europe 
Goldener Anker. . . 


Fam. Alf . Ritschard .... 
E. Weissang 


Grand H6tel& 
Beau Rivag* 


Alb Dopfner 


Helvetia 
Hirschen 


Fam. Sterchi. . . 
Karl Buhler 


4. 

4. 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



49 



Place and Hotel 



INTERLAKEN (con.) 
Interlaken- 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rate* 


i 


1 


IB 


1 


E. Hirschi... 


100 
25 
300 
80 
70 
120 
40 
70 
35 
150 
40 
170 
110 

130 
110 
175 
30 
75 
140 
45 
30 

160 
90 
70 
70 
48 
400 

85 

45 
40 


4.50 
3.50 
6. 

5. 

A 

4! 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 
6. 
4. 

tr 

s! 

5. 
4.50 
7. 
3. 
4. 
6. 
4. 
3.50 

6. 
4. 

4. 
5. 
4. 
7. 

4. 

3.50 
3.50 


2. 
1.75 
2.25 
2. 
2. 
1.80 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2.25 
1.75 
2. 
2 

2. 
1.75 
2.50 
1.75 
2. 
2.25 
1.75 
1.75 

2.25 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2.50 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 


5. 
3.50 
7. 
5. 
5. 
4. 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 
6. 
.4 
5. 

C 

5. 
4.50 
7. 
3.50 
4.50 
6. 
4. 
3.50 

6. 

4. 
4.50 
5. 
4. 

7. 

4. 
4.~ 

A 


5.50 
4. 
8. 
6. 
5.50 
5. 
4. 
6. 
4.00 
.7. 
4.50 
6. 
6. 

o . * 
5. 
8.50 

A - .^m 

5'. 

7.50 
5. 
4. 

7. 
5.~ 
5. 
6. 
4.50 
8. 

5. 

4.50 

5. 


Pension Iris 
Grand H6tel Jungfrau. . 
Jura 
Krebs 


J. Frutiger 


A. Miiller, dir. g6n 
E. Botz-Buhler. . . 
Ed. Krebs 




Fam. Biere-Kohler 




du Lac & Ostbahnhof . . 


W. Hofmann . . 


P. Tschiemer 


Grand H6tel Mattenhof 
Merkur . . . '. . 


Elmer-Sprenger 


Rud. Hanny 


National. . 
du Nord 


Herm. Wyder 
Gebr. Maurer 


Oberland- 
Oberlanderhof 
Park-Hotel 


M. Wagner 




Retina- Jungfraublick 


P. Oesch, dir 


Pension Rugenpark .... 
St. Gotthard 


E. Beldi 
A. Beugger 


Savoy 
Schloss Villa 


Herm. Wyder 
Fam. Buhler 




Frau R. Reinhard 


Schweizerhof-H6tel 


Th. Wirth 




Hachi& Hansen... 
N. Schafflutzel 
F. Masserey 


Sonne 


Splendide .... 


Touriste 


Th Hachi 


Grand H&tel Victoria. . . 
INTERLAKEN-UNSPUN- 

NEN 

Waldh6tel & Pens. 


A. Mullet, dir. ge"n 

FrauR. Heger 

Wwe. Abegglen 
U. Abegglen f 


ISELTWALD 

du Lac 


Strand H6tel 







50 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


H 


I 
1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


! 


JAKOBSBAD 
Jakobsbad 


TohcLnn Elscr 


60 
70 

20 
40 
80 
30 

70 

110 
40 
80 
30 
80 
30 
80 
60 
170 
50 

40 
120 

25 
50 
80 
40 
30 

50 

70 


3.50 
4.50 

4. 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 
3.50 

A 

3^50 
4. 
3. 
5. 
4.50 
6. 
4. 

3.50 
4. 

3.50 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 

4. 
4. 


.80 
1.75 

.75 
.80 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 

1.75 
2. 

.80 

.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 

2. 
1.75 


5. 
4.50 

4.50 
4.50 
4. 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
3.50 

A 

4i 
4. 
4. 
5. 
4.50 
5.50 
4. 

4. 

5. 

3.50 
4. 

A 

4! 
3.50 

5. 
4. 


4. 
5.50 

4.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
4. 
5. 
4.50 
5. 
5. 
6. 
5.50 
6.50 
5. 

5. 
6. 
4. 

r m 

5. 
4.50 
4. 

6. 
5. 


JOCHPASS 
Kurhaus Engstlenalp. . . 

KANDERSTEG 
Adler 


Wwe. Inuner 


H. Bohny 
Rud. Rohrbach 


Alpenrose 


Baren 


Ed. Egger 


Blumlisap 


D. Wandfluh 


Bellevue 


Fam. Rikli-Egger \ 
Fam. Rikli-Egger J 
F. Loosli-Brugger 
G. Hegnauer 


Central 
Grand H6tel . ... 


Kreuz 


Kurhaus 


J. Reichen 


Oeschinensee 
Parkh6tel Gemmi 
Pension Regina 


D. Wandfluh 
H Dettelbach 


H. Dettelbach 
Ed. Egger & Trog 
Gottfr. Muller 


Schweizerhof-Tea Room 
Sporth6tel Bernerhof . . . 
Victoria 


Victor Egper & Cie 
H. Dettelbach 


Waldrand .... 


KASTANIENBAUM 

Kastanieubaum . . 


Jos Borsinger 


KERNS 
Waldh6tel Burgfluh. . . 

KlENTAL 

Alpenruh 
Baren 


F. Hess-Michel 


Jak. Mani-Lauener 
F. & M. Uehli 
J. G. Thonen 


Kientalerhof 


Kurhaus Bergfrieden . . . 
Schoaegg 


Marie Eicher 


R. Meister 


KLAUSEN PASS 
Klausen-Passhohe 
Posthaus Urigen 


Em. Schillig 


Fam. O. Jauch 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



51 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


1 


1 


Lnnch or 
Sapper 


I 


KLOSTERS 
Alpenhof & Bahnhof . . . 


A. Stingelin-Borkel 


16 

50 
200 
200 
25 

40 
100 
20 

12 
30 
40 

85 

40 
80 
40 
25 


3. 

A 

6. 
6. 
3.50 

3. 
3. 
3.50 

y 

3! 

5 

6. 

4. 

3. 
5. 
3. 


1.75 

1.75 
2.50 
2.50 
1.75 

1.50 
1.50 
1.75 

1.75 
1.80 
1.75 

2 

1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 


4. 

4.50 
6.50 
6.50 
4. 

3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
4. 
3.50 

5. 

4.50 
4. 
4. 
3.50 


5.50 
7.50 
7.50 
5. 

4. 

4 --^L 

4.50 

4. 
4. 
4. 

5. 

5.50 
5. 
5. 
4. 


Weisses Kreuz & 
Belvedere ... . 


Frl. E. Helbling 


Silvretta & Kurhaus 
Vereina 


Meisser, Stubi & Co ... 
C. Hew, dir 


Wiesental 


M. & E Meisser 


KLOSTERS-DORFLI 
Kurhaus Klosters- 
Dorfli 


H. Marugg 


KNUTWIL 
Stahlbad Knutwil 

KUSNACHT (Zurich) 
Sonne 


O. Troller 


Guggenbuhl-Muller 

P. Zeltner 
A. Truttman 


KUSSNACHT A RlGI 

Adler 
du Lac-Seehof 


Mons6jour 


B . Schneeberger 
A. Bantld-Marquis.. 


LA CHAUX-DE-FONDS 
Fleur-de-Lys 

LANDQUART 
Landquart & 


P. Jager-Ritter 


LANGENBRUCK 
Kurhaus 


Sch western Renggli 
R Eymann 


LANGENTHAL 

Bar en 


LAUFENBURG 
Pf auen 


A. Taeschler 







[OW TO SEE SWITZERLAN 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


i 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Sllppor 




5 


LAUSANNE 
Alexandra Grand Hdtel 
Beau-S6jour 


Ch. F. Butticaz 


95 
140 
70 
30 
40 
50 
30 
120 
100 
25 
80 

60 
70 


1 1 1 1 I O 1 I 1 00 OC 
1 1 1 1 1 10 1 I I 10 10 10 I/" 


2. 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
2 
1.75 
1.75 
2.50 
2 

l!?5 
1.75 

2 
2 


5.50 
5.50 
4. 
4. 
4.50 
4. 
4. 
7. 
5.50 
3.50 
5.50 

4.50 
5. 
3.50 
4.50 
4.5C 
5. 
3.50 
6. 
5. 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
5.50 

O 

s!s< 

3.50 

5. 
8. 
6. 
4.50 
4.50 
8. 
8. 


7. 
7. 
5. 
4. 

C 

4^50 

4 

s' 

5.50 
4. 
5.50 

5.50 
6. 
4 

s! 

5. 
4. 
7. 
5. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
7. 

O _ 

4! 

4.50 

6. 
9. 
7. 
5.50 
5.50 
9. 
9. 


R. Pasche, dir 
Driendl & Karrer 


Belv6dere 


Bristol-R6gina 


E. Heer 


Britannia 


Eric Landry 
Mme. G. Ludi 


British 


Pension Byron 
C6cil 


F. Wuthrich 


J. Sumser . . 


Central-B ellevue 


A. Zwahlen, dir 


Pension Clarence. . . 


A. Jaccard 


de la Cloche 

Continental & 
de la Gare 


F. E. Hirschy 




Eden 


W. Erasime 


Pension des Etrangers . . 
Europe 
de France 




30 
60 
50 
60 
25 
100 
80 
32 
11 
35 
124 

250 
28 
40 

75 
320 
100 
50 
60 
190 
130 


3.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 
6. 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

8. 
3.50 
3.50 

L50 


1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

>' 75 

".75 
1.75 
i.75 

2.50 
1.75 
1.75 

.75 
2.50 

!75 
2.50 
2.50 


J. Jacob 

A. Regamey 


de Lausanne 


R Stettler 


Merc6des 


A. Kupli 


Mirabeau 


A. Haeberli, dir 
B. Bisinger 
Mile. A. Mathier 
F.Koch 
E. Werner-Schori 
Baudenbacher, dir. . . . 

A.. Steiner, dir. gn 


Modern Jura-Sim plon. . 
Pension Mon-Repos. . . . 
Pension Munichoise .... 
National 


dela Paix 


Lausanne- Palace- 
Beausite 




W Kohl 


Voyageurs 


E. Schweitzer 
A. Am, fils 


LAUSANNE-OUCHY 

Balmoral 


Beau-Rivage- Palace. . . . 
Meurice 


O. Egli.dir 
A. Guzzoni 


Mont Fleuri 


W. Steffan 


du Pare 
Royal 
Savoy 


E. Lenz 
A. Auber, dir 
J. Sumser 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



53 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum-Rates 


I 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


J 


LAUTERBRUNNEN 
Adler 


Chr. von Allmen . . 


70 
30 
60 
25 

20 
30 

35 
95 

30 

200 
100 

46 
40 

120 
30 

105 
70 


4. 
3.50 
4.50 
3.50 

4.50 
3.50 

3.50 
4.50 

3.50 

5. 
4. 

3.50 
3.50 

4.50 
3. 

7. 

4. 


1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 

2. 
1.50 

1.75 
1.75 

2. 

2. 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

2.50 
1.50 

2.25 
2 


A 

3^50 
5.50 
3.50 

5. 
3.50 

4. 

4.50 

4.50 

5. 
4.50 

4. 
3.50 

5.50 
3.50 

6.50 
5. 


5. 
4. 
6.50 
4. 

-r ^^ 

4.50 

4.50 
5.50 

5. 

6. 
5.50 

4. 

6.50 
4. 

7.50 
6. 


Silberhorn 


Chr. von Allmen 


Steinbeck .... 


Wwe. E. Gurtner 


Weisses Kreuz 

LAUTERBRUNNEN- 
TRUMMELBACH 
Trummelbach 

LEISSIGEN 


Chr. Stucki 


Frau M. Fischbacher. . . 
G. Messerli-Oberli 


LENK 
Krone 


Parkhdtel Belle vue 

LENS 
Bellalui 


S. Perrollaz 


F. Bagnoud 


LENZERHEIDE 
Kurhaus 


L. Cantieni, dir 


Schweizerhof 

LENZERHEIDESEE 
Valbella 


F. Brenn 

J. L. Caviezel 
D. Oswald 


Waldheim 


LE PONT 
Lac de Joux 


P. Braegger 


LE SEPEY 
Mont d'or 


H Tenthorey 


LES AVANTS 
Grand H6tel 


Corboud, dir .... 


Jaman . . . 


A- Nicodet-Dufour 





54 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 




Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minima m Rates 


i 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Suoper 


I 


< LES BRENETS 
Chateau des Fretes .... 


Vve. M. Scheurer 
Mme. J. Schmid 


30 
25 

98 
140 

200 
95 
145 
150 
120 

15 

65 

15 
20 
45 
70 
20 

100 
10 
12 

45 
12 
25 
12 
35 
200 


3. 
3. 

3.50 

e 

5. 
6. 
8. 

3. 

A 

3. 
3.50 
4. 
3. 

7. 
3. 

3.50 
3. 
4. 

^ 


1.50 
1.50 

1.75 
2. 

2.50 
2. 

2. 

1.75 

2. 

1.75 
2. 
2. 
1.75 

2.25 
1.80 

1.75 
1.75 

1.80 
2.25 


3.50 
4. 

4.50 
5. 

6. 
6. 
10. 

3.50 

4. 

4.50 
5. 
5. 
3.50 

6.50 
4. 

4.50 
4. 

4. 
6.50 


4. 

5. 

4.50 
6. 

7~~ 
6 
10. 

4. 

5. 

5. 
5.50 
6. 
4. 

7.50 
3.50 

5. 
4.50 

4. 

7.50 


LES RASSES 
Beau-Regard & 
Mont Fleury . . . 


L. Junod-Brouilhet 
E. Baierl6 . ... 


Grand Hdtel des Rasses 

LEYSIN 
Belvedere 




Clinique Les Chamois . . 
Chamossaire .... 


H. Dequis, dir 
E. Ruf enacht, dir 
A. Hasenfratz, dir 


Grand H6tel 
Mont-Blanc 

LlGERZ 

Kreuz 


P. Jard, dir 
R Teutsch 


LOCARNO 
Belvedere 


Franzonifreres 
H. Knoblauch 


Pension Villa Daheim . 
Pension Erika. . . 
du Lac 


H. Bach 
G. Mantel 


Metropole au Lac 
Torretta 


J. Bucher 

Steffanina-Moser 


LoCARNO-MlNUSIO 


Th. Plattner, dir 


Pension Graf 
Pension Schelling 


C. F. Nacke 
Frl. A. Schelling 


LOCARNO- M URALTO 
Beau-Rivage 


Fam. Trepp 
B. Behr 




Pension Villa Cameha. . 
Pension Villa Frida. . . . 
de la Gare 


C. Sigg-Tobler 
E.& H. Burgermeister. . 
Fam. Schenker 
A. R. Peytrignet, dir. . . . 


Grand H6tel Palace.... 




A scene of simple domestic life in the Valaisan Alps 




The Matterhorn, seen from the Gornergrat Railway 
Fhot. Schnegg 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



55 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


H 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


| 

5 


LOCARNO- MURALTO 
(continued) 


L. Baumann 
Frau L. Stucki . . 


12 

12 

12 
30 
130 
30 
100 
20 
15 
12 

8 
25 
15 
20 
65 

120 
90 
100 

80 

24 
87 
99 
140 
125 
28 
35 
60 
160 


7 

3.50 
3. 



4! 
5. 
3. 
3. 
3. 

3. 

3. 
6. 

5. 
5. 
5. 

3. 

3. 

4. 
4. 
6. 
6. 

4. 
6. 


1.50 

1.80 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
2. 

2. 
2. 
2. 

1.75 

1.50 
2. 
2. 
2 

2! 

1.75 
2. 


3.50 

A 

3\5Q 

4. 
5. 

3.50 
3.50 
4. 

3.50 

3.50 
5. 

5. 

5. i 
5. 

3.50 

3.50 
4.50 
4.50 
6. 
6. 

4. 
6. 


4. 

.4 
4. 
6. 
4.50 
6. 
4.50 
4. 
4.50 

4. 

4. 
6. 

6. 
6. 
6. 

4. 

4. 
5. 
4.50 
7. 
7. 

5. 
7. 




Pension M Oiler 
(Villa Palmiera) 
Pension Villa Muralto. . 
du Pare 
Quisisana 


H. Meier-Muller 
E. Salvi-Steiner . . . 


M. Hagen 
U. Schallibaum 




C.A. Reber 




L & p Kunz 




F. Kleinhanss .... 


Zurcherhof 


During & Hunziker 


LOCARNO-ORSELINA 
Pens. Villa Montevideo. 
Kurhaus Orselina 
Pension Planta 
Pension Al Sasso 
Kurhaus Victoria . . . 


Wwe. Isaak-Ruesch 
J. & L. Ruch 
M. Bolli-Jost 
Dr. Haslebacher 

K. Hauser, dir. gn 
K. Hauser, dir. gen 
K. Hauser, dir. g6n 

Fam. Niederhauser 

Frau A. Eulenberger 
C. Troxler 


LOECHE-LES-B AINS 

des Alpes 


Bellevue et dependances 
Maison blanche & d6p. . 

LOSTORF 

Bad Lostorf 


LUCERNE 
Adler 


des Alpes (Alpenh6tel) . 
Alpina & Moderne 
Balances & Bellevue. . . . 


G. Wolflisberg 


T Haecky 


C. Giger 


Pension Beau-Sejour. . . 
Belle-Rive 


Vve. Vaucher 
M. Fickel 
Ed. Steinegger 


Carlton Hdtel Tivoli . . . 


Neukomm & Gehrig .... 



56 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


I 


I 


8* 

11 

3 5 


5. 
6. 
4. 
5. 
5. 
4. 
5.50 
4.50 
4.50 
7. 

4. 

carte 

7.50 
4. 
4.50 
4. 

7 -- ^ 
7. 
6. 
6. 

. *^~" 

12. 
4.50 
5. 
10. 
5. 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 

7^- 
5.50 
4. 


LUCERNE (con.) 
Central 


E. Krebs 


70 
50 
55 
45 
60 
15 
60 
18 
45 
220 
150 
28 
30 
35 

300 
30 
70 
25 
210 
200 
70 


4. 
5. 
3.50 
4. 
4. 
3. 
5. 

-1 

3^50 
>. 

3. 
3.50 

3.' 
4. 
3. 

>. 


1.75 
2. 
1.75 

.75 

l'.75 

'.75 
.75 

.75 
.75 

.50 
.50 

!75 


5. 

e 

4! 

4. 
5. 
4. 
4.50 
3.50 
4.50 
6. 

4. 
carte 

6.50 
3.50 
carte 
4. 
6. 
5.50 
5. 
5. 
6.50 
10. 
4. 

8.' 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

A 

6. 

4.50 
4. 


Chateau & Gutsch 
Concordia 


J. Husler 


J. P. Wyss-Zemp 


Continental 


X. Suter 


Diana 
Drei Konige 


J. Muller 
Jak. Bosshard . . 


Eden 


A. Muth 


Einhorn 

Engel 


J. Fenner 


W. Helfenstein 


Europe 


Rich. Matzig 
Frau M. Pietzker 
Familie Vogel 


Pension Felsberg 
Pension Friedau 


Fritschi 




Furke 


Werner Broglie .... 


Grand Hotel & Gotthard 
Terminus 
Hirschen 


W Doepfner 


Edwin Haegi 


Jura 


G Haas 


Krone... 


J. Zimmermann 


duLac 


Spillmann & Sickert .... 
3. Hauser 
W. Amstad 


Luzernerhof 


Minerva 


Monopol & M6tropole. . 


R. Stierlin, dir 
A. Schramli-Bucher 


220 
148 
405 
80 
50 
320 
30 
30 
25 
21 
30 
24 
35 
8 
80 
110 


6. 
8. 

1. 

>'.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

,.50 


!25 
.50 
.75 
.75 
3. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2 

1.75 

") 

l'.75 


National 
du Nord 


A De Micheli dir 


Fam. Gurtner 


de la Paix 




Palace . . 


Bucher-Durrer 


Park 


Alfred Boll 


Pfistern 
du Pont 




D. Mettler 


Post 
Raben am See 
Rebstxxtk 


Frl. Anna Berner 
C Waldis 


E. Danioth 


Pension Richemont .... 
Pens. Rosenblatt 
Royal . 


Frau B. Bayer 
B. Rosenblatt 


H. & M. Tschupp 
E.Meyer 


Rossli 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



57 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


H 


1 
1 


fl 

& 


1 


LUCERNE (con.) 
Rfctli & Rheinischer Hof 

Schiller garni 


A. Disler 


100 


3 50 


1.75 
2. 
2 

2 '.50 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 

2. 

2. 
2. 
2.25 
1.50 
2. 
2 

2. 
2. 
2.50 

2. 

1.75 
2. 
2. 
2.25 
2. 
1.75 
2.50 

2. 


4. 

carte 
6. 

J 

4^50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
4 


4.50 

carte 
7. 

Q --, 

s'. 

5.50 
6. 
5. 
4.50 
4. 

6. 

5. 

5. 
7. 
5. 
5. 
6.50 

4.50 
8. 
5.50 

4.75 
6. 
5. 
7. 
5. 
4. CO 
8. 

6. 




110 
170 
400 
65 
145 
130 
60 
80 
25 

80 

50 
20 
100 
30 
48 
100 

30 
50 
220 
130 

50 
80 
50 
100 
50 
20 
160 

70 


A 

6i 
8. 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 

5. 

3.50 
3. 
5. 
3. 
4. 
4.50 

3.50 
3.50 
6. 
4. 

3.50 
4. 
4. 
5. 
3.50 
3.50 
6. 

4. 


Schwanen & Rigi 


Herrn. Haefeli 


Schweizerhof 
Terrassee 


O. Hauser 


E. Menze-Schenker 
W. Locher, dir 


Union 


Victoria & Engl. Hof . . . 
Wanner 


Alb. Riedweg 


C. Wagner 


Wildenmann 


E. Estermarn 


WinlfplriprJ 


J. Bossert 


4. 
5. 

4.50 
4. 
6. 

5. 
4.50 
5.50 

4.50 
7. 
5. 

4.25 
5. 
4.50 
6. 

4.50 
3.50 
7. 

5. 


LUCERNK-SONN-MATT 

Kurhaus Sonn-Matt. . . . 

LUGANO 
Adler 


Weissenberger, dir 


F. Kappenberger 


Biagcti 
Bristol 


E. Biaggi 
E. Camenzind 


Caldelari . ... 


Martinelli 


Central & Poste 
Continental-Beauregard 
Erica-Schweizerhof 


H. Wyss 
J. Fassbind 


P. Kappenberger 
Hans Gerber 
O. Kienberger, dir 
J. Richard, dir 


Gerber 
Grand H6tel & Palace. . 
International au Lac . . . 
Weiss. Kreuz & 
P. Schiller 


J. Bisinger .... 


Lloyd 


G. Clericetti 


Lugano 


Fam. Brocca 


M6tropole& Monopole. 
Milan-de la Gare 


P. Brocca . . . 


H. Beutelspacher 


Palmiers 


Geschw. Schaer 
Ehret & Zahringer 


Parkhfitel 


St. Gotthard & 
Terminus 


Jean Scheuer 







58 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beda 


Minimum Rates 


| 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


5 


8. 
6. 
5. 

5. 

7. 

5. 
5. 
5. 
4. 
5. 
5. 

5. 
5. 
5.50 
5. 
7. 
4. 
6. 
6. 
6. 
4. 
6. 

4. 
4. 


LUGANO (con.) 

Splendide 


R. Fedele 


120 
150 
48 

70 
100 

40 
25 
40 
10 
70 
20 

60 
35 
60 
28 
100 
25 
120 
70 
65 
26 
70 

20 
20 


6. 
4. 
3.50 

3.50 
5. 

3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3. 
4. 
3.50 

4. 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
5. 
3. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
3. 
4. 

3. 
3.50 


2.50 
2. 
2. 

2.25 

2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
2. 

2 

2! 

2. 
2. 
2. 
1.50 
2. 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
2. 

1.50 
1.75 


7. 
5. 
4.50 

A 

6. 

4- 

4! 

4. 
3.50 
4.50 
4. 

4.50 
4.50 
4.50 

A 

6^ 

3.50 

5i 
5. 
3.50 
5. 

3.50 
3.75 


Garni Walter 


Walter & Cereda 


Washington 


S. Gassmann 
Dr. med Keller 


LUGANO- 

CADEMARIO 

Kurhaus Cademario. . . . 

LUGANO-CASSARATE 
Villa Castagnola au Lac 

LUGANO-CASTAGNOLA 
Eldorado 
Elyse-Villa Singer 


M. Schnyder 


A. Ehlers 
J. Heer-Gmur 


Meurice 


J. Jaggi . 




Sorelle Moeschi 


Kurhaus Monte Br6 


W. Hotz dir 


Schlosshfitel Riviera 


P. Weber 


LUGANO-PARADISO 

Beau-Rivage 
Belle- Rive & Ziebert 
Bellevue au Lac 


E. Huhn 


R. Ziebert 


J. Bonzanigo 


Daetwy ler 


G. Daetwyler 
J. Hugi 
F. Schott 


Eden au lac 
Pension Flora 


Meister 


F. Meister 


de la PaJT.. . 


E. Buhlmann 


Ritschard, 


Otto Ritschard 




O. Amstad. 


Victoria au Lac 
LUGANO- RUVIGLIAN A 


C. Janett 


TJ. Simonetti 


LUGANO-SUVIGLIANA 

Casa Rossa 


E. Thieben-Schneid 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



59 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


i 


i 


Lunch or 
Supper 


c 

I 


LUNGERN 

Alpenhof & Bad 
Kurhaus&Parkhdtel... 
Pension Schynberg 

LYSS 


J.Ming 
J. Imfeld 
A & K Gasser 


40 
140 
25 

30 

80 

75 
120 
30 

45 
300 
35 

45 

50 
50 

40 
32 
80 
25 
90 
33 
70 
35 
48 


3. 

A 

3i 
3.50 

4. 

4. 
5. 
3. 

3. 
7. 

3. 

3. 

4. 
3.50 

3. 

3. 
5. 
3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 


1.50 
1.75 
1.50 

1.75 

1.75 

2. 
2. 

1.75 

1.75 
2.50 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

K75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 


3.50 
4. 
3.50 

5. 

A - 

4.50 
5.50 
4. 

4.50 

7 

4^50 
4.50 

4.50 
4.50 

3.50 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 
4.50 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 


4. 
5. 
4. 

5. 

s 

5. 
6. 
4. 

4.50 
8. 
4.50 

4.50 

4.50 
4.50 

4. 
4. 
6. 
4. 

5.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 


A. Kohler 


MADERANERTAL 
H6tel Schweiz. Alpen- 
klub 


Fam. I nd erg and 


MAGGLINGEN O/BIEL 


Ch. Jungklaus. 


Grand H6tel Kurhaus . . 
Pension Magglingen 

MALOJA 


Sickert-Raisin 


G. Eicher 

L. Kirchner 


Palace 


G. Foxley, dir 




Frau Berns- Meyer 


MANNENBACH 
Schiff 


E. Schelling 


MARTIGNY 
Kluser & Poste 
Gd St-Bernhard 


R. Kluser 
Louis Besse 


MEIRINGEN 
Adler 


C. Moor-Michel 


Bahnhof 


Fam. Anderfuhren 


Bar 


A. Iminer 


Bellevue 


Hermann Ihle 
Ch. Wantz 




Central-Hotel Lowen. . . 
Flora 


F. Abegglen-Moor 
Ulr. Fuhrer 




U. Th6ni 


Krone 


G Urweider 







60 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


| 
* 

| 


Minimum Ratea 


1 


1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


I 


MEIRINGEN (con.) 
Kurhaus Kaltenbrunnen 
Meiringerhof 


Jos. Thoni 

M. Zy bach-Baud 


35 
30 
48 
45 
25 
95 
60 
15 

80 
90 

70 

45 
70 

40 

25 
50 
20 
100 
70 
20 
60 
50 

100 
50 


3.50 
3. 
3.50 
3.50 
3. 

3! 50 
3. 

3.50 
3.50 

3. 

A 

4^50 

4!50 

4. 
> 

6. 

A 

5 . 
5. 

5. 


1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 

1.80 
1.80 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
2. 
1.75 
3.50 
2.25 
1.75 

2. 

2 
2\ 


3.50 
3.50 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
5. 
4. 
3.50 

4. 
4. 

3.50 

4. 
4.50 

3.50 

5. 
5. 
4. 
7. 
6. 
4. 
6. 
5. 

7. 
7. 


4. 
4. 
4.50 
4.50 
4. 
6. 
4.50 
4 

4.50 
4.50 

A _ 

5. 
5.50 

4. 

5. 
6. 
4. 
8. 
7. 
4. 
6. 
6. 

8. 

8. 


Parkhdtel Oberland 
Post. ... 


Chr. Brennenstuhl 


S. Zurfluh 


Rossli 


H. Tannler 


Sau vage- Wildenmann. . . 
Weisses JCreuz 


W. Gunter 
G. Christen-Nageli. . . 




Boss-Naegeli 


MELCHTHAL 
Alpenhof-Bellevue. . . . 


F. Britschgi 


Kurhaus Mclchthal .... 

MENZBERG 
Kurhaus 


Fam. Egger 
Familie Murer 


MERLIGEN 
des Alpes 


Alb. Krebs. . . 


Beat us. 


C. Seegers- Vassal! 


MOHLIN 
Soolbad Sonne 


U. Brenner 


MONTANA 
Alpina. 




du Golf & des Sports. . . 
Pension Mirabeau 


E. Bonvin et frere 
Ferd. Bucher. 


Palace 
du Pare 


W. Honey 
Louis Antille 


Pension du Pas de 1'Ours 
Sanatorium Stephani . . . 


J. L. Romailler 
A. Baroni, gerant 


MONTE GENEROSO 
Bella Vista 
Kulm-H6tel 


Soc. del Mte. Generoso . . 
Soc. del Mte. Generoso . . 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 

or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rate* 


H 


1 
1 


ll 
& 


1 


MONT BARRY 

dcs H&ins 


Mme. J. Bettschen 
M. Cand-Gammeter. . . . 


74 

60 
25 

130 

100 
220 
25 
120 

150 

45 
25 
95 
150 
40 
200 
80 
100 
90 
45 
60 
180 
40 
30 

40 
49 
25 
40 
70 
50 


4. 
4.50 
6. 

5. 
8. 
3.50 
5. 
7. 
5. 
3.50 
3.50 
5. 
7. 
3.50 
8. 
6. 
4. 
5. 
3.50 
4. 
7. 
4. 
3.50 

3.50 
4. 
3. 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 


1.75 
1.75 
2. 

2. 
2.50 
1.75 
2. 
2.50 
2.50 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
2.25 
1.75 
2.50 
2. 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
2.25 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 


4. 
5. 
6. 

5. 
7. 
3.50 
5. 
6.50 
6.50 
4. 
3.50 
5. 
6.50 
3.50 
7. 
5.50 
5. 
5. 
3.50 
4. 
7. 

A 

4! 

3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 


5. 
6. 

7. 

6. 
8 .*~~ 
4. 
6. 
7.50 
7.50 
4.50 
4. 
6. 
7.50 
4. 
8. 
7. 
4.50 
6. 
4.-- 
5. 
8. 
4.50 
4.50 

4. 

4.50 
4. 
4. 
6. 

4. 


MONT PELERIN 
des Alpes 


Clinique de Mon-Repos. 
Grand H6tel Mont- 
Pelerin 


Niess f reres, dir 


MONTREUX 
Continental 

Eden 


W. Deig 
E. Eberhard 


Pension Villa Elisabeth. 
Europe 


Frau v. Thomstorff 
J. & A. Bettschen 
J. C. Bossard, dir. . . . \ 
J. C. Bossard, dir. . . . / 
E. Lutz 


Excelsior. 


Bon Port 


Joli-Mont 


Pension Joli-Site 


Mile. V. Bahler 
Oyex, dir .... 


Lorius . . . 


Monney & Beau-S6jour. 
de Montreux 


E. Borel, dir 


Mme. E. Tschanz 
E. Meuli, dir. 


Montreux-Palace. 


National 


W. Hofer, dir 


du Pare & du Lac 
de Paris 


Fam. J. Schneider 
L. Moinat 


Richemont 


Vve. G. Woerner 


Splendid-Tonhalle 
Suisse& Majestic 
Terminus & de la Gare. 
Victoria. 


E. Reiber 
T. Schori & Cie .... 


Dante Canonica 
Mile. M. Naepflin 

P. Souvairan 
A. Pauly, fils 
A. Arbogast 


MONTREUX-CLARENS 
du Chatelard 
Dent-du-Midi 
Ennitage 


Krtterer 


J Knecht . . 


Mirabeau 


M. B6raneck 


Montbrillant (Baugy) . . 


W. Weber 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 





Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


MONTREUX-CLARENS 
(con.) 
Regis..... 


Mile. C. Maillefer. . , 
E. Brun 


50 
60 

48 

260 
25 
40 

45 
50 
20 
18 
50 

200 
70 

40 
70 

70 
45 


3.50 
4. 

4. 
8. 
4. 

4.50 

4. 
3. 
3.50 
3. 
3.50 

5. 
4.50 

3. 
3.- 

A 

3.50 


1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
2.50 
1.75 
1.75 

2. 
1.80 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 

2. 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 


4. 
4. 

4.50 
7. 
4. 
4.50 

5. 
3.50 
5. 
3.50 
4. 

5. 
5. 

3.50 
3.50 

4. 
3.50 


4.50 

5. 
8. 

4. 
5. 

6. 
5. 
4. 
4. 

5.~ 

6. 
6. 

4. 

4.50 

5.- 
4. 


Royal 


MONTREUX-TERRITET 
Angleteire 


L. Duf our 


Grand H6tel & des Alpes 
Pension Regina 


H. Jaussi, dir 


Vve. B. Gaillard. 


Richelieu 




MONT SOLEIL 
Hotel Mont-Soleil 

MOOSEGG 

Kurhaus . . 


G. Roth 

Fr. Schmalz. 


MORAT 

Couronne 


F. Vollmar 


MORCOTE 

Morcote 


G. Bianchi-Ritter. 


MORGES 

Mont-Blanc. . . . 


G. Bock 


MORGINS 

Le Grand Hotel 
Victoria.. . . 


Alf. Mezentin, adm 
Francois Schmidt 

J P Inderbitzin 


MORSCHACH 
Bellevue 


Degenbalm 

MUHLEN 
Lowe 


A. Immoos . . . 


Ch. Balzer's Erben 
Familie Hodclin 


MUMPP 
Hotel Soolbad Sonne . . . 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



63 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


M 


Breakfast 


ill 


6. 
5. 
5.50 
8. 
5.50 

8. 
5.50 
6. 

5.50 

5.50 
6. 
5.- 
5. 

5. 

4. 
4.- 

4. 
4. 

5.50 
5. 


MURREN 

Belle vue 


F. Muhlemann 


30 

42 
80 
250 
80 

250 
20 
75 

35 

95 
50 
60 
25 

40 

15 
15 

15 
40 

20 
30 


4. 
4. 
4.50 
7. 
4.50 

7. 
4. 
5. 

4.50 

4.50 
5. 
4. 
4. 

4. 

3.50 
3. 

3. 
3. 
4.50 
3.50 


1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2.50 
1.75 

2.50 
1.75 
2. 

1.75 

1.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 

2. 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 


5. 
4.50 
4.50 
7. 
4.50 

.7 
4.50 
5. 

4.50 

4.50 
5. 
5. 
5. 

4.50 

3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 
5.50 
4. 


Edelweiss 


Wwe. L. v. Allmen 
Job. von Allmen 
Max Muller dir 


Eiger 


Grand H6tel& Kurhaus. 
Jungf rau & Victoria .... 
Palace & Gd. H6tel des 
Alpes . . . . 


M. Thoenen 


Ls. Baroni, dir 


Private-H6tel Alpenruhe 


O. Lehmann . 


Chr. Hansen 


MUOTTAS MURAIGL 

Muottas Kulni 


Marie Benz 


. NEUCHATEL 
des Alpes-Terminus .... 
du Lac & Bellevue . . . 


E. Haller 
M. Hafen, dir 


duSoleil& Central 


Familie Jehle 


Vve C. Chollet. 


NEUHAUSEN. 
Belle- Vue am Rheinfall. 

NEUVEVILLE 
Falken 


A Widmer 


H. Gugger 


du Lac 


F. Greine 


NIDAU 
Stadthaus 


E. Laubscher 


NlEDERRICKENBACH 


Fam. von Jenner 


NlESENKULM 

Niesenkvilm , , 


Niesenbahn-Gesellschaf t . 
Emil Meyer 


O BERALP-PASSHOHE 







64 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 1 


Minimum Rates 


1 


Breakfast 


S5 
1| 

3* 


i 


OBERHOFEN 
Kreuz 


H. Reichen 


50 
60 
100 
85 

40 

50 
48 

60 
220 

15 
100 
60 

115 

75 
48 
60 


A 

4.50 
4.50 
4.50 

3. 

4. 

3.50 

3.50 
3. 

2.50 
4. 
4. 


1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.60 

1.75 
1.75 

2. 
2. 

1.80 
1.75 
1.75 

2.25 
2.50 

2. 
1.75 

2. 

2. 
2. 


4. 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 

3.50 

3.75 
3.50 

4. 

6. 

3.50 
4.50 
4. 

5. 

5. 
4. 

4.50 
5. 
4.50 


4.50 
5.50 
5 50 
5.50 

4. 

4.75 
4.50 

4.50 

7. 

4. 
5.50 
5. 

7. 
7. 

5. 
4.50 

5. 
6. 
5.-^ 


Montana. 


Ch. Immer 


Moy 


A. Brugger-Maillat 
B. & O. von Arx. . . 


Victoria.. . . 


OBER-YBERG 

Kurhaus Holdener .... 


Frid. Holdener 


OLTEN 
Aarhof . 


Hans Roth 






PARPAN 


Fam R Michel 


PASSUGG 
Kurhaus Passugg 

PFAFERS 
Adler 




Alfred Kohler 


Bad Pfafers 






Frau Wwe. Surer 

F. X. Furrer, dir 1 
F X Furrer dir / 


PlLATUS-KULM 

Bellevue 
Pilatus-Kulm 


5. 
6. 

3.50 

7 _,_. 

3. 
3.50 
3. 


PIORA 
Kurhaus 


S. Lombardi 


PlOTTA 

de la Poste 


Gobbi freres 


PONTRESINA 
Bernina 


P. Schmidt-Meisser .... 


Pension Villa Collina. . . 
Engadinerhof 


K. Hitz-Beely 
J. P. Fopp 


35 
80 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



65 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


1 

1 
1 


Minimum Rates 


M 


1 


Su 

11 

5* 


1 


PONTRESINA (con.) 
Grand Hotel Kronenhof 
& Bellavista 


L. Gredig .... 


250 
80 
65 
130 
130 
200 
65 
200 
150 
200 
120 
30 
50 

40 
60 

45 

40 
90 
250 
30 
130 
35 
24 
25 
15 
250 
30 
50 
80 
16 
100 


5.50 
4. 
3. 
6.50 
5.50 
5.50 
4. 
5.50 
5.50 
6.50 
4. 
2.75 

-J 

3.50 
3.50 

3.50 

A 

4* 


2.50 
2.50 
2. 

2.50 
2.25 
2.50 
2. 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 

*) - 

l'.75 

1.75 
2 

1.80 

.75 
.75 


7. 
6. 

4.50 
7. 
7. 
7. 
6. 
7. 
7. 
7. 
6. 
4. 
4.50 

4. 

4.50 

A 

4. 
4.50 


8. 
7. 
5. 
8. 
8. 
8. 
.7 
8. 
8. 
8. 
7. 
4.50 
5. 

4.50 
5. 

5. 

5. 
5 50 




Gebr. Gredig & Cie 
J. Muller-Meisser 
C. Saratz Erben 


Muller 
Palace 


Parkh6tel 




Pontresina 


H. Beck, dir 


Rosatch 


Frau D. Caprez 
A. F. Zambail 


Roseg 


Saratz 


Fam. J. Saratz 


Schlosshdtel Enderlin. . . 


U. Credit dir. . 


Steinbock 


C. Saratz Erben 






POSCHIAVO 

Albrici a la Poste 
Weisses Kreuz 


Fam. Albrici 
D. Pitschen-Schmidt 

O. Sutter 


PRAGELZ-PRELES 
Kurhaus Mon Souhait. . 


RAGAZ 
Central 
Villa Flora 


Prl. M. Rist 
J. Weber 


Hof Ragaz 


L. Loeffler.dir 
H. Muller 


6. 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
3. 
3. 
3. 
7. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
3. 
5. 


.25 
.75 
.80 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.25 
'.SO 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 


6. 
4. 
4.50 
4. 
3. 

3! 
6. 
4. 
4. 

4. 
3. 
4.50 


8. 
4.50 
5.50 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.75 
8. 
5. 
5.~ 
5. 
3.50 
5.50 


Krone & Villa Louisa. . . 
Lattrnann 


Gebr. Sprenger 


M6tropole 


A Popp 


National 


Familie Banz 


Ochsen 


J. Kalberer 






Quellenhof 




Rosen garten& Terminus 
St Gallerhof 


F. Walder 


H Galliker 




Frau Wwe. Burer 




F Kempter. 











HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


M 


Breakfast 


l! 


1 


RANDA 


Edm. von Werra 


60 
40 
25 

60 
45 
80 

20 

100 
60 
50 
45 
250 
30 
100 

60 
30 

170 

60 
260 

100 
190 


4. 
4.50 
3.50 

4. 
3.50 
4. 

3.50 

4.50 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
6. 
3.50 
4.50 

4.50 
4.50 

7. 

3.50 
6. 

3.50 
3. 


1.75 

1.75 

1.80 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2.25 
1.75 
2. 

2. 
2. 

2.25 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 


4.50 
carte 
4. 

4. 
3.50 
4. 

3.50 

4.50 
4. 

A 

3 '.50 
6. 
3.50 
4.50 

5. 
5. 

6.50 

4.50 
7. 

4. 
4. 


5.50 
5. 
4.50 

5. 

4. 
5. 

4. 

5.50 
.4.50 
4.50 
4. 
7. 
4. 
5.50 

6. 
6. 

7.50 

5. 
7.50 

5. 
4.50 


RAPPERSWIL 


Albert Buchmann 
J. Murner 


REICHENBACH 
Baren 


REUTI-HASLIBERG 
des Alpes & Confiserie . . 
Kurhaus Hasliberg 
Kurhaus Victoria 

RHEINFELDEN 
Bahnhof 


H. Ulrich 

Fritz Kohler 


K Lutolf 


G. Hochstrasser 
J V. Dietschy Jr 


Dietschy & Krone a. 
Rhein 


Soolbad Drei Konige . . . 
Soolbad Pension Eden. . 
Soolbad Ochsen 
Salinenhdtel im Park. . . 
Schiff 


A. Spiegelhalder 


Fam. Rupprecht 
F. Schmid-Butikofer. . . . 
J. V. Dietschy, Sen 
E. Hafner 


Soolbad Schutzen 

RlEDERALP 

Riederalp. . . . 




Fam E Cathrein. 


Riederfurka 


Fam. E. Cathrein 
A. Bon, A.-G 


RlGI-FlRST 

Rigi-First 


RIGI-KALTBAD 
Bellevue 




Grand H6tel & Kurhaus 

RlGI-KJLOSTERLI 

Schwert 


Th. Rageth, dir . ... 


Jos. Fassbind 


Sonne 









HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



67 



Place and Hotelt 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


I 


1 

cs 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


RlGI-KULM 

Rigi-Kulm Hdtels 

RlGI-SxAFFEL 

Pension Rigi-Staffel 

RIGI-STAFFELHOHE 
Edelweiss 


H. Schupbach, dir 


500 
150 
20 
35 
35 

60 
20 

100 
90 
25 
20 

40 

110 


5. 
3.50 
3. 
5. 
4. 

4. 
3.50 

4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3. 

3.50 
4.50 


2.50 
1.75 
1.80 

-J 

1.80 

1.75 
1.80 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.50 

1.75 
1.75 


8. 
4.50 
3.50 
6. 
4.50 

carte 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 
4. 
3.50 

4. 
4.50 


8. 
5. 
4.50 
6. 
5. 

5. 
4. 

5.50 
4.50 
5. 
4. 

4.50 
5.50 


H. Schupbach, dir 
Th. Hofmann-Egger .... 


ROCHERS DE NAYE 
des Rochers de Naye. . . 


ROMANSHORN 
Bodan 


Alb. Engeler 


RORSCHACH 
Anker 


L. Kaiser 


Bodan 


Wwe. Holzhauser 
Casper Brog 
Chs. Ammann, dir .... 


ROSENLAUI 


ROTHENBRUNNEN 

Bad& Kurhaus 

ROUGEMONT 

Valrose 


David Andrist 


Rovio 
Pension Monte Generoso 

SAANEN 
Gross. Landhaus & 


..Lina von Landesen. . . . 
F. Hasler 


SAANENMOSER 
Sporth6tel & Kurhaus . . 


R. Wehren 





68 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


1M 


inimum Rates 




I 


j 


Lunch or 
Supper 


i 


SAAS-PEE 
Beau-Site 


Fam. In-Albon 


100 
110 
90 
90 

80 

25 
30 

40 
50 
130 
40 

140 
190 

70 

19 

30 
65 
50 
25 
24 
10 
20 
65 
15 
120 


4. 
5. 
5. 
4.50 

3.50 

3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 
4.50 
4.50 

3. 
6. 

3.50 

3.50 
4. 
5. 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4. 
3. 
5. 


2 J 
2 ".25 
2. 
1.75 

1.75 

1.50 
1.50 

1.75 
1.75 

^ 

r./5 

1.75 
2. 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
2.25 
1.75 
1.80 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.80 
2.25 


4.50 
5.50 
5. 
4.50 

3.50 

3.50 
3.50 

4. 

A 

5.' 
5. 

4.50 
6. 

4.50 

A 

4^50 

4 '.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4.50 
4. 
carte 
3.50 
5. 


5.50 
6.50 
6. 
5.50 

4. 

4.50 
4.50 

4.50 
4.50 
6. 
6. 

4.50 
6. 

4.50 

4. 
4.50 
6. 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4.50 
4. 
5.50 
3.50 
6. 


Grand H6tel 


Fam. S. Lagger. 


Bellevue 




Dom 


Fam. S. Lagger. 


SACHSELN 


Fam. Britschgi 


SALVAN 
Joli-Site 


L. P. D6caillet 






SAMADEN 


N. Tarnuzzer 
Joh. Liss 


Bellevue 




Th. Fasciati 
S. Beretta 


Sporthdtel 


ST-CERGUE 
Auberson 


E. Auberson, c5r 


Observatoire 

STE-CROIX 
d'Espagne 

St. GALL 

Bahnhof 


E. Auberson, dir 


F. Stehte 
Ch. Wekerle 


Gallushof 


H. Grob-Heiniger. . . . 


Hecht 


A. Jost-Balzer 


NeuesHdtel Hirschen.. 
Ilge 
Weisses Kreuz 
H6tel-Pension z. Nest . . 
Ochsen 
Schiff 


Karl Butz 


Wilh. Spirig 
Thomas Meyer 


Hans Tobler-Kern 
W. Hoyler 
C. Glinz 
W Waldner 


Walhalla-Terminus 


R. Mader, dir 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



69 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


i 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


i 


ST. GALL-OBERWAID 


Karl Berger. 


120 
100 

35 

60 
70 

40 

100 
80 
200 

380 
300 
40 
350 
300 

100 
100 
75 
200 
80 
160 
50 
70 

380 


4 50 
3.50 
4. 

4. 
4. 

4. 

4. 
4. 
6. 

8. 
8. 
4. 
8. 
8. 

4. 
6. 
4.50 
10.- 
6. 
10.- 
4. 
6. 

10.- 


2. 

2. 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

2. 

2. 
2. 

2.25 

2.50 
2.50 
2. 
2.50 
2.50 

2. 
2.50 
2.50 
3. 
2.50 
2.50 
2. 
2. 

2.50 


4. 
5. 
5. 

4. 
4. 

4.50 

6. 
5. 
7. 

7. 
7. 

5.50 
7. 
7. 

5.50 
7.50 
6. 
12. 
7. 
8. 
5.50 
6. 


5. 
5. 
4.50 

5. 

S 

5.50 

7. 
6. 

o __ JMI 

9. 

O -T-.J 

6! 
9. 

O 

6. 
8.50 
7. 
15. 
8. 
10. 
6. 
7. 

10. 


ST. GOTTHARD 
Monte Prosa 




ST-IMTER 
des XIII Cantons 

ST-Luc 
Bela Tola & St-Luc 


H. Guhl 

Gabriel Pont 


du Cervin. 


Fam. B. Antille 


ST. MARIA 
(MUNSTERTAL) 
Schweizefhof 


C. O. Conradin. 


ST. MORITZ-BAD 
Bellevue au Lac 




Central 


Ch. Bernhard 
Hornbacher's Erben.. . . . 

H. Amsler dir 


Engadinerhof 


Kurh. & Gd. H6tel des 


du Lac 


M. Monsch, dir 


National . ... 


Fr Wissel 


Neues Stahlbad. 


Hltb. Frick, dir 


Virtoria^ ... 


ST. MORITZ-DORF 

Albana 


J. De Giacomi 


Belvedere 
Calender 


Job. Schorn, dir 
S Calender & Co. 


Carlton 
Caspar Badrutt 
Kuranstalt Chantarella. 
Edelweiss . ... 


C. Manz, dir 
Caspar Badrutt 


E Thoma-Badrutt. 


S. Pprmann. 


Eden 




EnRadinerkulm & New 
Kulm. 


Louis J. Bucher, dir 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


I 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


ST. MORITZ-DORF 

(con.) 
Pension Gartmann 
Grand H6tel St. Moritz. 


P. Th6ny-Gartmann . . . . 
F. Devantay, dir 


45 
400 
110 
75 
220 
110 
40 
65 
40 
70 

120 
40 
100 


3.50 
10.- 
4. 
5. 
10.- 
4.50 
4.50 
5. 
3.50 
6. 

7. 

A 

3 50 


1.75 
2.50 
2 

2'.50 
3. 
2.50 
2.50 
2. 
2! 
2.50 

2.50 
2. 

2 

2!so 

2.50 
1.75 
2 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.80 

2. 


4.50 
8. 
5.50 
6. 
8. 
6. 
6. 
6. 
4.75 
8. 

7.50 
4.50 
5. 
10. 
6. 

A 
^ 

4. 
4. 

carte 
4.50 
4. 

5. 


5. 
10. 
6. 
7. 
10. 
7. 
7. 
-j 

5.50 
10. 

8.50 
5. 
6. 

12. 
7. 

5. 
6. 
4.50 

5. 

4.50 
carte 
4. 
4. 

6. 




Monopol. ... 




Palace 


H. Badrutt 


Neues Posth6tel 


E. Matossi, dir 


Privat-H6tel 


Badrutt, Knaus & Co. . . 
G Gier6 




St. Moritzerhof 
Savoy 


J. Zimmerli 


Schweizerhof-H6tel 
Suisse . . . 


Ad. Angst, dir 
Frau M. Barfuss 
P. Steffani 


Sporth&tel 


Steffani 


Suvretta-Haus 
Waldhaus 


Gebr. Bon 
Giorgio Rocco 

A. Stettler- Walker 
J. Huhn, Jr '..... 
C. Schnepf 
C. Spinas 


350 
65 

20 
14 

% 

25 
60 

40 
40 
40 
20 

145 


10.- 
5. 

3.50 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 

5. 


ST. PETERSINSEL 
Kurhaus St. Petersinsel 

SAN SALVATORE 
Vetta S. Salvatore 

SARNEN 
Obwaldnerhof 


SAVOGNIN 
Kurhaus Piz Michel. . . . 

SCHAFFHAUSEN 

Bahnhof & Ruden 
Mullen . . 


W.A.Graf 
Familie Hirsch 
Ch. Schulthess 


National 


Tanne 




SCHEIDEGG, KLEINE 
Kurhaus Belle vue 


Gebr. Seiler 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



71 



Place and Hole 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


1 


Breakfast 


I! 


i 


SCHINZNACH 

Bad Schinznach 


H. Senn, dir 1 


200 

120 

200 

100 
40 
140 
40 
75 
25 
70 

25 

65 

40 
250 
40 
40 

48 

45 


5. 
3. 

4. 

5. 

4.50 
4. 
5. 
5. 
4. 

1 

4 '.50 
3. 

4.50 

3. 
4.50 
3. 
3. 

3.50 
3.50 


2. 
1.75 

1.75 

2. 

2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 

l'.75 
1.50 


5. 
3. 

4. 
6. 

5.50 
4.50 
6. 
4.50 
5. 
4. 
5. 

4. 

4.50 

3.50 
5. 
3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 


6. 
4. 

5. 

7. 

6.50 
6. 
7. 
6. 
6. 

C _ 

6^50 
4.50 

5.50 

4.50 
6. 
4. 
4.50 

4. 

4. 


Pension Habsburg 

SCHONBRUNN BAD 

Wasserheilanstalt . 


H. Senn, dir / 
Geschw. Hegglin 
C. Borsinger, dir . . 


SCHONECK 


SCHULS-TARASP 
Belvedere. 


M. Liss-Kaiser, dir 
E. Bigler .... 


Bigler 




J. Frei & Fam 


Hohenfels ... 


E. Bigler 


Post. 


M. Liss-Kaiser, dir 


Pension Valentin 
Victoria 


A. Valentin 
Fulli6&Cie 


SCHWANDEN 

Schwanderhof 


J. Schonenberger . . 


SCHWARZWALD-AJLP 
Kurhaus Schwarzwald- 
alp 


Ulr. Thoni 


SEELISBERG 
Ldwen 


Ad. Hunziker 
P. Haertl.dir 


Sonnenberg & Kurhaus . 
Waldegg 


Truttmann-Reding 
Fam. G. Truttmann 

Frau C. Beeler 


Waldhaus-RutlL 


SEEWEN 
Badhfitel Rossli 

SEEWIS i. PRATTIGAU 


Lietha & Walser 







72 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Ratea 


I 


1 


I S 
If 

3 


1 


SENT 
Rhatia. 


V. Denoth, gerant 


25 
120 

20 
30 
90 
30 
18 

20 
55 

12 
130 

120 
120 
150 
10 
35 
250 

70 
90 
90 

30 
70 


3.50 
3.50 

3.- 
3.50 
5. 
4.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 

3. 

5. 

5. 

C 

6! 
4.50 
3.50 
7. 

3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

3.50 
5. 


1.75 
1.75 

1.80 
1.50 
2. 
1.75 
1.50 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
2. 

2. 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
2.50 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.50 
2.25 


3.50 
4. 

M _ _ 

3!so 

6. 
4. 
4. 

4. 
4. 

3.50 
6. 

5. 
6. 
6. 
4.50 
4. 
6. 

4.50 
4.50 
3.50 

3.50 
5.50 


4. 
5. 

4. 

4.50 
7. 
5. 
4.50 

4.50 
4.50 

4. 

7. 

6. 
7.50 
7. 
5.50 
4.50 
8. 

4.50 
4.50 
4. 

4.50 
6.50 


SERNEUS 




SIERRE 
Arnold 


P Arnold 


Pension Villa Baur .... 


Marie Bauer 


Chateau Bellevue 
Terminus 


E. Haldi, dir 
Louis Oggier 


Victoria. 




SlGRISWIL 

Alpenruhe 
Baren 


A. Scholl 
H. Obrist-Boss 


SlLS-BASELGIA 

Pension Chaste 
Margna. 


P. Godly 


SILS-MARIA 
Alpenrose 


R. Fonio, dir 


Barblan. 


E. Christen, dir 


Edelweiss 


L. Cadonau, dir 
F. Hanselmann. 




Silserhof 


H Gabriel 


Waldhaus 


O. Xienberger, dir 


SlLVAPLANA 

Engadinerhof 
Posth6tel & Riv Alta 


Th Plattner dir 


P. Heinz 




P. Kieni & Casty 


SlMPLON-DoRF 

Ac la Poste 


Gentinetta-Kluser .... 


SlMPLON-KtTLM 

Bellevue 


O. Kluser 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



73 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beda 


Minimum Rates 


1 


I 


Lunch or 
Supper 


Dinner 


SlSIKON 

Rophaien 


Familie Zwyer 


35 

20 
60 
35 
30 

200 

150 
20 

60 
60 
25 
70 
97 
36 

110 
74 
24 
30 
10 
115 
15 

72 
46 


3. 

3.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 

3.50 
4. 

5. 
3.50 

4. 
4.50 
4. 

5. 
5. 
4. 

5. 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4. 
5. 
3.50 

3.50 
4. 


1.75 

1.75 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

9_ 

2. 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 

2. 
I! 75 

2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

^ 

l'.75 
1.75 
1.75 


3.50 

3.50 
5. 
4.50 
4.50 

4. 

5. 

5. 
4. 

4.50 
4.50 
4. 
5. 
5. 

A 

5. 
4.50 
3.50 
3.50 

5~- 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 


4. 

4.50 
6. 
5. 
5. 

5. 
6. 

6. 
4.50 

r _ 

s'.so 

4.50 
6. 
6. 
4.50 

6. 
5.50 
4. 
4. 

6~^- 

4.-^ 

5.50 
4.50 


SOLEURE 

Adler. 


Ernst Uebersax 


Krone 


F. & M. Nussbaum 
H. Pauk-von Burg. . . . 


M6tropole 


Terminus 

SOMVIXERTAL 

Tenigerbad. 


G.Abel 

St Caplazi dir \ 


Waldhauser 


St. Caplazi, dir / 


SONNENBERG 

Kurhaus 


Alb. Riedweg 


SPEICHER 
Kurhaus Vogelinsegg. . . 

SPIEZ 
des Alpes 
Bahnhof-Terminus . . . . 
Bellevue 
Strandh6tel Belvedere . 
Parkh6tel Bubenberg. . 
Erica 
Grand Hotel & Spiezer- 
hof 
Kurhaus & Blumlisalp. . 
Lotschberg 


H. Maurer-Schiess .... 


E. Stegmann 


Fam. Mutzenberg 
H. Stauffer 


J. Dorer-Baumer 


Wwe. S. Barben 


A. Bandi-Engemann . . . . 

Gebr. John 
F. Zolch 
M. Barben. 


Niesen. . . 


H. Rebmann 


Schlossli 


Fam. Bruckner 
Fam. Mutzenberg 
Geschw. Kupferschmid. . 

Ed KODD 


Schlossh6tel Schonegg . . 
Pension Villa Seerose. . . 

SPLUGEN 
Bodenhaus & Post 

STAFELALP 

Kurhaus Stafelalp. . . 


E. Berner.. . 



74 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 







CO 


Minimum Rates 


Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 


3 




S 


s s 


5 




or Manager 


j 


H 


1 


11 


1 


STALDKN 














Stalden & Bahnhofbuffet 


Fam. S. Lagger 


40 


4 


1.75 


4 


5 


STANS 














Stanserhof 


Fam. Flueler-Hess .... 


20 


3 50 


1.75 


3 50 


4 


STANSERHORN 














Stanserhom-Kulrn 




100 


5 


2 


5 


6 


STANSSTAD 














Winkelried 


R. Husler 


40 


3 50 


1 75 


4. 


4 50 


SUNDLAUENEN 














Beatushohle 


Ad. Glauser 


35 


3 


1 50 


3.50 


4 


SURLEJ B. SlLVAPLANA 














Pension Waldheim 


R. Domeny 


25 










SURSEE 
















L6onard Wust 


15 


3 


1 50 


3.50 


4 


SUSTENPASS 














Steingletscher 


Fam. O. Jossi 


50 


4.50 


1.75 


4.50 


5.50 


TARASP 














Kurhaus Tarasp 


Ch. Binggeli, dir 


350 


6. 


2.50 


6. 


7.50 


TELLSPLATTE 














Tellsplatte 


Fam. J. P. Ruosch 


50 


3.50 


1 7S 


3.50 


4. 


TENIGERBAD. See Som- 














vixertal. 














TIRRITET. See Mon- 














treux. 














TENNA 














Aloenblick 


Th. Buchli 


60 


3. 


1.50 


3.50 


4. 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



75 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


j 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


4.50 
4.50 

6. 

6. 
4. 
5. 

7. 
4. 
5.50 
6. 

5. 
6. 
5.50 

7. 
6. 

5.50 

5. 
4.50 

4.50 
4.50 


TEUFEN 
Linde. 


Emil L,anker .......... 


20 
30 

50 
125 
30 
60 

200 
25 
50 
100 

40 
60 
35 

22 
60 

50 

70 
50 

15 
35 


3. 

4. 

5. 
5. 
3.50 
4. 

7. 
3. 
4. 
5. 

4. 

4.50 
3.50 

3.50 
3.50 

4. 

4. 
3.50 

3.50 
3. 


1.75 
1.80 

2. 

2. 
1.75 
1.80 

2.25 
1.75 
2. 
2. 

1.75 
2. 
1.75 

2. 
1.75 

2.25 

1.75 
1.50 

1.80 
1.75 


carte 
4. 

5. 
5. 
3.50 
4. 

6. 
3.50 
4. 
5. 

4.50 
4.50 

A 

4. 
4. 

5. 

4. 

3.50 

3.50 
4. 


THOUNE 
Baren 


Frau Bahler 


Beau Rivage & 
Terminus 


Engel-Gartenmann- 
Moegle. 


Bellevue & du Pare 
Blaukreuzhof 
Falken. 


H. Schenck, dir 


Fr. Zahler, dir 
Sommer & Brupbacher . . 

H. Schenck, dir 


Grand H6tel & Thuner- 
hof . 


Pens. Obere Wart 
Schlossh6tel Freienhof . . 


Hans Oesch-Kunz 
Fam. Haase 


Victoria & Baumgarten. 

THUSIS 

Wpi^p* TCretiz 


E. Burkhalter, dir 


A. Schollkopf 


Posth6tel 




Splugen. . 


C. Graber 


TlKFENKASTEL 

Albula. 


Chr. Schnoller 


Julier & Post 


St. Bossi 


TORRENTALP 

Torrentalp 


Zen Ruffinen & Willa . . . 


TRIENT 
Grand H6tel 


Glacier-du-Trient 

TROGEN 
Krone 


G. Gay-Crosier 
Ernst Bohm 


TWANNBERG 
Kurhaus 


Ida Wullschleger 







76 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotef 


Ptoprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


M itifmum Rmes 


M 


Breakfast 


ill 


i 


UNTERAGERI 
Seefeld 


L. Zumbach 


40 
40 

45 

60 
60 

145 
60 

60 
28 
100 
48 
130 
20 

80 
60 
25 
20 

40 
50 

180 
160 


3.50 
3. 

3. 

3. 
3.50 

5. 
5. 

4. 
3.50 
5.50 
4.50 
7. 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 

3~^- 

3. 
3.50 

6. 

5. 


1.75 
1.75 

? 

1.50 

1.75 

2.50 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
2. 
1.75 
2.25 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 
1.75 

2. 
2. 


3.50 
3.50 

4. 

3.50 
3.50 

6.50 
6. 

4. 

4. 
5.50 
5. 
7. 
4. 

4.50 
4.50 

4. 

4. 
4. 

6. 

6.50 


3.50 

4. 

5. 

4. 

4 . 

7. 

7. 

5. 
4.50 
7. 
5.50 
8. 
4. 

5. 
5. 

4. 

4.50 
4. 

7. 
8. 


Waldheim 




URNERBODEN 
Tell & Post. 


Pamilie Muheim 
Ph Schnyder 


VALS 
Adula 


Kur- & Badanstalt 
Therme. 


Schnyder & Albin. 


VAL SINESTRA 
Kurhaus Val Sinestra. . . 

VERMALA 
Forest-H6tel 


P. Pester, dir 




VEVEY 
Beau-S6jour. . 


J. Otto Steffen 


delaGare 
du Lac 


A. Meng 
A. Riedel 


Nuss 


L. Nuss 


Trois Couronnes 
Trois Bois. 


J. F. Kupfer, dir . . 


Mile. M. Maeder 


VEVEY-LA TOUR 
des Alpes 


W. Kcehler, dir 


Pension Comte 


A. Comte. 






Pension Miremont 
VEVEY-ST-LEGIER 


G. Badel 


du Roc 


C . Schertenleib 


VILLARS S/OLLON 
Le Grand H6tel 


Oscar Jeanloz 
Ch. Genillard, dir. 


Muveran. 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



77 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


H 


1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


VlLLARS (con.) 

Villars Palace 


Ch. Genillard dir. 


220 
115 

140 
50 
50 

35 
26 
20 
80 
140 
28 
25 
90 

44 

40 
575 

30 
50 
60 


7. 
5. 

6. 
3.50 
3.50 
3. 

3 

3! 
3.50 
7. 
3.50 
3. 
5. 

3. 

3.50 
6. 

3.50 
4. 
3. 


2.25 

2. 

2. 
1.50 
1.75 

.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
2.25 
.75 
.75 

1.75 

2. 

2.50 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 


6.50 
5. 

6. 
3.50 
4. 
4. 

A 

s'.so 

4. 
6.50 
4. 

A 
C 

3.50 

4. 
6. 

4. 
4. 


8. 
6. 

7. 
4.50 
4.50 

4. 

4. 
4. 
5. 
8. 

5. 
4. 
6. 

4. 

7.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.- 


du Pare 


J. Dumont-Melly 
J Fugner, dir 


VlLLENEUVE 

Byron 


VlEGE 

de la Poste 


L. Providoli 


VISSOYE 
d'Anniviers 


Louis Jossen .... 


VITZNAU 
Alpenrose 


Albert Lang 


Pension Handschin 
Pension Braun. 


Julius Handschin 


Wwe. Braun 






Park-Hdtel 
Rigibahn 
Pension Unterwylen 
Vitznauerhof 


A.BonA.-G 
Ad. Huber-Blesi 
Pr. Wittwer-Mori 
A. Bon A.-G 


VORDERMEGGEN 

Villa St Charles 




VULPERA-TARASP 
Pension Silvana 
Waldhaus & Schweizer- 
hof. 


Schwest. Scheibler 
G. Pinosch, dir 


WADENSWIL 
Eneel. 


Alfred Muller 


WALCHWIL 


A. Schwyter-Worner 
Alb. Joos-Pohl 


WALZENHAUSEN 







78 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


K 


Breakfast 


Lunch or 
Supper 


1 


WASSEN 
des Alpes 


Carl Gerig 


40 
40 

17 

80 
60 

70 
40 
49 

90 
90 
50 
42 
50 
40 
40 
20 
52 
115 
130 
60 
40 
40 
45 
49 
30 

25 
60 


3.50 
3.50 

3. 

3. 
3. 

4. 
3. 
3.50 

4.50 
4.50 
4. 
3.50 
4. 
4 

4! 

3.50 
3.50 

4!50 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
3. 

3.50 
4. 


2. 
2. 

1.50 

1.75 
2. 

1.75 
2. 

2 


4. 
4. 

3.50 

4. 
4.50 

4. 
5. 

4.50 

5. 

5. 

A 

3^50 
4. 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
3.50 
5.50 
5. 

A 

3^50 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 
3. 

3.50 
4. 


4. 
5. 

A ^^ m 

4.50 
5.50 

5. 
6. 
5. 

6. 
5.50 
4. 
4.50 
S 

5! 

5. 
4. 
4.50 
6. 
5.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
5. 
4.50 
3.50 

4. 

S * 






WATTWH. 
R6ssli 




WEESEN 
<Iu Lac 


H. Ziltener . . 


Rossli 


A. B6hny 


Schlcsshotel 
M ariahalden 


W. Gurtner . . 


Schwert 


B Ziltener. 


Speer. 


H. Hoesly 


WEGGIS 
Albana 


C. Wolf 


2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
1.75 
2.00 

9 

l'.7S 
1.50 

2. 

1.75 


Alpenblick 


Chr. Jung-Muller. . . 


Beau-Rivage & Lowen 


S. Kuchler. 


Buhlegg 




Central 


J. Hofmann. . . . 


Eden 


Geschw. Spicker 


Felsberg 


E. R. Hartisch. . , 


Pension Frohburg 
National 
Parkh&tel Bellevue 
Poet-Terminus. 


A.. Isele 


J. Stalder 
E. Egli 


Geschw. Zimmermann . . 
Arth. Spicker 


Rigi . 


Rossli 




St. Gotthard 




Schweizerhof 


Ed. Zimmermann 


Seehof-du Lac 


Victoria 


J,. M T Hoffmann . , , - , - - 


Pension Zimmermann- 

Schiirch. 


Frau Dr. Zehnder 


WEGGIS-LUTZELAU 
Lutzelau 


K. Bolder 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



79 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


3 


^ 

1 


Lunch or 
Supper 


Dinner 


WEGGIS-LUTZELAU 
(con.) 
Kurh. Bad Hinter- 
liitzelau 


G. Jsot 


30 
30 
25 
85 

140 
45 
67 
50 
160 
42 
45 
80 
25 
90 
120 
40 
20 
120 
220 
90 
140 


3.50 
3. 
3. 
4. 

4. 

4. 
4. 
3.50 

3^50 
4. 
4.50 
3. 
4.50 

l!75 
3.50 
4. 
8. 


1.75 
1.75 
1.50 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2_ 

l!75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.80 
1.75 
2 
4! 
1.75 
1.75 
2.25 

2 


3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

5. 

4. 
4. 
4. 
3.50 
5.50 
3.50 
4. 
4.50 
3.50 
4.50 
5.50 
4. 
3.50 
4. 
6. 
5. 
5.50 
3.50 
5. 

A 

4.50 


4. 
4.50 
4. 
5. 

5. 
5. 
4.50 
4. 
6.50 
4. 
5. 
5.50 
4 ~-- 
5.50 
6.50 
4.50 
4. 
4.50 
7. 
6. 
6.50 
4. 
6. 
5. 

5.50 


WEISSBAD B. APPENZELL 
Belvedere 


Fam. Wick-Kurer .... 


WEISSENBURG-DORF 


C. B laser 


WEISSENSTEIN 
XCurlicms 


K. Illi. 


WENGEN 
Alpenrose & Mittaghorn 
Alpenruhe 
des Alpes 


Feuz & von Allmen 
A. Graf-Steiner 
U. Lauener . .... 


Bellevue 
Grand H6tel Belvedere. 
Breithorn 


Frau A. E. Graf 
F. Olloz-Loosli 
Frau L. Emch 


Bristol. 


Karl Graf 






Central . . 


Ulrich Gertsch 


Falken. 




Grand Hotel Victoria, . . 


Fam. Schoni 


Tungfraublick. . . . 


R. Abbuhl 


Kreuz 




Kurhaus 


Ul. Lauener 


Palace H6tel & National 
Parkh6tel Beausite 
Regina & Blumlisalp. . . 


F. Borter 


Ed. Buhlmann. . 


J. Hiigli 


Schweizerhof 


Frau M. Frutiger 


40 
85 
60 

40 


3.50 
4.50 

1 

4.50 


1.75 
o 

1L75 


Terminus-Silberhorn.. . . 
Waldrand . . . 


rls. Lauener 




WENGERNALP 
Jungfrau 


Peter Lauener. 





80 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



PIae and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


Number of beds 


Minimum Rates 


I 


1 
1 


s. 

J5 & 
w 

3 


i 


WlL 

Bahnhof 


Paul Bernet 


20 

60 
60 
49 
70 
54 

40 
40 
34 

50 

100 
80 

120 
300 
100 
200 
50 
240 
50 

200 

150 
50 
20 


3. 

3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
4. 
3.50 

4.50 
4. 
3.50 

3.50 

4. 
3.50 

7. 
6. 
5. 
5. 
5. 
6. 
4.50 

4^50 
4. 
4.50 
6. 

C 


1.80 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.80 
2.50 
1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

2.25 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
1.75 
2. 
2! 
1.75 
2. 
2.50 
3.50 


3.50 
3.50 
4. 
4. 
4. 

4.50 
4. 
3. 

4. 

5. 
4.50 

6. 
6. 
6. 
6. 
6. 
6. 
5.50 
.5.50 
5. 
4.50 
5. 
6. 
7. 


4.50 

si 

4.50 

5. 
4.50 

4.50 
4. 
3.50 

4. 

6. 
4.50 

7. 
7. 
7. 
7. 
7. 
7. 
6. 
6.50 
5.50 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 


WlLDERSWIL 

Alpenrose 


J. K. Boss 


des Alpes 

Pension Berghof 


Frl. E. & M. Luthi. . . . 
M. Hummler 
Ch. Schwyter-Rolaz 
Fam. Felber 


Schlossh6tel Unspunnen. 
Kurhaus Wilderswil. . . . 

WlNTERTHUR 

Krone 


H. Schellenberg 
R. Bindschedler. , 


Goldener Lowen 
Ochsen 


WORBENBAD BEI LYSS 

Wordenbad 


F. Trachsel 


YVERDON 

des Bains 


Otto Rohrer, dir 
Otto Rohrer 


La Prairie 


ZERMATT 
Beau-Site 


Soc. d. H6tels Seiler. . .. 
Soc. d. H6tels Seiler .... 
Soc. d. H6tels Seiler. . . . 
Soc. d. H&tels Seiler 
Soc. d.Hdtels Seiler.. . . 
Soc. d. Hotels Seiler 
M.julen 
H. Zimmennann, dir. . ) 
H. Zimmennann, dir. . \ 
H. Zimmennann, dir. . J 


Mont Cervin . ... 


Mont Rose. 




Lac Noir (Schwarzsee).. 
Riffelalp 


Riffelberg 
Schweizerhof 


National-Terminus 
Bellevue 


Zermatterhof 


Kulmhotel Gornergrat. . 




Belvedere 









HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



81 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


? 

1 


Minimum Rate* 


H 


Breakfast 


Lanch or 
Supper 


I 

5 


ZINAL 
Diablons 


E. Haldi, dir . 


80 
70 

50 
20 
30 

150 

21 
120 
70 


4.50 
4. 

3.50 
3.50 
4. 

5. 

4. 

7 ---- 
4 50 


2. 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

2 

1.75 
2.50 
1 75 


5. 

5. 

3.50 
3.50 
4. 

5. 

4.50 
7. 

C 

8. 
4. 
4. 
4.50 
7. 
4. 
S 
5. 
7. 
6. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
6. 
4. 
5. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
6.50 


6. 

5. 

A ^ 

4^ 
5. 

6. 

5. 
8 
6. 

9. 
5. 
5. 
5.50 
7. 
4. 
10. 
5. 
9. 
6. 
4. 
5. 
5. 
6. 
4.50 
5 
5. 
4. 

8. 


Durand . . . . 


E. Haldi, dir 


ZUG 

Guggithal 


Jos. Bossard 


Schweizerhof 




Zugerhof 

ZUGERBERG 

Gd. Hfitel & Kurh. 
Schonfek 

Zuoz 
Pension Alpina 
Kurhaus Castell 
Concordia 


A. R. Custer 

G. Kuhn, dir 
H. Huf na^el 


Herm. Gilli & Co . 


G. A. Gilli . . 


ZURICH 
Bauer au Lac 
Pension Beau-Site 
Pension Belvoirpark. . . . 
Central 


F.&H. Kracht 
\.. Elmer-Morlock 
Frau M. Dielmann 
P. Elwert 


240 
22 
12 
100 
110 
25 
170 
25 
96 
100 
30 
25 
90 
150 
30 
90 
60 
90 
35 
150 


8. 
4. 

4^50 
7.50 

'^50 

'.50 
.50 

'.50 
.50 

a 


2.50 
1.75 

2^50 
.75 
2.50 
.75 
2.50 

'.75 
.75 
.75 

'.75 
.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 


City. . . 


A. Bohrer 


Pension Delphin 
Bolder Grand Hotel 
Pension Dolderburg 
Eden au Lac 


. Maurer 
X Keppler, dir 
? rau F. John 


Ed. Kleber, dir 
Hugo E. Prager 


Elite 


Pension Florhof 


Frau L. M ichel 


Pension Fortuna 
Glockenhof 


I. Moecklin 


Habis- Royal 


I. Golden-Morlock 
. Gugolz 
H. Neithardt 
A. Hofmann's Wwe 
Albert Gruler, dir 
lerm. Hasler 
Georges Wild 


Jura 
Limmathof 


Monopol-Simplon 


Mythen 
National 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Place and Hotel 


Proprietor 
or Manager 


V. 



S 


Minimum Rates 


1 


Breakfast 


ll 

! 


1 


ZURICH (con.) 
Neptun 
du Pare. 


F. Steiger-Nageli 
Frau Bertha Voigt 
K. Herzog 


35 
25 
12 
38 
200 
150 
60 
57 
30 
37 
120 
90 


4. 
5. 
3.50 
5. 
5.50 

D 

4. '50 
4.50 
4. 
4. 
8. 
5 


2.50 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
2. 
2.50 
2 
I! 75 
1.75 
1.75 
2.50 


4. 

4.50 

5. 
6. 

J 

si 

5. 
5. 
4. 
j 

6! 
4. 

4. 
6. 

4. 
3.50 
3.50 

A 

4i 


4i50 

5. 
6. 
9. 
6. 
5. 
5. 
4. 
^ 

7.' 
4. 

4.50 
6. 

4.50 
4. 
4. 
4.50 
5. 


Pfauen 


Fam.-Pens. Ritterhaus. . 
St. Gotthard 


Dr. Ad. Ritterhaus. .. . 


Savoy-Bauer en Ville. . . 
Sonnenberg 


S. H. Gottlieb, dir 
Harry Meyer 


Stadthof 


Fridolin Vogel. 


Pension Villa Sternwarte 
Pension Tiefenau . . . 


Frau B Merz 


Frau G. Franz 


Victoria 


A. Kummer-Wenger . . . . 


Waldhaus Colder 


ZURICH-RUSCHLIKON 


Fam. Brunner. 


35 

40 
100 

80 
25 
25 
60 
60 


3.50 

3.50 
5. 

3.50 
3. 

I 

3^50 
4. 


1.75 

1.75 
2. 

1.75 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.75 


ZURICH-UETLIBERG 
Annaburg 
Gd. Hdtel Kurh. Uetli- 


E. Streicher 


Hans Kaser 


ZWEISIMMEN 

Krone- Couronne . . 


J. Schletti-Abegglen 
H. Kauf mann-Moor .... 
Familie Kuhni 


Monbijou 


de la Poste 






Terminus ............. 


J. Hubler 






HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 83 

RAILROADS 

Single tickets are good for one day (day of issue) only. 
Excursion tickets (both ways) have a validity of ten days. 
Children from four to twelve years are charged half fare ; 
over twelve full fare. Parties of from sixteen to sixty 
people, traveling either second or third class, are granted 20 
per cent reduction on the fares and parties numbering from 
sixty-one to one hundred and twenty people are entitled to 
30 per cent, reduction. (See list of fares page 85 to 120.) 

Combined tickets at a reduction of 20 per cent, will again 
be issued from May 1, 1922 on, for journeys of not less than 
400 kilometres. 

The weight of hand luggage is 10 kilos (22 Ibs.) per pas- 
senger. Only small packages are allowed, such as can con- 
veniently be placed in the luggage racks. 

Traveler^ should under no circumstances seek to take into 
the compartments heavy or bulky luggage, but should avail 
themselves of the easier method of having it registered, the 
charge on the Swiss Federal Railroads for carrying the same 
being calculated per 10 kilos (22 Ibs.) per kilometre. 

As a rule, only personal effects, in trunks, gladstone bags, 
etc., can be registered. The following objects can also be 
registered, provided they belong to passengers traveling by 
the same train: Perambulators, invalid chairs, bicycles and 
motorcycles for one person (with benzine or petrol tanks 
properly emptied or electric accumulators removed), skis, 
ordinary luges and toboggans (bobsleighs excepted) ; also 
commercial travelers' sample trunks. The weight of any 
package must not exceed 100 kilos. Exceptionally, articles 
which do not come under this heading are conveyed as reg- 
istered luggage, provided they are not too bulky for convey- 
ance per passenger train and the weight does not exceed 100 
kilos. 



84 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

No luggage is allowed free beyond the prescribed amount 
of hand luggage. 

CUSTOMS 

Entering Switzerland the examination of the baggage takes 
place at the following frontier stations: 

Basle Coming from France, Belgium, 

Germany, Holland or the Scandi- 
navian countries. 

Bouveret Coming from France (Haute 

Savoie). 

Buchs Coming from Austria. 

Campocologno Coming from Italy via Sondrio- 

Tirano, entering the Grisons via 
the Bernina Railway. 

Chatelard Coming from Chamonix over the 

Martigny-Chatelard Railway. 

Chiasso Coming from Italy via the Gothard 

route). 

Constance Coming from southeastern Germany. 

Crassier Coming from France. 

Domodossola Coming from Italy (via Simplon 

route. 

Geneve-Cornavin Coming from France. 

Geneve-Eaux Vives Coming from Chamonix via Anne- 

masse. 

Luino Coming from Stresa (Italy). 

Porrentruy Coming from France via 'Delle. 

Romanshorn Coming from eastern Germany. 

Rorschach Coming from eastern Germany. 

Schaffhausen Coming from northern Germany. 

Singen Coming from northern Germany. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 85 

St. Margrethen Coming from eastern Germany and 

Austria. 
Vallorbe Coming from France to Lausanne 

(Simplon route). 

Les Verrieres (Suisse).. Coming from France to Neuchatel. 
Waldshut Coming from Germany. 

Should the owners of luggage registered through to Aarau, 
Berne, Coire, Lausanne, Lucerne, Lugano, Montreux, St. Gall, 
St. Moritz, Vevey or Zurich not be present at the frontier 
station when the Customs examination takes place, their 
luggage will be sent on to the Customs Offices at these 
stations, where it will be examined. 

RAILWAY FARES 

The Fares given hereafter are for single tickets. An addi- 
tional charge is made for fast express trains as follows: 

I. II. III. 

Fr. Fr. Fr. 
j 50 km i. .75 .50 



51 100 km. 
101 150 km. 
151 200 km. 
201 250 km. 
251 300 km. 
301 350 km. 
OVER 350 km. 



2. I. SO I. 

3- 2.25 1.50 

4. 3- 2.- 

5- 3-75 2.50 

6. 4-50 3- 

/ 5-25 3-50 



86 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 




From 
DA or p 


vu 


Sw 


iss Frai 


ica 


Co 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 


Olten 


8.75 


6.10 


4 00 


Airolo 


Olten-Lucerne 


37 45 


26 10 


17 05 


Altdorf .'.'.'.!!!!!! 


Zurich-Zug 
Olten-Lucerne 


39.30 
24.75 


27.40 
17 25 


17.85 
11.25 




Zurich-Zug 


26.40 


18 40 


12 00 




Koblenz-Gossau 




21 40 


13 95 




Zurich or Koblenz-Gossau 




22.65 


14 80 


Arth-Goldau .... 


Olten-Lucerne 


20 30 


14 15 


9 25 


Baden 


Zurich-Zug 
Stein-Brufig 

Olten or Brugg . . 


22.15 
10.90 
13.20 


15.45 
7.90 
9.20 


10.05 
4.95 
6 00 


Basle 


Connection fare between SFR sta- 










tion and Bad. Station 


1.50 


1.05 


0.70 


Beatenberg . 
J$>\]{r)7,nnA 


Olten-Berne-Thun, then Trolley 
Olten-Berne-Scherzligen then boat. . 


27.85 
29.35 
52 65 


21.00 
22.40 
36 70 


15.55 
14.45 
23 95 






54.45 


37.95 


24.75 


Berne . 


Olten 


17 65 


12.30 


8 05 




Grenchen Nord or Olten 


19.50 


13.60 


8. 5 


Bienne 


Grenchen Nord . . . 


13.90 


9.70 


6.30 




Olten or Grenchen Nord 


14.85 


10.85 


6 75 






44 05 


30 70 


20 05 


ari^ue. 


Grenchen Nord or Olten 


45.70 


31 .85 


20.80 


Bnij?. 


Stein-Sackingen 


9.60 


6.70 


4 35 


Brunnen 




22 30 


15 55 


10 15 




Zurich-Zug 


24. 1C 


16.80 


10.95 


Buchs 


Stein-Zurich-Sargans. 


32.35 


22.55 


14 70 


Bulle 






21 75 


14 35 


Burgdorf 


Olten. 


13.90 


9.70 


6.30 


Chiasso 




63.55 


44.30 


28.90 


Chur 


Zurich-Zug 
Stein-Zurich-Sargans 


65.20 
34.00 


45.45 
23.70 


29.65 
15.45 


Colombier 


Grenchen-Nord-Bienne 
Olten-Bienne or Grenchen Nord. . . . 


20.00 
20.95 


13.95 
14.60 


9.10 
9.55 


Davos-Platz 


Brugg-Zurich-Landquart 


56.45 


38.60 


22.70 


Del6mont 




6.45 


4.50 


2.95 


Eneelbere 




25.45 


20.65 


13 05 


Faido 




42 75 


29 80 


19 4S 


Fluelen " " '. 


Zurich-Zug 


44.55 
24.25 


31.05 
16.90 


20.25 
11.05 






25 90 


18.05 


11 80 


Pribourg 


Olten-Berne 


22.80 


15.90 


10.35 




k Tower in Berne 



Phot. Wehrli 






- 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



87 



From 
BASLE 
to 


Via 


Swiss Francs 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Class 




jrenchen Nord or Olten-Berne .... 
Olten-Berne 


24.60 
28.25 
38.80 
39.80 
43.60 
26.10 
33.35 
35.15 
36.40 
37.20 
46.00 

31.05 
29.55 
31.20 
30.70 
32.70 
34.35 
47.15 
31.85 

31.05 
33.50 

35.50 
10.60 
48.85 
50.35 

52.80 
28.55 
56.30 
57.95 
59.25 
61.05 
22.80 
15.85 
29.50 
39.50 


17.15 
19.70 
27.05 
27.75 
30.40 
18.20 
23 . 25 
24.50 
27.35 
27.90 
31.45 
23.45 
24.70 
18.55 
19.80 
21.65 
20.60 
21.75 
21.40 
22.80 
23.95 
32.40 
22.20 
12.20 
21.65 
23.35 

24.75 
7.40 
34.05 
35.10 

36.80 
19.90 
39.25 
40.40 
41.30 
42.55 
15.90 
11.05 
18.05 
24.40 


11.20 
12.85 
17.65 
18.10 
19.80 
11.85 
15.15 
16.00 
17.50 
17.25 
19.00 
15.30 
16.10 
12.10 
12.90 
14.10 
13.45 
14.20 
13.35 
14.85 
15.60 
19.60 
14.50 
7.95 
14.10 
15.25 

16.15 
4.80 
22.20 
22.90 

24.00 
13.00 
25.60 
26.35 
26.95 
27.75 
10.05 
7.20 
11.20 
15.90 


Frutigen 




Grenchen Nord-Bienne 




jrenchen Nord-Bienne or Olten. . . . 
Berne or Bienne-Grenchen Nord 
Zurich 


M 


Glarus 
Goeschenen 


Olten-Lucerne 


Zurich-Zug 


Grindelwald 


Olten-Berne 




Lucerne-Brunig 


Gstaad 


Olten-Berne-Munsingen-Zweisimmen 
Coblenz 
Zurich or Koblenz 

Koblenz-Gossau 


Heiden 


Herisau 




Zurich or Koblenz-Gossau 
Zurich-Meilen-Wattwil 
Olten-Berne 


Herisau 

Interlaken 




Grenchen or Olten-Berne 


Kandersteg 
Klosters ...... 


31ten-Lucerne-Brunig 

Olten-Berne 


Grenchen Nord or Olten-Berne 


3rugg-Zurich-Landquart 






Burgdorf 


Lausanne 


Grenchen Nord-Bienne 




Olten-Berne or Bienne or Gr. N . . . . 
Grenchen Nord-Bienne or 
Olten-Berne 





Lenzburg 


Olten . . 


T-piik 


Olten-B erneKanderste tT 




Grenchen Nord-Bienne 


M 


Olten-Berne or Bienne or Grenchen 


Linthal 




Locarno. 


Olten-Lucerne. 




Zurich-Zucr 






Lungern 


Zurich-Zug 

Olten-Lucerne 


Olten 


Meiringen 


Olten-Lucerne 
Grenchen Nord-Bienne. . . 


Montr eux. . 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



from 
BASLE 


vu 


S* 


iss Fra 


C 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 

Class 


Third 

Clasa 


Montieux 


Grenchen Nord or Olten-Bienne. . . . 
Olten-Berne or Bienne or Grenchen 


36.00 


25.10 


16.35 




Nord 


37 45 


26 10 


17 05 


.. 


Berne-Zweisirnrnen . 


68 15 


47 go 


28 70 


Merges 




30 85 


21 50 


14 05 


Morges 


Olten or Grenrhen Nord-Bienne 


31 85 


22 20 


14 50 




Olten-Berne or Bienne or Grenchen 










Nord 


35 65 


24 85 


16 20 


Neuchatel 


Grenchen Nord-Bienne 


18 65 


13 00 


8 50 


Neuhausen 


Olten or Grenchen Nord-Bienne. . . 
Kobienz-Eghsau 


19 65 
16 50 


13.70 
11.50 


8.95 
7 50 


Olten 




6 60 


4 60 


3 00 


Palezieux 


Olten-Berne 


30 20 


21.05 


13 75 




Grenchen Nord-Bienne or Olten- 










Berne 


32 20 


22 45 


14 65 


Ragaz 




30 70 


21 40 


13 95 


Rappers wil 
Rheinfelden 


Zurich 


20.65 
2 80 


14.40 
1 95 


9.40 
1 30 


Romanshorn 


Koblenz 


26.60 


18.55 


12 10 




Zurich or Koblenz 


28 40 


19 80 


12 90 


Rorschach 




28 90 


20 15 


13 15 






30 70 


21 40 


13 95 


St. Gall .... 


Koblenz 


26 75 


18 65 


12 15 






28 55 


19 90 


13 00 


St. Imier 


Del6mont-Sonceboz 


14.85 


10.35 


6 75 


St. Margrethen 


Koblenz 


30 85 


21 50 


14 05 






3"> 70 


22 80 


14 85 


St. Maurice 


Grenchen Nord-Bienne 


39.45 


27.50 


17.95 




Olten-Berne or Bienne or Grenchen 










Nord 


41.95 


29.25 


19.05 


St. Moritz 


Brugg-Zurich-Chur 


75.10 


51.10 


29. 15 


Sargans 




29.70 


20.70 


13.50 


Sarnen 




19.15 


13.35 


8 70 


Schaffhausen . 


Koblenz-Eplisau 


17.00 


11.85 


7.75 






22.45 


15.65 


10 20 


Schinznach 




10.40 


7.25 


4.75 




Olten or Brugg 


10.90 


7.60 


4.95 


Schwyx 




21.65 


15.10 


9.85 


Sion ...".".".!!!".!". 


Zurich-Zug 
Grenchen Nord-Bienne 


23.45 
46.20 


16.35 
32.20 


10.65 
21.00 




Olten or Grenchen Nord-Bienne. . . 


47.20 


32.90 


21.45 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



89 



From 

HA OT p 




Sw 


issFra 


ncs 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Class 


Sion 


Olten-Berne or Bienne or Grenchen 










Nord. ... . . 


48 70 


33 95 


22.15 


M 


Olten-Berne-Kandersteg 


53 00 


36 95 


24 10 


Solothurn 


Olten 


12 25 


8 55 


5 55 




Del6mont-Gansbrunnen 




9 90 


6 45 


Spiez 


Olten-Berne 

Grenchen Nord or Olten-Berne 


25.45 
27 10 


17.75 
18 90 


11.55 
12.30 


Thalwil 


Zurich 


16 70 


11 65 


7 60 


Thun 


Olten-Berne 


22.60 


15.75 


10.30 




Grenchen or Olten-Berne 


24 45 


17 OS 


11 10 


Thusis 


Zurich 


44 50 


30 70 


18 95 


Vallorbe 


Grenchen Nord-Bienne 


32 20 


22.45 


14 65 




Olten or Grenchen N-Bienne- 










Neuchatel 


33.20 


23.15 


15.10 





Olten-Berne or Grenchen N-Bienne. 


41.25 


28 75 


18 75 


Vevey . 


Grenchen Nord-Bienne 


34 00 


23 70 


15 45 


1* 




34 50 


24 05 


15 70 




Olten or Grenchen N-Bienne 


35.00 


24.40 


15 90 





Berne or Bienne or Grenchen N- 










Lausanne 


36.50 


25.45 


16 60 


Visp. . . 


Olten-Berne-Kandersteg 


45 55 


31 75 


20 70 




Grenchen N-Bienne 


53 50 


37 30 


24 30 


M 












Lausanne 


55 95 


39 00 


25 45 


Wadenswil 


Zurich 


18 65 


13 00 


8 50 






27 55 


19 20 


12 55 


Weesen 


Zurich . ... 


24.60 


17 15 


11 20 


Weissenbur" . . 




31 45 


21 75 


13 90 


Winterthur 


Koblenz 


17.35 


12.10 


7 90 




Zurich or Koblenz 


19 15 


13 35 


8 70 


Yverdon 




24 75 


17 2=i 


11 25 




Olten or Grenchen N-Bienne 


25.60 


17.85 


1 1 65 


Zermatt 


Olten-Berne-Kandersteg .... 


70 35 


56 55 


35 20 


Zurich 


Stein-Brugg 
Olten or Stein 


14.70 
17.00 


10.25 
11 85 


6.70 

7 75 


ZS 


Altstetten 


19.50 
20 50 


13.60 
14 30 


8.85 
9 30 




Olten-Berne-Scherzligen . . , 


38.80 


26.50 


16.10 



90 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 




From 
BERNE 
to 


Via 


Swiss Franca 


First 
Class 


Sec. 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 


Olten . 


13.40 
37.65 
40.95 
24.75 
28.05 

20.50 
23.80 
17.85 
17.65 
19.50 
10.40 
11.70 
52.80 
56.10 
5.65 
26.40 
16.35 
22.45 
25.60 
39.10 

3.80 
63.55 
66.85 
40.75 
10.25 
63.05 
13.20 
25.45 
28.75 
42.90 
46.05 
24.25 
27.55 
5.30 
10.60 
26.10 
32.70 
33.50 
36.65 
18.75 


9.35 
26.25 
28.55 
17.25 
19.55 
27.40 
14.30 
16.60 
12.45 
12.30 
13.60 
8.85 
10.10 
36.80 
39.10 
3.95 
18.40 
11.40 
15.65 
17.85 
27.25 
9.40 
2.65 
44.30 
46.60 
28.40 
7.15 
43.20 
9.20 
20.65 
22.95 
29.90 
32.10 
16.90 
19.20 
3.70 
7.40 
18.20 
22.80 
23.35 
25.55 
15.05 


6.10 
17.10 
18.60 
11.25 
12.75 
17.85 
9.30 
10.80 
8.10 
8.05 
8.85 
7.60 
7.40 
24.- 
25.50 
2.55 
12. 
7.45 
10.20 
11.65 
17.80 
6.35 
1.75 
28.90 
30.40 
18.55 
4.65 
25.70 
6. 
13.05 
14.55 
19.50 
20.95 
11.05 
12.55 
2.40 
4.80 
11.85 
14.85 
15.25 
16.65 
9.45 


Airolo 


Langnau-Lucerne 




Aarburg-Luceme 


Altdorf 


Langnau-Lucerne 




Aarburg-Lucerne 


Appenzell 
Arth-Goldau 


Olten-Zurich-Gossau 


Langnau-Lucerne 


Aarburg-Lucerne 


Baden 


Olten 


Basle 


Olten 




Grenchen or Olten 


Beatenberg 


Thun, then Trolley 




Thun-Scherzligen, then boat 
Langnau-Lucerne . . 


Bellinzona 






Bienne 




Brigue 


Kandersteg 


Brugg 


Olten 


Brunnen 


Langnau-Lucerne 






Buchs 


Olten-Zurich or Lucerne-Thalwil . . . 
Romont . 


Bulle 


Burgdorf 




Chiasso 


Langnau-Lucerne 


Chur 




Olten-Zurich or Lucerne-Thalwil . . . 
Kerzers-Neuchatel 


Colombier 


Davos-Platz 


Olten-Zurich or Lucerne Thalwil . . . 


Del6mont 


Engelberg. . . 


Langnau-Lucerne 






Faido 






Aarburg-Lucerne 


Fluelen 






Fribourg 




Frutigen 




Geneva 




Glarus 


Lucerne or Zurich Thalwil 








Aarburg-Lucerne 


Grindelwald... 


Miinsimren or Belo . . 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



91 



From 

RFRNP 


Vim 


Sw 


iss Frai 


1CS 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Gstaad . . . 


Zweisimmen 


28 35 


19 15 


11 


Heiden 


Olten-Zurich 




29 40 


19 20 


Herisau . 


Olten-Zurich-Gossau 




24 50 


16 - 




Zurich- Meilen- Wattwil 


37 95 


26 45 


17 25 





Lucerne-Thalwil-Wattwil 


39 10 


27 25 


17 80 


Interlaketi 


Munsingen or Belp 


11 90 


8 30 


5 40 


Kandersteg 


Munsingen or Belp 


15 05 


10 50 


6 85 


Klosters 


Zurich-Thalwil-Landquart 


53 75 


37 


22 60 




Zurich-Thalwil. . . ."* 


38 45 


26 80 


17 50 






6 45 


4 50 


2 95 


Lausanne 


Pribourg 


16 20 


11 30 


7 35 




Olten 


15 20 


10 60 


6 90 


Leuk 


Kandersteg 


31 20 


21 75 


14 20 




Che xbres- village 


33 50 


23 35 


15 25 







35 50 


24 75 


16 15 


Linthal 


Thalwil 


35 35 


24 65 


16 05 


Locarno 


Langnau- Lucerne .... 


56 30 


39 25 


25 60 






59 60 


41 55 


27 10 


Lugano 


Langnau- Lucerne 


59 40 


41 40 


27.00 




Aarburg-Lucerne 


62 55 


43 60 


28 45 


Lungern 


Thun- 1 nterlaken 


20 15 


14 05 


8 85 




Langnau-Lucerne 


22 80 


15 90 


10 15 


Lucerne 


Langnau 


15 85 


11 05 


7 20 






19 15 


13 35 


8 70 





InterlakeQ-Brunig 


27.25 


19 


11.70 


Meiringen 


Interlaken 


17 


11 85 


7 75 






18 15 


12 65 


8 25 




Lausanne 


20.15 
50 70 


14.05 
35 30 


9.15 
20 70 


Merges 




18.15 


12.65 


8.25 


Neuchatel 


Kerzers 


8.95 


6 25 


4 05 


Neuhausen 


Olten-Zurich-Rglisau 


28 90 


20 15 


13 15 


Olten 




11 05 


7 70 


5 05 


Pal6zieux 




12.70 


8 85 


5 80 


Ragaz 


Thalwil 


37 45 


26 10 


17 05 


Rapperswil 
Rheinfelden . . 


Olten-Zurich 
Olten Pratt 


27.40 
17.65 


19.10 
12 30 


12.45 
8 05 




Olten-Zurich 


35 15 


25 50 


16 




Olten-Zurich 


37 45 


26 10 


17 05 


St G alien 


Olten-Zurich 


35 35 


24 65 


16 05 


St. Imier 


Bienne 


10.40 


7 25 


4 75 


St. Marerethen. . 


Olten-Zurich. . . 


39.45 


27.50 


17.95 



92 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
BERNE 
to 


Via 


Swiss Francs 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 

Class 


Third 
Class 


St Maurice 


Che xbres- village 


22.60 
24.60 
81.85 
36.50 
19.15 
23.80 
29.20 
30.85 
15.55 
21.80 
25.10 
29.40 
31.35 
35.35 

7.75 
23.45 
5.15 
51.25 

23780 
19.15 
17. 
49.95 
27.90 
25.45 
34.35 
31.20 
13.80 
25.90 

15.05 
52.70 
21.45 
25.45 
20.65 
26.25 
21.15 


15.75 
17.15 
55.80 
25.45 
13.35 
16.60 
20.35 
21.50 
10.85 
15.20 
17.50 
20.50 
21.85 
24.65 
4.60 
5.10 
5.40 
16.35 
3.60 
35.40 
14.60 
16.60 
13.35 
11.85 
35.55 
19.45 
17.75 
23.95 
21.75 
9.45 
18.05 
9.45 
10.50 
44.25 
14.95 
17.75 
14.40 
18.30 
14.20 


10.30 
11.20 
32.25 
16.60 
8.70 
10.80 
13.30 
14. 
7.05 
9.90 
11.40 
13.35 
14.25 
16.05 
3. 
3.30 
3.55 
10.65 
2.35 
22.05 
9.55 
10.80 
8.70 
7.75 
20.85 
12.70 
11.55 
15.60 
14.20 
5.85 
11.80 
6.15 
6.85 
27.20 
9.75 
11.55 
9.40 
11.95 
8.05 




Lausanne 


St. Moritz 


Thalwil 
Thalwil 


Sarnen ..... 


Langnau-Lucerne 


Schaffhausen 


Interlaken-Brunig 


Olten-Zurich-Eglisau 


SchafFhausen 


Olten-Zurich- Winterthur . 




Olten 


Schwyz 


Langnau-Lucerne 






Sion 


Chexbres- village 




Lausanne 




Solothurn 


Fraubrunnen 


Spiez 


Burgdorf 




Thalwil 


Zurich or Lucerne 


Thun 




Thusis 


Thalwil 


Vallorbe 


Fribourg-Payerne 


Vevey 




Lausanne or Chexbres 


Chexbres . . . 


M 




Visp 


Kandersteg. 


Wadenswil 
Wallenstadt 
Weesen 


Thalwil 


Thalwil 


Thalwil . . . 






Winterthur 
Yverdon .... 


Olten-Zurich 
Fribourg-Payerne 




Neuchatel 


Zermatt 




Zurich 


Olten 






Zue 




.*? 
Zweisimmen 


Olten-Zurich 
Spiez 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



93 



From 

f*TTW AGCZO 


VI* 


Sw 


iaa Frai 


ic 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 


Lucerne-Olten 


59.10 


41.20 


26.85 


Aigle 


Langnau-B erne-Lausanne 


86.15 


60.05 


39 15 




Lucerne or Aarburg-Berne or 










O Iten-B ienne-Lausanne 


90 25 


62 90 


41 05 


Airolo 


Bellinzona 


26.10 


18.20 


11.85 


Altdorf 


Bellinzona 


38 95 


27.15 


17 70 


Appenzell 


Zug-Zurich-Winterthur-Gossau 




47.75 


31.15 




Zu^-Wattwil 




48.20 


31.45 


Arth-Goldau 




43 25 


30 15 


19 65 


Baden. . 


Zu<T-Altstetten 


54.30 


37.85 


23.70 


Basle 


Lucerne-Olten 


63.55 


44.30 


28.90 


Beatenberg 


Lucerne-Interlaken then Trolley. . . . 


67.85 


48.70 


32.80 




Lucerne-Interlaken, then boat 


69.15 


50. 


32.85 


Bellinzona 




10.90 


7.60 


4.95 


Berne 




63 55 


44 30 


28 90 


Bienne 


Lucerne-Olten 


66.70 


46.50 


30.30 


Brugg (Aargau) . 


Rothkreuz-Othmarsingen . 


53.50 


37.30 


24.30 


Bmnnen 




41 25 


28 75 


18.75 


Buchs (St. Gall) . 


Thalwil 


64.35 


44.85 


29.25 


Burgdorf . . 


Lucerne-Aarburg 


63.05 


43.95 


28 65 


Chur 


Thalwil 


66 00 


46 00 


30 00 


Colombier 


Lucerne-Olten-Bienne 


72.80 


50.75 


33.10 




Lucerne-Berne-Neuchatel 


73.75 


51.40 


33 55 


Davos-Platz 


Thalwil 


88 30 


60 80 


37 15 


Delemont 


Lucerne-Olten-Basle 


69.80 


48.65 


31.75 


Enselbere 


Lucerne-lake 


57.45 


42.95 


27.60 


Faido 




20 80 


14 50 


9 45 


Fluelen 


Bellinzona . 


39.30 


27.40 


17.85 


Fribourg . 


Lucerne- Langnau-B erne 


68.80 


47.95 


31 30 






70 00 


48 80 


31 20 


Geneva 


Lucerne-Langnau-Berne 


89.60 


62.45 


40.75 




Lucerne- Aarburg-Berne or Bienne . . 


92.75 


64.45 


4? 15 


Glarus 


Thalwil 


57.95 


40.40 


26.35 


Goeschenen 




30.20 


21.05 


13.75 


Grindelwald 


Lucerne-Bruni or 


69.20 


50.20 


31 80 


Herisau 
Interlaken 


Zug-Thalwil-Uznach 
Lucerne-Brunig 


64.35 
62.70 


44.85 
43.70 


29 . 25 
27.90 


Kandersteg 


Lucerne-Brunig . 


74.45 


51 90 


33 25 


Klosters 


Thalwil 


79 00 


54 60 


34 05 


Landquart 


Thalwil 


63.70 


44.40 


28.95 


Langnau 


Lucerne . . 


57 25 


39 90 


26 05 


Lausanne 


Lucerne-Lananau-Berne. . . 


79.55 


55.45 


36.15 



94 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Prom 
CHIAASO 


Via 


S* 


i88 Frai 


1C8 


to 




First 

Class 


Aec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Class 


Lausanne 


Lucerne- Aarburg or Langnau- Berne. 
Lucerne- Aarburg- Berne or Bienne. 


82.85 
83 65 


57.75 
58.30 


37.65 
38 05 


Lenzburg . . 


Rothkreuz 


52 15 


36 35 


23 70 


Leuk 


Lucerne- Konolfingpn-Kandersteg 




61 90 


40 35 




Lucerne-Briinig 


90.95 


63.40 


40 75 


< 


Lucerne- Langnau- B erne-Lau sanne 


99 00 


69 00 


45 00 


Linthal 


Thalwil 


60 55 


42 20 


27 55 


Locarno 




13.40 


9.35 


6 10 


Lugano 




4 30 


3 00 


1 95 


Lungern 


Lucerne 


54.80 


38.20 


24.70 


Lucerne 


Bellinzonal-Fuelen 


47 85 


33 35 


21 75 






57 95 


40 40 


25 75 


Montreux 


Lucerne-Langnau-Berne 


83.65 


58.30 


38.05 




Lucerne- Aarburg-B erne 


86 95 


60 60 


39.55 


< 




87 80 


61 20 


39 90 


Morges 


Lucerne-Langnau-Berne 


81.70 


56.95 


37.15 


Neuchatel 


Lucerne-Olten-Bienne . . 


71 .45 


49 80 


32 50 






58 10 


40 50 


26 40 




Zug-Zurich-Winterthur 


59.60 


41.55 


27.10 


Olten. . ... 


Lucerne . . . 


56.95 


39.70 


25.90 


Palezieux 




76 25 


50 15 


34 65 


Ragaz 


Thalwil 


62.70 


43.70 


28.50 


Rapperswil 


Thalwil- Pfaffikon ... . 


53.80 


37.50 


24 45 




Thalwil-Zurich-Meilen 


56 60 


39 45 


25 75 


Rheinfelden .... 


Zug-Altstetten-Brugg 


62.40 


43.50 


28.35 




Lucerne-Olten-Pratteln . . .... 


63 . 55 


44.30 


28 90 


Romanshorn 




64 35 


44 85 


29 25 


Rorschach . . 


Zug-Zurich-Winterthur 


66.70 


46.50 


30.30 


St. Gall 


Zug-Zurich-Winterthur 


64.55 


45.00 


29.35 






71.45 


49 80 


32 50 


Sargans 


Thalwil 


61.75 


43 . 05 


28.05 


Sarnen 




51.15 


35.65 


23.25 






58.45 


40 . '/5 


26.55" 




Zup p -Zurirh-Winterthur 


60.60 


41.90 


27.30 


Schinznach 


Rothkreuz 


53.95 


37.60 


24.55 


Schwyz 




41.95 


29.25 


19.05 


Sion . 


Lucerne-Langnau-Berne 


94.90 


66.15 


43.15 






95.05 


66.25 


42.60 


Solothurn 




62.55 


43.60 


28.45 


Sniez 


Lucerne-Brunig 


67.35 


46.95 


30.00 


Thalwil 




48.70 


33.95 


22.15 


Thusis. . . 


Thalwil.. 


76.50 


53.00 


33.50 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



95 



Prom 
CHIASSO 
to 


Via 


Swis Francs 


First 

Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Vallorbe 


Lucerne-Olten-Bienne . 


85.00 
86. 
80.35 

87.65 
50.65 
59.60 
56. 6C 
73.35 

77.40 
78.55 
50.65 
45.90 
80.70 


59.25 
59.95 
56.00 
59.60 
61.10 
35.30 
41.55 
39.45 
50.95 
53.70 
53.95 
54.75 
35.30 
32.00 
55.70 


38.65 
29.10 
36.55 
38.85 
39.25 
23.05 
27.10 
25.75 
32.30 
35.05 
35.20 
35.70 
23.05 
20.85 
34.50 




Lucerne-Langnau-B erne 


Vevey 


Lucerne-Langnau-Berne. ... ... 


V.SD 


Lucerne-Konolfingen-Kandersteg . . . 
Lucerne-Brunig-Kandersteg 
Thalwil 


v .sp 


Wadenswil 
Wallenstadt 


Thalwil 


Weesen 


Thalwil 


Weissenburg 


Lucerne-Brunig-Spiez 

Lucerne-Langnau-Berne-Fribourg. . . 


Yverdon 




M 


Lucerne-Berne-Neuchate 1 


Zurich 


Zug-Thalwil 


Zug. . 


Fluelen 


Zwpisimrnen 


Lucerne-Brunig-Interlaken. . . 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 

fVWFVA 




Sw 


issFrai 


ics 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Clss 


Aarau 


Bienne 


37 


25 80 


16 80 




Berne 


39.30 


27.40 


17.85 


Aigle 


Lausanne. . 


16.50 


11.50 


7 50 


Altdorf 


Berne-Langnau-Lucerne 


50.85 


35.45 


23.10 


Appenzell 


Bienne-Zurich-Gossau 
Berne-Zurich-Gossau. 




43.95 

45 55 


28.65 
29.70 


Arth-Goldau. 




46 40 


32 3 S 


21 10 


Baden 


Bienne 


41.45 


28.90 


18.85 




Berne 


43 75 


30 50 


19.90 


Basle 




38 80 


27 05 


17 65 




Bienne-Olten ... 


39.80 


27.75 


18.10 


4 


Berne-Olten. 


43 60 


30 40 


19 80 






78 70 


54 85 


35 80 




Berne or Bienne-Aarburg-Lucerne . 


82. 


57.15 


37.30 


Berne. 


Lausanne 


26 10 


18 20 


11 85 


Bex 


Lausanne 


17.85 


12.45 


8.10 


Bienne 


Lausanne 


24 95 


17.40 


11.35 


Brig 


Lausanne 


34 


23 70 


15 45 




Bienne-Olten 


39.95 


27.85 


18.15 


.7 & 


Berne-Olten 


42.25 


29 45 


19 20 


Brunnen 


Berne-Langnau-Lucerne 


48.35 


33.70 


22. 






51 65 


36 


23 50 


Buchs 


B ienne-Zurich. 


62.90 


43.85 


28 60 






65 05 


45 35 


29 55 


Bulle 


Romont 




14.50 


9.65 


Burgdorf 


Berne 


29.90 


20 . 85 


13 60 


Chateau-d'Oex.... 


Lausanne-Montreux 


30.85 


22.25 


13.85 


Chiasso 




89 60 


62 4S 


40 75 




Bienne-Aarburg-Lucerne. 


92.75 


64.65 


42.15 


Chur. . 




64 55 


45. 


29 35 




Berne-Zurich or Langnau-Lucerne . . 


66.70 


46.50 


30.30 


Colombier 


Lausanne. 


19. 


13.25 


8.65 


Davos Platz 




86 80 


59.75 


36 50 






89 15 


61 40 


37 55 


Delemont 


Grenchen-Nord. 


32.50 


22.65 


14.80 


Engelberg. 




51.35 


38.70 


24 85 






54 65 


41 


26 35 


Faido 




68 80 


47 95 


31 30 


Fluelen 


B erne-Langnau-Lucerne 


50 35 


35.10 


22.90 


Frauenf eld . ... 




52 15 


36 35 


23 70 




Berne-Zurich 


54.45 


37.95 


24.75 


Fribourg. . , 


Lausanne. 


20.95 


14.60 


9.55 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



97 



From 

f^PTWVA 


VI 


S 


ias Frai 


ica 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 




B erne-Thun 


36 35 


25 55 


16 65 




Lausanne-Brigue . . . 


50.20 


35 


22 80 





M ontreu x-Z weisimmen-Spiez . 


59 80 


41 65 


24 85 


Glarus 


Bienne-Zurich 


56.45 


39.35 


25.65 




Berne-Lucerne or Zurich. 


58.60 


40 85 


26 65 


Goeschenen. 


B erne-Langnau- Lucerne 


59 40 


41 40 


27 


Grindelwald 


Berne-Thun-Interlaken 


44.80 


33.20 


21 30 




Montreu x-Z weisimmen-Spiez . 


68 10 


49 40 


29 55 


Gstaad 




36 35 


26 


16 10 


Heiden 


Bienne-Zurich-Rorschach 




46 


30 




B erne-Zurich-Rorschach 




47 60 


31 05 


Herisau 


Bienne-Zurich-Gossau 


_ 


41.05 


26 80 




Berne-Zurich-Gossau. . . . 




42 70 


27 85 


Interlaken. 


B erne-Thun . 


37 95 


26 45 


17 25 






56 95 


39 70 


25 90 


44 . ' 


Montreux-Zweisimmen 


61 10 


42 55 


25 4S 


Kandersteg 


Lausanne-B erne 


41 10 


28 65 


18 70 




Lausanne-Brig 


45.70 


31.85 


20 80 


Klosters. . . 


Bienne-Zurich 


77.50 


53 55 


33 40 




Berne-Zurich or Lucerne. 


79 85 


55 ?0 


34 45 


Landquart 


Bienne-Zurich 


62.20 


43.35 


28 30 




Berne-Zurich or Lucerne. 


64 55 


45 


29 3S 


Langnau 


Berne 


32 35 


22 55 


14 70 


Lausanne 




10.10 


7.05 


4 60 


Lenzberg. . . 


Bienne 


38 80 


27 05 


17 65 




Berne 


41 10 


28 65 


18 70 


Leuk 


Lausanne 


29.40 


20.50 


13 35 


Linthal . . 


B ienne-Zurich. 


59 10 


41 20 


26 95 






61 25 


42 70 


27 85 


Locarno 


Berne-Langnau-Lucerne 


82.20 


57.30 


37 35 




Bienne- Aarburg-Lucerne. . 


85.50 


59 60 


38 85 


Lugano . 




85 30 


59 45 


38 80 




Bienne- Aarburg-Lucerne 


88.60 


61.75 


40 30 


Lungern 


B erne-B rienz . 


46.20 


32 20 


20 70 


Lucerne. 




41 75 


29 10 


19 




Montreux-Zweisimmen-Interlaken . . 


76.60 


53 35 


31 80 


Meiringen 


B erne-B rienz. 


43.10 


30 05 


19 60 


Montreux 


Montreux-Zweisimmen-Interlaken . . 
Lausanne 


66.35 
14.05 


46.20 
9.80 


27.80 
6 40 


Merges 




7 95 


5 55 


3 60 


Neuchatel 




20 15 


14 05 


9 15 


Neuhausen. . , 




52.50 


36.60 


23.85 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Prom 
GENEVA 


Via 


S* 


issFra 


tics 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Class 


Neuhausen 


Berne-Zurich.- Eglisau 


54 80 


38 20 


24 90 


Olten . ... 


Bienne 


34 85 


24 30 


15 85 




Berne. 


37 15 


25 90 


16 90 


Palezieux 
Ragaz 


Lausanne 
Bienne-Zurich 


13.40 
61.25 
63 40 


9.35 
42.70 
44 20 


6.10 

27.85 
28 80 


Rapperswil 


Bienne-Zurich. 


51 15 


35 65 


23 25 






53 30 


37 15 


24 25 


Rheinfelden 




4^ 60 


30 40 


19 80 


Romanshorn. . . . 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich 


61 05 


42 55 


27 75 


Rorschach. 




63 55 


44 30 


28 90 


St. Gall 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich. 


61 40 


42.80 


27.90 


St. Imier. . . 


Neuchatel-Chaux de Fonds 


29 20 


20 35 


13.30 






29 70 


20 70 


13 50 


St. Margrethen . . 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich. . . . 


65.50 


45.65 


29.80 


St. Maurice. 




18 50 


12 90 


8.40 


St. Moritz 
Sargens 


Berne or Biel Zurich or Lucerne. . . . 
Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne 


107.80 
62.40 


73.90 
43.50 


44. 
28 35 


Sarnen 




45 05 


31 40 


20.50 














Spiez. . 


73.15 


50.95 


30.30 


Schaffhausen . 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich-Eglisau 


55.30 


38.55 


25.15 




Winterthur 


56.60 


39.45 


25.75 


Schinznach 


Berne or Bienne-Olten 


41 45 


28.90 


18.85 


Scliwyz ... . 




47 70 


33.25 


21.70 






51 


35 55 


23 20 


Sierre 




27.90 


19.45 


12.70 


Sion 




25 25 


17.60 


11.50 




Bienne 


29.05 


20.25 


13.20 


Spiez 




33.85 


23.60 


15.40 






57. 


39 70 


23.55 


M 




53 


36 95 


24.10 


Thalwil... 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne . 


49.20 


34.30 


22.35 


Thun 




31 .20 


21.75 


14.20 






59 75 


41 .60 


24.80 


Thusis. . . 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne 


77.20 


53.50 


33.80 


Vallorbe 




15.55 


10 85 


7.05 


Vevey 




13.05 


9.10 


5.95 


Visp 




32.50 


22.65 


14.80 


Waedenswil 




51.35 


35.80 


23.35 


WaJlenstadt... 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich 


60.25 


42. 


27.40 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



99 



From 

PFNFVA 


Vi* 


Sw 


issFrai 


1C3 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Clasa 


Weesen . . 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich. 


54 95 


38 30 


25 




Berne-Spiez 


39 85 


27 60 


17 7O 




Montreux-Zweisimmen 


51 40 


35 95 


21 40 


Winterthur 


B ienne-Zurich 


49 50 


34 50 


22 50 




Berne-Zuricli 


51.85 


36 15 


23.55 


Yverdon 


Lausanne. 


14 20 


9 90 


6 45 


Zerraatt 


Lausanne- Visp 


57 30 


47.45 


29 30 


Zurich . . 




47 35 


33 


21 .55 


Zug 




46 40 


32 35 


21 10 




Berne or Bienne-Zurich 


52 30 


36.45 


23.80 




Lausanne-Montreux . . 


43.60 


30.90 


19.05 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLA: 



From 
INTERLAKEN 


Via 


Sw 


issFrai 


tea 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


A&rau 


Berne-Olten. 


25 25 


17 60 


11 50 


Aigle 


Berne 


34.50 


24 05 


15 70 




Spiez-Kandersteg 


40 60 


28 30 


18 45 





Zweisimmen-Montreux 


49.55 


34.50 


20.20 


Airolo . . . 


Brunig-Lucerne ... 


36.65 


25.55 


16 05 




Thun-Konolnngen-Lucerne 




30.40 


19.80 


Altdorf 


Brunig-Lucerne 


23.95 


16.70 


10 30 


Arth-Goldau. . . 


Brunig-Lucerne . 


19.50 


13 60 


8 25 


Baden 


B runig-Lucerne-ZuricH 


28 25 


19 70 


12 25 




Berne-Olten 


29.70 


20.70 


13 50 


Basle 


Berne-Olten. 


29.55 


20 60 


13 45 




Brunig-Olten. 


30 70 


21 40 


13 35 


< 


Berne-Bienne-Grenchen 


31.20 


21.75 


14 20 




By boat 






4 70 




By trolley 





__ 


4.65 


Bellinzona. 


Brunig-Lucerne 


51.85 


36.15 


22 95 






11 90 


8 30 


5 40 


Bex 


Berne-Lausanne 


35.80 


24.95 


16.30 




Spiez-Kandcrste cr 


39.10 


27.25 


18 40 


< 


Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux 


51.05 


35.55, 


20.85 


Bienne. . ... 


Berne 


17.50 


12.20 


7.95 


Brig 


Spiez-Kandersteg . 


?2.95 


16. 


10 45 






25.45 


17.75 


10 95 




Berne-Olten 


28.25 


19.70 


12.85 


Brunnen 


Brunig-Lucerne. 


21.45 


14.95 


9 15 




Thun-Konolfingen-Lucerne 




19.80 


12.90 


Buchs 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwii 


38.15 


26.60 


16.75 




Berne-Olten-Zurich 


51. 


35.55 


23.20 


Burgdorf 


Steffisburg 




9.55 


6.25 




Berne 


15.70 


10.95 


7.15 


Chateau-d'Oex 




30.25 


20 35 


11 65 


Chiasso. . 


Brunig-Lucerne 


62.70 


43.70 


27.90 


Chur 


Briinig-Lucerne-Thalwil 


39.80 


27.75 


17.50 






52.65 


36.70 


23 95 


Colombier 


Berne-Neuchatel 


22.15 


15.45 


10.05 


Davos-Platz 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 


62.25 


42.65 


24.70 


DeleTnont 




24 95 


17.40 


11.35 


EnejelberR 


Brunig-Alpnachstad 


21.55 


17.65 


10.50 


Faido 




41.95 


29.25 


18.45 






23.45 


16.35 


10.05 


Frauenfeld 


Brunig-Lucerne-Zurich 


31.55 


22. 


13.75 




Berne-Olten-Zurich 


40.45 


28.20 


18.40 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



101 



From 
INTERLAKEN 
to 


Via 


Swiss Franc* 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 

Class 


Third 
Class 




Berne 


17.20 
6.80 
37.95 
56.95 
61.10 
31.85 
44.75 
32.50 

24.70 
11.25 
52.95 
37.65 
50.50 

28.05 
27.75 
34.35 
55.45 
58.45 
15.05 
4.80 
32.05 
47.05 
43.10 
30.05 
53.35 
49.20 
20.80 
31.85 
22.95 
24.10 
24.60 
36.50 
49.35 
27.55 
30.70 
40.45 
38.30 
47.20 
42.40 
51.35 


12. 
4.75 
26.45 
39.70 
42.55 
22.20 
31.20 
22.65 
6.50 
16.60 
7.85 
36.45 
26.25 
35.20 
8.55 
19.55 
19.35 
23.95 
38.65 
40.75 
10.50 
3.35 
22.35 
32.75 
30.05 
20.95 
37.15 
34.30 
14.50 
22.20 
16. 
16.80 
17.15 
25.45 
34.40 
19.20 
21.40 
28.20 
26.70 
32.90 
29.55 
35.80 


7.80 
3.10 
17.25 
25.90 
25.45 
13.80 
20.35 
14.20 
3.90 
9.35 
5.10 
21.60 
16.50 
22.95 
5.55 
12.75 
12.60 
15. 
24.55 
25.95 
6.15 
2.20 
14.55 
19.05 
19.60 
13.65 
21.90 
22.35 
9.45 
13.90 
10.45 
10.35 
11.20 
16. 
22.45 
11.95 
13.35 
17.80 
16.80 
21.45 
18.70 
23.35 


Frutigen 


Spiez 


Geneva . 


Berne 









Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux 
Brunig-Thalwil ... 


Glarus 




Berne-Olt en-Zurich 


Goeschenen 
Grind el wald 


Briinig-Lucerne 




Gstaad 




Kandersteg 


Spiez.. . ... 


Klosters 
Landquart 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 




Berne-Olten-Zurich . . 


Langnau 
Lausanne 


Thun-Konolfingen 


Berne 


Leuk 


Spiez-Kandersteg 


Linthal 
Locarno 


Brunig-Lucerne 


Lugano 


Briinig-Lucerne . . . 




Meiringen 
Montreux . 


Brienz 


Berne 




Spiez-Zweisimmen 


Spiez- Kandersteg 
Berne 


Morges 




Spiez-Zweisimmen- Montreux 


Spiez-Kandersteg 
B erne-Kerzers. 


Neuchatel . . 


Neuhausen 




Olten 


BeiW 




Brunig-Lucerne 


PaI6zieux 




Ragaz . . 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 
Berne-Olten-Zurich 


4. 


Rapperswil 
Rheinfelden 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 


Brunig-Lucerne-Olten 


Rorschach 




St. Gallen 


Brunig- Lucerne-Zurich 


Berne-Olten-Zurich 


St. Margrethen. . . 


Brunig-Lucerne-Zurich 


Berne-Olten-Zurich . . 



302 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
INTERLAKEN 
to 


via 


Swiss Francs 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


St. Maurice 


Berne-Lausanne . . . 


36.50 
38.65 
51.70 
80.90 
35.50 
48.35 
11.55 
32.20 
41.10 
20.80 
29.20 
31.85 

4.15 
22.45 
35.35 
6.95 
50.30 
34.35 
35.50 
28.75 
44.05 
48.20 
24.45 
24.45 
37.30 
33.35 
46.20 
30.40 
10.15 
28.90 
26.90 
49.25 
24.45 
33.35 
19.65 
17.50 


25.45 
26.95 
36. 
55.15 
24.75 
33.70 
8.05 
22.45 
28.65 
14.50 
20.35 
22.20 
15. 
12.90 
2.90 
15.65 
24.65 
4.85 
34.75 
23.95 
24.75 
20.05 
30.70 
33.55 
17.05 
17.05 
26. 
23.25 
32.20 
21.20 
6.10 
20.15 
18.75 
41.85 
17.05 
23.25 
13.70 
11.65 


16.60 
17.55 
21.15 
31.20 
15.55 
22. 
4.65 
14.05 
18.70 
8.85 
13.30 
14.50 
7.80 
8.40 
1.90 
9.60 
16.05 
3.15 
21. 
15.60 
16.15 
13.05 
20.05 
19.60 
11.10 
10.50 
16.95 
14.55 
21. 
13.20 
4.20 
12.55 
12.25 
25.65 
10.50 
15.15 
8.35 
6.40 







Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux. . . . 


St. Moritz. 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 




B runig-Thalwil 




Berne-Olten-Zurich ... . . 


Sarnen 




Schaff hausen 


Brunig-Lucerne-Zurich-Eglisau 
Berne-Olten-Zurich-Eglisau . 








Sierre 


Spiez-Kandersteg 


Sion 


Spiez-Kandersteg 


Solothurn 


Thun-Steffisburg 




Berne-Fraubrunnen . . 


Spiez 




Thalwil 


Brunip-Lucerne 




Berne-Olten-Zurich . . . 


Thun 




Thusis . . 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 
Berne-Neuchatel 


Vallorbe 




Berne-Lausanne 


Vevey 


Berne-Chexbres 




Spiez-Kandersteg-Brigue 
Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux 
Spiez-Kandersteg 

B runig-Lucern e-Thalwil 





Visp 


Waedenswil 




Berne-Olten-Zurich 


Wallenstadt 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 




Berne-Olten-Zurich 


Weesen . . . . 


Brunig-Lucerne-Thalwil 


Weissenburg 
Winterthur 
Yverdon. . 


Spiez. 


Berne-Neuch&tel 


Zermatt. 










Berne-Olten. 


Zug 




Zweisimrnen 


Spiez 



Grindelwald the Upper Glacier Bernese Oberland 

Phot. Nikles 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



103 



From 
A TTQ A Trvp 




Sw 


issFrai 


1CS 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 


Berne or Bienne 


29 20 


20 35 


13 50 


Aigle 




6.60 


4 60 


3. 


Airolo 


Berne-Langnau-Lucene 


53 65 


37 40 


24 40 




Bienne-Aarburg-Lucerne 


57.75 


40.25 


26.25 


Altdorf 


B erne-Langnau-Lucerne 


40 75 


28 40 


18 55 


Appenzell 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich-Gossau 




38 45 


25 05 


Arth-Goldau 




36 50 


25 45 


16 60 




Berne or Bienne-Olten 


33 50 


23 35 


15 25 


Basle 




31 05 


21 65 


14 10 






31 85 


22 20 


14 50 


< 


Berne-Olten. 


33 50 


23 35 


15 25 


Beatenberg ... 




26 40 


20 


14 85 




Berne-Thun-Scherzligen, then boat 


27.85 


21 35 


14.75 


Bellinzona. 


B erne- Aarburg- Lucerne 


72 95 


50 85 


33 15 


Berne. 




16 20 


11 30 


7 35 


Bienne 


Neuchatel 


17. 2C 


12. 


7 80 




Berne-Lyss 


21 65 


15 10 


9 85 


Brigue 




24.10 


16.80 


10 95 




Berne or Bienne-Olten . . . 


32.20 


22.45 


14 65 


Brunnen ... 




38 45 


26 80 


17 50 






4? 60 


29 70 


19 35 


Buchs. . 


Berne- Lucerne or Zurich 


55.15 


38 45 


25 05 


Bulle 






7 60 


5 15 






19.80 


13.80 


9. 


Chateau-d'Oex. . . . 


Montreux . . . .... 


20.95 


15 35 


9 35 


Chiasso .... 




79.55 


55 45 


36 15 






83 65 


58 30 


38 05 


Chur 


Berne-Zurich or Lucerne 


56.80 


39.60 


25.80 


Colornbier 




11 .05 


7 70 


5 05 


Davos-Platz 




79 05 


54 35 


3? 95 


Delemcnt 


Bienne-Grenchen . 


24.75 


17.25 


11 25 


Eneelberg . . 




41.45 


31 80 


20 35 


Faido. 




58 90 


41 05 


26 80 




Bienne-Aarburg-Lucerne 


63.05 


43.95 


28 65 


Fluelen 


Berne-Lanpmau-Lucerne 


40.30 
44 40 


28.10 
30 95 


18.30 
20 20 


Frauenf eld 


Berne or Bienne-Olten-Zurich 


44.40 


30.95 


20 20 


Fribourg. . . . 




10.90 


7 60 


4 95 


Frutigen 




26.75 


18.65 


12.15 




Brigue-Kandersteg. 


40.30 


28 10 


18 30 


Geneva 




10 10 


7 05 


4 60 


Claras. .. 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich.. . 


48.70 


33.95 


22.15 



104 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
LAUSANNE 


Via 


Sw 


issFrar 


10 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 

Class 


Third 

Class 


Goeschenen. . 


Berne-Langnau-Lucerne 


49 50 


34 50 


22 50 




Bienne-Aarburg-Lucerne 


53.65 


37.40 


24.40 


Grindelwald . 


Berne-Thun. 


34 90 


26.30 


16 80 




Montreux-Zweisimtnen 


58.20 


42.50 


25.05 


Gstaad.. . 


Montreux 


26.45 


19.10 


11.60 


Heiden. 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich-Rorschach. 




40.45 


26 40 


Herisau 






35 55 


23 20 


Interlaken 


Berne 


28.05 


19.55 


12.75 




B rigue- Kand ersteg . 


47 05 


32 80 


21 40 







51 20 


35 65 


20 95 


Kandersteg 


Berne-Thun. 


31.20 


21.75 


14 20 




Brigue 


35.80 


24.95 


16 30 





Montreux-Zweisimmen-Spiez 


54.35 


37.85 


22.35 


Klosters 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich. . 


69.75 


48.15 


29 85 


Landquart 




54.45 


37 95 


24 75 


Langnau 


Berne 


22.45 


15.65 


10.20 


Leuk 




19.50 


13.60 


8 85 


Locarno. 




72 30 


50 40 


32 85 




Bienne-Aarbtirg- Lucerne 


76.40 


53.25 


34.75 


Lugano 


B erne-Langnau-Luceme 


75.40 


52.55 


34 30 






79 55 


55 45 


36 15 


Lungern 


Berne-Langnau-Lucerne 


38.80 


27.05 


17.40 




Beme-Interlaken-Brienz 


36.30 


25.30 


16 20 


Lucerne 




31 85 


22 20 


14 50 




Berne-Interlaken-Briinig 


43.40 


30.25 


19.25 





Montrpti x-Zwfisirnmf>n-Rriinig 


66.70 


46.45 


27 30 


Martigny 




11.05 


7.70 


5.05 


Meiringen 


Berne-Brienz. . ... 


33.20 


23.15 


15. 10 


Montreux 


Montreux-Zweisimmen-Interlaken . . 


56.45 
4 15 


39.30 
2.90 


23.30 
1 90 


Merges 




2.15 


1.50 


1 -r- 


Neuchatel 




12.40 


8.65 


5 65 


Neuhausen 




44.75 


31 20 


20 35 


Olten 


Berne or Bienne 


26.90 


18.75 


12.25 


Palezieux 




3.50 


2.45 


1 .60 


Ragaz 




53.50 


37 30 


24 30 






43 25 


30 15 


19 65 


Rheinfelden 


Berne or Bienne-Olten 


33.50 


23.35 


15.25 




Bienne-Grenchen Nord-Basle 


33 85 


23 60 


15 40 


Rigi Kuirn 


Berne-Langnau-Lucerne-Vitznau . . . 


43.60 


33.95 


24.80 


Rorschach. . . 




53.30 


37.15 


24 25 


St. Gall... 




51.15 


35.65 


23.25 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



105 



From 

I AITSANT7F 


Via 


Sw 


iss Fra 


1CS 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


St. Margrethen 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich 


55 30 


38 55 


25 15 


St. Maurice .... 




8.60 


6 


3 90 


St. Moritz. 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne 


97 90 


67 


39 50 


Sargans 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne. . 


52.50 


36 60 


23 85 


Sarnen 


Berne-Interlaken-Bninig 


39 9.5 


27 85 


17 55 




Montreux-Zweisimmen 


63 25 


44 05 


25 80 


Schaffhausen 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich- Eglisau. . . . 


45.05 


31.40 


20.50 




Berne or Bienne-Zurich-Winterthur 


46 70 


32 55 


21 25 


Schwyz 


B erae-Langnau-Lucerne 


37 80 


26 35 


17 20 




Berne or Bienne- Aarburg-Lucerne . . 


41.95 


29.25 


19.05 


Sierre. 




18 


12 55 


8 20 


Sion 




15 35 


10 70 


7 


Solothurn 


Bienne 


21.30 


14.85 


9.70 


Spiez 


Berne 


23 95 


16 70 


10 90 




Brigue-Kanderste^ 


43 10 


30 05 


19 60 





Montreux-Zweisirnmen 


47.10 


32.80 


19.05 


Stans 


Berne- Langnau-Lucerne 


34 70 


25 05 


16 05 


Thalwil 
Thun 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne 


39.30 
21.15 


27.40 
14.75 


17.85 
9.60 


Thusis . . 


Montreux-Zweisimmen-Spiez 
Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne 


49.85 
67.30 


34.70 
46.60 


20.30 
29.30 


Vallorbe 




7.75 


5.40 


3.55 






3.15 


2 20 


1.45 


Visp 




22.60 


15.75 


10.30 


Waedenswil 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne 


41.45 


28.90 


18.85 


Weissenburg 


Berne : 


29.95 
41 50 


20.70 
29 05 


13.20 
16 90 


Winterthur 


Berne or Bienne-Zurich 


41.75 


29.10 


19. 






6.45 


4.50 


2.95 


Zermatt 


Visp 


47.40 


40.55 


24.80 


Zurich 


Berne or Bienne 


37.30 


26. 


16.95 


Zua 




36.50 


25.45 


16.60 




Berne or Bienne-Zurich or Lucerne. . 


41,10 


29,35 


19,15 


Zweisimmen. . . 


Montreuz . . 


33.70 


24. 


14.55 



106 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
LUCERNE 
to 


Via 


Swiss Franca 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 


Hochdorf-Lenzburg 


11.40 
38.45 
42.40 
21.80 
9.10 

4.65 

13.40 
15.85 

20.20 
21.50 
15.85 
19.15 
19. 
21.45 
38.45 

14.35 
6.60 
23.30 

15.35 
45.75 
47.85 
24.95 
25.10 
26.10 
47.40 
22.15 

27.10 
8.60 
16.70 
20.95 
24.25 
22.30 


7.50 
7.95 
26.80 
29.55 
15.20 
6.35 
19.10 
19.55 
3.25 
8.40 
9.35 
11.05 
17. 
15.50 
16.80 
11.05 
13.35 
13.25 
14.95 
26.80 
7.40 
10. 
4.60 
16.25 
20.45 
22.75 
9.20 
10.70 
31.15 
33.35 
17.40 
17.50 
18.20 
32.30 
15.45 
9.60 
18.90 
6. 
11.65 
14.60 
16.90 
15.55 


4.90 
5.20 
17.50 
19.30 
9.90 
4.15 
12.45 
12.75 
2.10 
5.50 
6.10 
7.20 
15.90 
11.05 
11.10 
7.20 
8.70 
8.65 
9.75 
16.80 
4.80 
6.55 

10.'60 
13.55 
15.05 
6. 
7. 
IS. 
21.75 
11.35 
11.40 
11.85 
18.55 
10.05 
5.85 
12.30 
3.90 
7.60 
9.55 
11.05 
9.45 




Olten 


Aigle. . 


Langnau-Berne. 


T. 




Airolo . . 




Altdorf 




Appenzell 


Zurich 




Thalwil-Uznach 


Arth-Goldau. 




Baden 


H o<^hdorf-Lenzberg 




Altstetten . . .... 


Basle 


Olten 


Beatenberg 


Konolfingen-Scherzligen, then boat. . 
Brunig-Interlaken, then trolley. .... 
Brunig-Interlaken, then boat 




M 


Berne. 




Aarburg . . 


Bienne 


Olten 




Langnau-Berne. 


Briue . 


Brunig-Interlaken-Kandersteg 
Hochdorf-Wildegg 
Olten . 


Bruce 


7 s 


Brunnen . . 




Buchs 


Thalwil 


Bulle 








Burpdorf 






Aarburg . 


Chateau-d'Oex 
Chiasso 


B runig-Interlaken-Spiez 




Chur 


Thalwil 


Colombier 


Olten-Bienne 


Davos-Platz 


Thalwil 


Del6mont 
Enejelbere 


Olten-Basle 

Stansstad 


Faido. . . 




Fluelen 




Frauenfeld 




Fribourg 


Langnau-Berne 






Frutuzen.. 





HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



107 



From 
LUCERNE 
to 


Via 


Swiss Franca 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Clasa 


Geneva 


Langnau-Berne. ... ... 


41.75 
53.30 

76.60 
17. 
17.65 
21.65 
40.20 

23.30 

15.05 
26.75 
38.10 
22.80 
9.60 
31 85 


29.10 
37.15 

53.35 
11.85 
12.30 
17. 
27.40 
21.51 
16.25 
16.25 
10.50 
18.65 
26.10 
15.90 
6.70 
22 20 


19. 

23.55 

31.80 
7.75 
8.05 
10.05 
15.70 
13.80 
10.60 
10.60 
6.15 
11.50 
15.45 
10.35 
4.35 
14.50 
19.05 
27.30 
19. 
23.25 
18.40 
19.80 
2.95 
19.50 
21.40 
4.05 
16.35 
18.25 
25.40 
15.45 
16.90 
10.80 
11.25 
7.75 
8.50 
4.20 
13. 
14.40 
9.85 
5.80 
7.05 




Rrnni^r-Tnterl^pn-Pernp, 





B runig-Interlaken-Zweisimmen- 
Montreux 


Glares 


Thalwil 






Grindelwald 


Briinig-Interlaken 


Gstaad. 


Brunig-Interlaken-Zweisimmen 
Thalwil-Zurich-Winterthur 
Thalwil-Uznach 


Heiden 


Herisau 




Zurich-Gossau. 






Kandersteg 
Klosters 


Brunig-Interlaken 


Thalwil 


Landquart 


Thalwil 


Langnau . . 








Ls^isanne 


Brunig-Interlaken-Berne 
Brunig-Interlaken-Zweisimmen 


43.40 
66.70 
43.25 
51.15 
40.45 
43.60 
7.10 
42.90 
47.05 
10.25 
36. 
40.10 
62.55 
34. 
37.15 
23.80 
24.75 
17. 
18.65 
9.25 
28.55 
31.70 
21.65 
12.70 
15.55 


30.25 
46.45 
30.15 
35.65 
28.20 
30.40 
4.95 
29.90 
32.80 
7.15 
25.10 
27.95 
43.55 
23.70 
25.90 
16.60 
17.25 
11.85 
13. 
6.45 
19.90 
22.10 
15.10 
8.85 
10.85 




Leuk 




Langnau-B erne-Lausanne 


Locarno. 








Lungern 


Briinig 


Martigny 


Langnau-B erne-Lausanne 




Meiringpn 


Brunig 


Montreux 


Langnau-B erne-Lausanne 


Aarburg-Berne. . . . 
Brunig-Spiez-Zweisirnmen 


Morges 


Langnau-Berne. 




Aarburp-Berne or Bienne . ... 


Neuchatel 


31ten-Bienne 
Langnau-B erne-Kerzers 


Neuhausen 








Olten 




Pal6zieux 








Ragaz 


Thalwil 




Thalwil-Pfaffikon 




Thalwil-Zurich-Meilen 



108 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
LTTPFRNF 


Vim 


Sw 


isaFrai 


1C* 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec. 
ond 
Class 


Third 
ClaM 


Rheinfelden 


Olten-Pratteln. 


15 85 


11 05 


7 20 


Rigi-Kulm 


Vitznau 




11 75 


10 30 


Romanshorn. . . 


Zurich 


29 30 


16 25 


10 60 


Rorschach. 


Zurich 


25 60 


17 85 


11 65 


St. Gall 


Zurich 


23 45 


16 35 


10 65 


St. Margrethen 


Zurich 


27 55 


19 20 


12 55 


St Maurice 




40 45 


28 20 


18 40 




Aarburg-Berne-Lausanne. . 


44 55 


31 05 


20 25 


St. Moritz. 


Thalwil 


66 05 


44 80 


25 05 


Sargans 


Thalwil 


20.65 


14.40 


9.40 


Sarnen 




3 50 


2 45 


1 60 


Sch affhausen 


Zurich-Eglisau 


17 35 


12 10 


7 90 




Zurich- Winterthur 


19 


13.25 


8 65 


Schwyz 




5 95 


4 15 


2 70 


Sierre 


Konolfingen-Kandersteg 




29.70 


19.35 




Brunig-Kandersteg 


44 75 


31.20 


19 65 


sion. ...".".".!!!!!! 


Langnau-Berne-Lausanne 
Konolfingen-Kandersteg 


49.70 


34.65 
31.55 


22.60 
20.55 




Brunig-Kanderstep 


47 35 


33 


20 85 





Langnau-B erne-Lausanne. 


47 20 


32 90 


21 45 





Aarburg-Berne-Lausanne 


51.35 


35.80 


23.35 


Solothurn 


Olten . 


14 85 


10.85 


6 75 


Soiez 


Konolfingen-Thun 




12 30 


8 05 




Brunig-Interlaken 


19.65 


13.70 


8.25 


Stans . 






2.85 


1 55 


Thalwil 




7 60 


5 30 


3 45 


Thun 


Konolfingen-Steffisburg 




10.35 


6.75 




Brunig 


22 30 


15.55 


9 45 


Thusis 


Thalwil 


35 45 


24 40 


14 85 


Vallorbe 


Olten-Bienne. 


37.15 


25.90 


16.90 




Langnau-Berne-Neuchatel 


38 30 


26.70 


17 40 


Vevey 


Langnau-Berne-Chexbres 
Langnau-Berne-Lausanne 


32.70 
35. 


22.80 
24.40 


14.85 
15.90 





Aarburg-Berne-Chexbres 


36. 


25. 10 


16 35 


Vevey 




39 10 


27 25 


17 80 




Brunig-Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux 


63.75 


44.40 


25.95 


Waedenswii 




9.60 


6.70 


4.35 




Biberbrucke . 


12 05 


8.40 


5 50 


Weissenburg 






16 35 


10 35 






25.70 


17.75 


10.55 


Winterthur. . . 




14.05 


9.80 


6.40 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



109 



From 




Sw 


issFra 


1CS 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Yverdon. 


Olten-Bienne. 


29 70 


20.70 


13.50 




Langnau-B erne- Neuchatel 


30 85 


21 50 


14 05 


Zermatt. ... 


Brunig-Kandersteg 


64.75 


52.65 


32. 


Zurich. 


Thalwil 


9 60 


6 70 


4.35 


Zug 




4.80 


3.35 


2.20 




Konolfingen-Thun-Spiez 




2.110 


12.55 




Brunig-Interlaken-Spiez. . . 


33.05 


22.50 


12.75 



110 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
LUGANO 


Via 


Sw 


issFra 


DCS 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 


Zup-Zuricb 


54 4"= 


37 95 


24 75 




Lucerne-OJten 


54.Q5 


38.30 


25. 


Aigle 


Lucerne-Langnau-Berne 


81 85 


57 05 


37 20 




Lucerne-Aarburg-Berne 


86 


59 95 


39 10 


Airolo . . 




21 80 


15.20 


9 90 


Altdorf 




34 65 


24 15 


15 75 


Appenzcll 


Zug-Zurich-Winterthur-Gossau 
Zug-Thalwil-Uznach 




44.75 
45.20 


29.20 
29.50 


Arth-Goldau 




38 95 


27 15 


17 70 


Baden 


Zug- A 1 tstetten 


50 20 


35 


22 80 


Basle 


Lucerne-Olten. . . 


59.25 


41.30 


26.95 






61 05 


42 55 


27 75 


Beatenberg 


Lucerne- Konolfingen-Scherzl, boat. . 
Lucerne-Interlaken. then by trolley 


63.60 


47.35 
45.75 


31.70 
30.85 





Lucerne- Interlaken, then by boat. 


64 90 


47 05 


30 90 


Berne. 




59 40 


41 40 


27 




Lucerne- A arburg 


62.55 


43.60 


28.35 


Bienne. 




62 40 


43 50 


28 35 






64 85 


45 20 


29 50 


Brigue 


Lucerne-Brunig'-Interlaken 


81.85 


57.05 


36.60 


Brugg . 


Immensee-Muri 
Zug-Thalwil . . 


49.20 
51.50 


34.30 
35.90 


22.35 
23.40 


Brunnen 




37.15 


25.90 


16.90 


Buchs 




60 10 


41.90 


27 30 






4 30 


3 


1 95 


Chur 


Thalwil 


61.75 


43.05 


28.05 


Colombier. 




68 50 


47.75 


31 15 






69 65 


48 55 


31 65 


Davos- Platz 


Thalwil-Landquart 


84.20 


57.95 


35.30 


Del6mont 


Lucerne-Olten-Basle 


65.50 


45.65 


29.80 


Engelberg 




53 20 


40. 


25 60 


Faido. 




16.50 


11.50 


7.50 


Fluelen 




35.15 


24.50 


16. 


Frauenf eld 
Fribourg 


Zug-Zurich 

Lucerne-Langnau-Berne 


53.50 
64.55 


37.30 
45. 


24.30 
29.35 






67 . 85 


47.30 


30.85 


Frutieen 




65 70 


45.80 


29.85 






85 30 


59 45 


38 80 






87.30 


60.85 


39.70 





Lucerne-Aarburg-Berne or Bienne. . 


88.60 


61.75 


40.30 


Glarus 


Thalwil 


53.80 


37.50 


24.45 


Goeschenen 




25.90 


18.05 


11.80 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



111 



From 
LUGANO 


Vim 


Sw 


riss Frm 


ncs 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Class 


Grindelwald 


Lucerne-Brunig-Interlaken 


64.95 


47 25 


29 85 


Herisau 


Zug-Thalwil-Uznach 


60 10 


41 90 


27 30 


Interlaken 


Lucerne-Thalwil-Zurich-Gossau 
Lucerne-Brunig 


58 45 


41.90 
40 75 


27.30 
26 55 


Kandersteg .... 


Lucerne-Briinig-Interlaken. 


70 15 


48 90 


31 30 


Klosters 




74 90 


51 75 


32 20 


Landquart 


Thalwil 


59 60 


41 55 


27 10 


Langnau .... 




53 15 


37 05 


24 15 






75 40 


52 55 


34 30 




Lucerne- Aarburg-B erne 


78 55 


54 75 


35 70 


< 


Lucerne- Aarburg-Bienne 


79.55 


55.45 


36.15 


Leuk 


Lucerne-Stefnsburg-Kandersteg. . . . 




59 


38 50 




Lucerne-Langnau-B erne-Lausanne 


94 75 


66 05 


43 05 


Locarno. 




9 10 


6 35 


4 15 


Lungern 


Lucerne 


50 50 


35 20 


22 75 


Lucerne.' 




43 60 


30 40 


19 80 


Martigny 




86 30 


60 15 


39 25 




Lucerne- Aarburg-B erne or Bienne . 


90 45 


63 05 


41 10 


Meiringen 




53 65 


37 40 


23 80 


Montreux 


Lucerne-Langnau-B erne 


79.40 


55.35 


36 10 




Lucerne- Aarburg-B erne 


82 70 


57 65 


37 60 


M 


Lucerne- Aarburg-Bienne or Berne 


83 50 


58 20 


37 95 


Morges 


Lucerne-Langnau-B erne 


77.40 


53.95 


35 20 




Lucerne- Aarburg-B erne or Bienne . 


80 70 


56 25 


36 70 


Neuchatel 




67 15 


46 80 


30 55 




Lucerne-Langnau-B erne 


68.35 


47.65 


31 05 


Neuhausen 


Zug-Zurich-Ep:lisau 
Zug-Zurich-Winterthur 


53.80 
55 45 


37.50 
38 65 


24.45 
25 20 


Olten 


Lucerne 


52.80 


36.80 


24 


Pal6zieux. . . . 


Lucerne-Langnau-B erne 


71 95 


50 15 


32 70 






75 25 


52 45 


34 20 


Ragaz 


Thalwil 


58.45 


40.75 


26 55 


Rapperswil. . 


Thalwil- Pfaffikon 


49 50 


34 50 


22 50 


Rheinfeldeii '.'.'.'.'.'. 


Zug-Thalwil-Meilen 
Zug-Alstetten-Brugg 


52.30 
58.25 


36.45 
40.60 


23.80 
26 50 




Lucerne-Olten-Pratteln 


59 25 


41 30 


26 95 


Rigi-Kulm. 




46 90 


36 25 


26 30 


Romanshorn 
Rorschach 
St. Gall 
St. Margrethen. . . 


Zug-Zurich 
Zug-Zurich 
Zug-Zurich 
Zug-Zurich 


60.10 
62.40 
60.25 
64.35 


41.90 
43.50 
42. 
44.85 


27.30 
28.35 
27.40 
29.25 


St. Maurice . . 


Lucerne-Langnau-Berne. . . 


83.85 


58.45 


38.10 



112 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
LUGANO 
to 


Via 


Swiss Franca 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Clasa 


St. Maurice 
St Moritz. 


Lucerne- Aarburg-Berne 


87.95 
102.85 
57.45 
46.90 
54.15 
55.80 
37.65 

93.25 

90.60 
94.75 
58.25 

63.05 
46.45 
44.40 

72.25 
80.70 
81.85 
76.25 
78.40 
79.40 
82.50 

83.85 
46.40 
46.40 

69.10 
50.85 

73.30 
74.45 
46.40 
41.60 

76A5 


61.30 
70.45 
40.05 
32.70 
37.75 
38.90 
26.25 
60.05 
65. 
61.90 
63.15 
66.05 
40.60 
42.70 
43.95 
33.25 
30.95 
40.75 
50.05 
56.25 
57.05 
53.15 
54.65 
55.35 
57.50 
56.70 
58.10 
32.35 
32.35 
46.70 
48. 
35.45 
50.75 
51.10 
51.90 
32.35 
29. 
51.45 
52.75 


40. 
41.75 
26.10 
21.30 
24.60 
25.35 
17.10 
39.15 
42.40 
40.35 
41.20 
43.05 
26.50 
27.85 
28.05 
21.35 
20.20 
26.55 
31.55 
36.70 
37.20 
43.65 
35.65 
36.10 
37.50 
37. 
37.30 
21.10 
21.10 
30.15 
30.35 
23.10 
33.10 
33.30 
33.85 
21.10 
18.90 
32.35 
32.55 


Thalwil 


Sargans 


Zug-Thalwil 


Lucerne 
Zug-Zurich-Eglisau 
Zug-Zurich-Winterthur 


Schaffhausen 


Schwyz . . 


Sierre 


Lucerne-Steffisburg-Kandersteg 
Lucerne-Langnau-B erne-Lausanne. . 
Lucerne-Steffisburg-Kandersteg 
Lucerne- Langnau-Berne-Lausanne. . 
Lucenre-Aarburg-B erne-Lausanne.. . 
Lucerne-Olten 




Sion 




< 


Solothurn 
Spiez 


Lucerne-Konolfingen-Thun 






Stans 


Lucerne 


Thalwil 


Zug 


Thun 


Lucerne- Konolfingen 


Thusis 


Thalwil 


Vallorbe 


Lucerne-Olten-Bienne 




Lucerne-Langnau-Berne-Neuchatel.. 
Lucerne-Langnau-B erne-Che xbres. . 
Lucerne-Langnau-B erne-Lausanne. . 
Lucerne-Aarburg-Berne-Chexbres. . . 
Lucerne- Aarburg-Bienne 
Lucerne- Konolfingen-Kandersteg . . . 
Lucerne-Brunig-Kandersteg 
Thalwil 


Vevey 




i 


Viso 


v isp. . 


Waedenswil 






Weissenburg 


Lucerne- Konolfingen-Thun 
Lucerne-Brunig 


Winterthur. . . 
Yverdon 




Lucerne-Langnau-Fribourg 
Lucerne-Olten-Bienne 







Lucerne-Langnau-Berne-Neuchatel. . 
Zug-Thalwil 


Zurich 


Zug .... 


Goldau 


Zweisimmen 


Lucerne-Konolfingen-Spiez. 







HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



113 



From 
SCHAFFHAUSEN 
to 


Via 


Swiss Francs 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 


Eglisau-Zurich 


16. 

32.50 
19.65 

15.20 
16.85 
11.55 
13.20 
17. 
22.45, 

37.35 
38.65 
39,60 
40.90 
47.70 
49.20 
29.20 
30.85 
28.05 
29.55 
55.60 
55.60 
13.05 
14.70 
17.20 
18.85 
21.45 
25.60 

25.45 
27.10 
58.45 
60.10 
27.25 
28.25 
31.15 
49.55 
50.70 
23.30 
26.95 


11.15 
22.65 
13.70 
12.90 
14.85 
10.60 
11.75 
8.05 
9.20 
11.85 
15.65 

22.45 
28.75 
29,20 
30.46 
33.25 
34.30 
20.35 
21.50 
19.55 
20.60 
38.75 
38.75 
9.10 
10.25 
12. 
13.15 
14.95 
17.85 
29.80 
17.75 
18.90 
40.75 
41.90 
19. 
19.70 
23.80 
33.80 
34.60 
16.25 
21.70 


7.30 
14.80 
8.95 
8.40 
9.70 
6.90 
7.65 
5.25 
6. 
7.75 
10.20 

18.95 
19. 
20,85 
20.70 
21.70 
22.35 
13.30 
14.05 
12.75 
13.45 
24.70 
25.30 
5.95 
6.70 
7.80 
8.55 
9.75 
11.65 
19.60 
11.55 
12.30 
26 . 55 
27.30 
12.40 
12.85 
15.55 
19.55 
20.05 
10.60 
13.75 


Airolo 


Eglisau-Zurich-Zug 


Altdorf 


Eglisau-Thalwil-Zug 


Appenzell 


Winterthur-Goldau 


Arth-Goidau. 


Konstanz-Romanshorn-Herisau.. . . 
Eglisau-Zurich-Thalwil 




Winterthur-Zurich-Zug 


Baden 


Eglisau-Zurich . ... 


Winterthur- Eglisau-Zurich. 


Basle 


Koblenz-Stein 


Beatenberg 


Eglisau-Zurich-Brugg 
Zurich-Brunig-Interlaken, then 
trolley ... ... 


Bellinzona 


Zurich-Brunig-Interlaken, then boat 
Olten-Berne-Thun; then trolley 
Olten-Berne-Scherzligen; then boat. 
Eglisau-Thalwij-Zug 
Winterthur-Zurich-Zug 
Eglisau-Zurich-Olten 


Berne 
Bienne 


Winterthur-Zurich-Olten 


Eglisau-Zurich 


Winterthur-Zurich 


Brigue 
Brugg 


Eglisau-Zurich-Brunig-Kandersteg. . 
Eglisau-Zurich-Berne-Kandersteg. . . 
Eglisau-Zurich 


Brunnen 


Eglisau-Thalwil-Zuc" 




Winterthur-Zurich-Zug 


Buchs 


Konstanz-Rorschach 

Eglisau-Zurich-Thalwil 




Bulle . . 


Eglisau-Zurich-Olten-Berne 


Burgdorf 


Eglisau-Zurich-Olten 
Winterthur-Zurich-Olten 




Chiasso 


Eglisau-Thalwil-Zug 


Winterthur-Zurich-Zug 


Chur 


Eglisau-Zurich . . . 






Colombier 
Davos-Platz . . . 


Eglisau-Olten-Bienne 


Eglisau-Zurich 






Deldmont 
Engelberg. . . 


Koblenz-Stein-Basle 


Eglisau-Thalwil-Lucerne. . . 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
SCHAFFHAUSEN 
to 


Via 


Swiss Franca 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 

Class 


Engelberg 
Faido 


WinterthuT-Zurich-Lucerne 


28.60 
37.65 
39.30 
19.15 
20.80 
34.50 
36. 
39.45 
39.80 
53. 
55.30 
56.60 
19.15 
28.25 
29.90 
38.70 
47.95 

leTso 

32.20 
41.10 
43.90 
44.25 
40.25 
41.40 
24.95 
26.10 
26.90 
45.05 
46.70 
14.05 
15.70 
60.40 
60.40 
64.55 
21.80 
51.15 
52.65 
24.25 
17.35 


22.85 
26.25 
27.40 
13.35 
14.50 
24.05 
25.10 
27.50 
27.75 
36.95 
38.55 
39.45 
13.35 
19.70 
20.85 
28.95 
35.40 
12.15 
14.95 
10. 
11.50 
22.45 
28.65 
30.60 
30.85 
27.60 
28.40 
17.40 
18.20 
18.75 
31.40 
32.55 
9.80 
10.90 
42.10 
42.10 
45. 
15.20 
35.65 
36.70 
16.90 
12.10 


14.50 
17.10 
17.85 
8.70 
9.45 
15.70 
16.35 
17.35 
18.10 
24.10 
25.75 
25.75 
8.70 
12.85 
13.60 
17.95 
20.75 
8.15 
9.75 
6.55 
7.50 
14.05 
18.70 
19.35 
20.10 
16.45 
16.95 
11.35 
11.85 
12.25 
20.50 
21.25 
6.40 
7.15 
26.85 
27.45 
29.35 
9.90 
23.25 
23.95 
10.80 
7.90 


Eglisau-Zurich-Thalwil . ... 




Winterthur-Zurich-Zug 


Fluelen 


3glisau-Thalwil-Zug 
Winterthur-Zurich-Thalwil-Zug 
Eglisau-Zurich-B erne. 








Winterthur-Zurich-Berne 




Eglisau-Zurich-B runig-Spiez 




3glisau-Zurich-Berne-Spiez 


Geneva 


Eglisau-Zurich-Olten-Bienne 




3glisau-Zurich-Olten-Berne 
Winterthur-Zurich-Berne or Bienne. 
Eglisau-Zurich-Thalwil . 


t 


Glarus 




Eglisau-Zurich-Zug 




iVinterthur-Zurich-Zug 
2glisau-Zurich-Brunig-Interlaken. . . 
3glisau-Zurich-Berne-Interlaken 
Konstanz-Rorschach 


Grindelwald 




Heiden. 




^.orschach-St. Gallen. 








Etzwilen-Konstanz 




Thalwil-Brunig. 






Kandersteg. 


Eglisau-Zurich-B runig-Spiez 




Eglisau-Zurich-Olten-Spiez. 


Klosters. 






Konstanz-Rorschach 










Langnau 


Eglisau-Zurich-Lucerne. 


Lausanne 


3glisau-Zurich-Berne or Bienne. . . . 
kVinterthur-Zurich-Beme or Bienne. 
Eglisau-Zurich-Wettingen 




Lenzburg. 


Leuk 


Winterthur-Zurich-Wettingen 


2glisau-Zurich-Brunig-Kandersteg. . 
Sglisau-Zurich-Berne-Kandersteg. . . 
2glisau-Zurich-Lausanne 







Linthal 


Locarno 


3glisau-Thalwil-Zug 


Lungern 
Lucerne. . . 


3glisau-Thalwil-Lucerne 
Eglisau-Zurich-Thalwil 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



115 



From 




Sw 


iss Fra 


nca 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Lucerne 
Martigny. . 


Winterthur-Zurich-Thalwil 
Eglisau-Zurich-Lausanne 


19. 
56.10 


13.25 
39.10 


8.65 
25.50 


Meinngen 


Eglisau-Thalwil-Lucerne 


27.55 


19.20 


11.95 


Montreux 
Merges 


Eglisau-Zurich-Lausanne 
Winterthur-Zurich-Lausanne 
Bglisau-Zurich-Olten-Eienne 
Eglisau-Zurich-Olten-Berne 


49.20 
50.65 
45.05 
47.35 


34.30 
35.30 
31.40 
33. 


22.35 
23.05 
20.50 
21.55 





Winterthur-Zurich-Olten-Bienne 


49 


34.15 


22.30 


Neuchatel 


Eglisau-Zurich-Olten-B ienne 


32 85 


2? 90 


14 95 




Winterthur-Zurich-Olten-Bienne. . . . 


34.50 


24.05 


15.70 


Neuhausen. . . 




50 


.35 


25 


Olten . 


Eglisau-Zurich 


18 15 


12 65 


8 25 




Winterthur-Zurich. . . . 


19 80 


13.80 


9. 


Pal6zieux . 


Eglisau-Zurich-Olten-B erne 


41 95 


29 25 


19 05 


Ragaz 




23 95 


16 70 


10 90 


r^ 


Konstanz-Rorschach 


24 95 


17 40 


11 35 


Rheinfelden 


Koblenz 


14 20 


9 90 


6 45 


Rigi-Kulm 


Eglisau-Zurich-Lucerne-Vitznau 


29 10 


23.85 


18.20 




Winterthur-Zurich-Lucerne-Vitznau. 


30. 75 


25 


18 95 


Romanshorru 


Konstanz. 


10 75 


7 50 


4 90 


Rorschach. 




13 20 


9 20 


6 00 




Winterthur 


16 70 


11 65 


7 60 


St. Gall 


onstanz-Romanshorn 


14.85 


10.35 


6.75 






15 85 


11 05 


7 20 





Eglisau-Bulach- Winterthur 


16 50 


11 50 


7 50 


St. Margrethen . . . 


Konstanz-Rorschach 


15.20 


10.60 


6.90 


St. Manrice 


Eglisau-Zurich-Berne or Bienne- 










Lausanne. 


53 65 


37 40 


24 40 





iVinterthur-Zurich-Lausanne 


55 15 


38.45 


25.05 


St. Moritz. 




68 35 


46 40 


26 10 




Konstanz-Rorschach 


69 35 


47 10 


26 55 


Sargans 




22 95 


16 


10 45 


?, 


Konstanz-Rorschach . . 


24 10 


16 80 


10 95 


Schwyz ... 


Eglisau-Zurich-Thalwil-Zug 


16 70 


11 65 


7 60 






18 15 


12 65 


8 25 


Sierre 




61 90 


43 15 


27 55 





Sglisau-Zurich-Berne-Kandersteg. . . 


61.90 
fp 90 


43.15 
43 85 


28.15 
28 60 


Sion 


Eglisau-Zurich-Lausanne 


60 40 


42 10 


27 45 






64 5 S 


45 


28 75 







64 55 


45 - 


29 35 


Solothurn . . , 


Eglisau-Zurich-Olten. . . 


23.95 


16.70 


10.90 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 
SCHAFFHAUSEN 
to 


Vi 


Swiss Franca 


First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 




Winterthur-Zurich-Olten 


25.60 
36.80 
37. 
20.20 
21.85 
9.90 
11.40 
34.35 
37.75 
38.75 
46.20 
46.05 
48.05 
49.70 
57.10 
57.10 
20.65 
17.65 
42.85 
43. 
4.95 
38.80 
40.45 
7.95 
9.40 
12.70 
14.20 
50.20 
50.35 


17.85 
25.65 
25.80 
14.95 
16.10 
6.90 
7.95 
23.95 
26. 
26.70 
32.20 
32.10 
33.50 
34.65 
39.80 
39.80 
14.40 
12.30 
29.70 
29.80 
3.45 
27.05 
28.20 
5.55 
6.55 
8.85 
9.90 
34.45 
34.55 


11.65 
16.15 
16.80 
9.45 
10.20 
4.50 
5.20 
15.60 
15.90 
16.35 
21. 
20.95 
21.85 
22.60 
25.35 
25.95 
9.40 
8.05 
18.45 
19.15 
2.25 
17.65 
18.40 
3.60 
4.30 
5.80 
6.45 
20.65 
21.35 


Spiez 


Eglisau-Zurich-Brunig 
Eglisau-Zurich-Berne 




Stans 






SVinterthur-Zurich- Lucerne 


Thalwil 






Thun 


Eglisau-Olten-Berne 


Thusis 






Konstanz-Rorschach 


Vallorbe 
Vevey 


3glisau-Zurich-Bienne, 


Eglisau-Zurich-Lausanne 





Winterthur-Zurich-Lausanne 
Eglisau-Brunig-Kandersteg 
3glisau-Zurich-Berne-Kandersteg. . . 
3glisau-Zurich 


Visp. . . 


7. 

Wallenstadt .' '. '. 
Weesen 


Bglisau-Zurich-Briinig-Spiez 


Winterthur ,'...'.. 


Eglisau-Zurich-Beme-Spiez 


Yverdon 


Eglisau-Zurich-Olten-Bienne 
Winterthur-Zurich-Olten-Bienne. . . . 
Eglisau 
Winterthur 


Zurich 
Zue 








Zweisimrnen 


Eglisau-Zurich-Brurig-Spiez 




Eglisau-Zurich-Berne-Spiez 



W TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



117 



Prom 

ZURICH 


VI 


Sw 


isa Fra 


ica 


Co 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Aarau 




8 25 


5 75 


3 75 


Airolo 


Thalwii-Zug 


24.75 


17.25 


11.25 


Altdorf 


Thalwil-Zug 


11 90 


8 30 


5 40 


Appenzell 


Gossau 




12 55 


8 20 




St. Gallen-Gais 





14.40 


9.40 


M 


Meilen-Wattwil 


__ 


14 85 


9 70 


Arth-Goldau. 


Thalwil-Zug 


7 45 


5 20 


3 40 


Baden. . 




3 80 


2.65 


1.75 


Basle 


Brugg-Stein. 


14 70 


10 25 


6 70 




Olten 


17. 


11.85 


7.75 





3ulach-Koblenz 


18. 


12.55 


8 20 


Beatenberg. 


Thalwil-Brunig-Interlaken then trol- 










ley 


29.60 


22.05 


15.40 


M 


Thalwil-Brunig-Interlaken then boat 


30 90 


23 35 


15 45 


Bellinzona 


Olten-Berne-Thun, then trolley 
Olten-Berne-Scherzligen, then boat 
Thalwil-Zug 


31.85 
33.15 
39.95 


23 . 80 
25.05 
27.85 


17.35 
17.15 
18.15 


Berne 


Olten 


21 45 


14 95 


9 75 




Lucerne 


25.45 


17.75 


11.55 


Bienne 


Olten 


20.30 


14.15 


9.25 


Brigue 


Thalwil-Brunig-Kandersteg 


47 85 


33 35 


21 15 




Olten-Berne-Kandersteg 


47.85 


33.35 


21.75 


Brugg 




5.30 


3.70 


2.40 


Brunnen . . 


Thalwil-Zug 


9 40 


6 55 


4 30 


Buchs 


Sargans . . , 


17.85 


12.45 


8.10 


Burgdorf 


Olten 


17.65 


12.30 


8.05 


Chiasso 


Thalwil-Zug 


50.65 


35.30 


23.05 


Chur 


Sargans 


19.50 


13.60 


8.85 


Colombier 


Olten-Bienne. 


26 25 


18.30 


11.95 


Davos-Platz 


Sargans 


41 80 


28.40 


16 


Del6mont 


Stem-Basle 


21.15 


14.75 
16 80 


9.60 
10 95 


Engelberg 




19 20 


16 30 


10 20 




Affoltern or Thalwil 


20.65 


17.30 


10.90 


Paido 


Thalwil-Zug 


29.90 


20.85 


13.60 


Fluelen 


Thalwil-Zug 


11.40 


7 95 


5 20 


Fribourg 
Frutigen 


Olten-Berne 
Thalwil-Brunig-Spiez. 


26.60 
31.70 


18.55 
22.10 


12.10 
13.80 




Olten-Berne-Spiez 


32 05 


22 35 


14.55 


Geneva 

Glares.;:.".::".:: 


Olten-Bienne 
Olten-Berne 
Thalwil or Meilen. . 


45.25 
47.35 
11.40 


31.55 
33. 
7.95 


20.55 
21.55 
5.20 



118 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 

7TTRir"TT 


Vim 


Sw 


issFrai 


ICS 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 

Class 


Third 

Class 




Thalwil-Zug 


21 50 


14 30 


9 30 


Grindelwald 


Thalwil-Briinif-Interlaken 


30 95 


23 55 


14 40 




Olten-Berne-Interlaken. . . . 


40 20 


30 


19 20 


Gstaad 




^9 65 


34 


?0 05 




Olten-Berne-Spiez . .-.' 


49 80 


34 10 


20.75 


Heiden 


Rorschach 




14 60 


9 50 




Gossau 




9 70 


6 30 




Degersheim-Wattwil 


16 5C 


11 50 


7.50 


Interlaken 


Thalwil-Drunig 
Olten-Berne 


24.45 
33.35 


17.05 
23 . 25 


10.50 
15.15 


Kandersteg 


Thalwil-Brunig-Spiez 


36 15 


25 20 


15 85 




Olten-Berne-Spiez 


36 50 


25 45 


16 60 


Klosters 


Thalwil-Meilen 


32.50 


22.20 


12.90 


Landquart 


Thalwil-Meilen 


17 20 


12 


7 80 




Thalwil 


19 15 


13 35 


8 70 




Olten-Burgdorf 




14.85 


9.70 


Lausanne 


Berne or Bienne 


37 30 


26 


16 95 






6 30 


4 40 


2 85 




Dietikon-Bremgarten-Wohlen 




4 65 


3.75 


M 


Brunig-Kandersteg 


52 65 


36 70 


23 35 


Leuk 




52 65 


36 70 


23 35 




Olten-Berne-Kandersteg 


52.65 


36.70 


23.95 


M 


Berne or Bienne-Lausanne . . 


56 80 


39 60 


25 80 


Linthal 




14 OS 


9 80 


6 40 


Locarno 
Lugano 


Thalwil-Zug 
Thalwil-Zug 


43.40 
46. 4C 
16 5C 


30.25 
32.35 
11 50 


19.75 
21.10 
7 30 


Lucerne. 


Thalv.-il 


9.60 


6.70 


4.35 




Affoltern 


11 05 


7 70 


5 05 


Marti^ny 


Berne or Bienne-Lausanne 


48.20 


33.60 


21.90 


Meirin^en 


Thalwil-Lucerne. 


19.80 


13.80 


8.35 


Montreux 




41 45 


28 90 


18 85 




Thalwil-Brunig-Spiez 
Olten-Berne-Zweisimmen 


72. 
72. ir 


50.15 
50.25 


29.75 
30.45 


Morges 
Neuchatel! ....... 


Olten-Bienne 
Olten-Berne 
Olten-Bienne 


37.30 
39.60 
25.10 
30.40 


26. 
27.60 
17.50 
21.20 


16.95 
18. 
11.40 
13.80 






7 45 


5 20 


3 40 


Olten .... 


Winterthur 


9.10 
10.40 


6.35 
7.25 


4.15 
4.75 


Palezieux. . 


Olten-Berne.. . 


34.15 


23.80 


15.55 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



119 



From 

yiT'RTnFI 


VI* 


Sw 


iss Frai 


ics 


to 




First 
Class 


Sec- 
ond 

Class 


Third 

Qasfl 




Thalwil or Meilen 


16 20 


11 30 


7 35 


Rheinfelden 


Brugg. . . 


11.90 


8.30 


5.40 




Koblenz 


13 40 


9 35 


6 10 


Rigi-Kulm 


Thalwil-Zug-Goldau 


20.45 


18.20 


12.05 


Romanshorn 


Thalwil-Lucerne-Vitznau 
Winterthur 


21.35 
13 70 


18.45 
9 55 


14.65 
6 25 


Rorschach 


Winterthur 


16.20 


11.30 


7.35 




Meilen-Uznach-St. Gallen 


21.15 


14.75 


9.60 


St Gallen 


Winterthur 


14 05 


9 80 


6 40 






18 3^ 


12 80 


8 35 


St. Margrethen 


Rorschach 


18 15 


12 65 


8.25 




M eilen-Uznach-Degersheim 


22 80 


15 90 


10 25 


St. Maurice 


Berne or Bienne-Lausarme 


45.90 


32. 


20 85 


St. Moritz. 


Thalwil or Meilen 


60.60 


41. 


22.55 




Thalwil or Meilen 


15 20 


10 60 


6 90 


Schaffhausen 


Eglisau 


7.95 


5.55 


3.60 


Schwyz 


Winterthur 

Thalwil-Zug 


9.40 
8.95 


6.55 

6.2.5 


4.30 
4.05 


Sierra. . 


Thalwil-Brunig-Kandersteg 


54.15 


37.75 


24. 




B erne-Kandersteg 


54 15 


37 75 


24 60 







55 15 


38 45 


25 05 


Sion .... 


Berne or Bienne-Lausanne .... 


52 5C 


36.60 


23.85 




Thalwil-Brunig-Kandersteg 


56 80 


39 60 


25 20 


M 


Thalwil-Berne-Kandersteg. . . 


56.80 


39.60 


25.80 


Solothurn 


Olten 


16.20 


11 .30 


7.35 


Soiez 


Thalwil-Brunig-Interlaken 


29 05 


20 25 


12 60 


Stans . 


Olten-Berne 
Thalwil-Lucerne 


29.20 
12.45 


20.35 
9.55 


13.30 
5.90 




Affoltern-Lucerne. 


13 90 


10.55 


6 60 


Thalwil 




2 15 


1 50 


1 


Thun 


Olten-Beme. 


26.60 


18.55 


12.10 




Thalwil-Lucerne-Konolfingen. 




17 05 


11 10 


Thusis 


Thalwil 


30. 


20.60 


12.35 


Vallprbe 


Olten-Bienne 


38.65 

45 25 


26.95 
31.55 


17.55 
20 55 


Vevey 


Berne-Chexbres 


38.30 


26.70 


17.40 




Lausanne 


40.30 


28.10 


18.30 


Visp 


Thalwil-Brunig-Kandersteg 


49 35 


34.40 


21.85 


T 


Olten-Berne-Kandersteg 


49.35 


34.40 


22.45 


Wallenstadt 


Thalwil or Meilen 


12.90 


9. 


5.85 


Weesen 


Thalwil or Meilen . ... 


9.90 


6.90 


4.50 


Weissenbursr. . . 


Thalwil-Briinuz-Smez.. . 


35.10 


24.30 


14.90 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



From 

ZITRIPH 


VI* 


Sw 


issFrar 


ics 


to 




First 

Class 


Sec- 
ond 

Class 


Third 

Class 




Olten-Berne-Spiez 


35 25 


24 40 


15 60 


Winterthur 




4 45 


3 10 


2.05 


Yverdon 


Olten-Bienne. 


31 05 


21 65 


14 10 


Zermatt. . . 


Olten-Brunig-Kandersteg. . . 


74. 15 


59 20 


36 95 


ZUK 


Thalwil 


4 95 


3 45 


2 25 


*ug. . 


Affoltern 


6 45 


4 50 


2 95 


Zweisimmen 


Thalwil-Briinig-Spiez 


42.45 


29.05 


17.10 




Olten-Berne-Seiez . . 


42.60 


29.15 


17.80 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



121 



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122 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

MONEY 

Coins having legal circulation in Switzerland are : 
Gold 5, 10, 20, 40, 50 and 100 franc pieces of the Latin Union 
(France, Belgium, Greece, Italy and Switzerland), French 
5 and 10 franc pieces struck since 1856 only are accepted. 
Silver Only Swiss silver coins are accepted. 
Nickel Swiss 5, 10 and 20 centime pieces (Head). 
Bronze Swiss 1 and 2 centime pieces (Shield). 
(Travelers checks are, of course, accepted everywhere.) 

POSTAL AND TELEGRAPH RATES 

Letters DOMESTIC : Up to 250 grammes, 20 centimes. If 

within local radius 10 cts. 
FOREIGN: 40 cts. up to 20 gr. ; 20 cts. for every 20 

gr. above. 

Unless prepaid, letters are charged double postage. 
Post Cards DOMESTIC: Ordinary post cards 10 cts. Reply 

post cards 20 cts. 
FOREIGN: Ordinary post cards 25 cts. Reply 

post cards 50 cts. 
Printed Matter DOMESTIC : Up to 50 gr. 5 cts. ; 50-250 gr. 

10 cts. ; 250-500 gr. 20 cts. 
FOREIGN: Per 50 gr. 10 cts. Maximum 

weight 2 kg. 

Samples DOMESTIC: Up to 250 gr. 10 cts.; 250-500 gr. 20 cts. 
FOREIGN: Per 50 gr. 10 cts. Maximum weight 350 

gr. Minimum charge 20 cts. 
Commercial Papers DOMESTIC : Letter rates. 

FOREIGN: Per 50 gr. 10 cts. Maximum 
weight 2 kg. Minimum charge 
40 cts. 

Registration Fee DOMESTIC: 20 cts. 
FOREIGN : 40 cts. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 123 

Parcel Post DOMESTIC : Prepaid. Up to 500 gr. 30 cts.; 
500 gr., 2*/ 2 kg., 50 cts. ; 2^-5 kg. 80 cts. ; 
5-10 kg. 1 fr. 50 cts. ; 10-15 kg. 2 frs. ; above 
15 kg. according to weight and distance, 
Parcels not prepaid 10 cts. in addition to 
ordinary fees. Parcels with value declared 
5 cts. per 300 frs. in addition to the ordinary 
fees. 

FOREIGN : See postal tariff. 

Money Orders DOMESTIC: Amounts up to 20 frs. 20 cts.; 
from 20 to 50 frs. 25 cts. ; from 50 to 100 
frs. 30 cts.; for every 100 frs. above, 10 
cts. Maximum issued : ordinary and tele- 
graphic money orders 1000 frs. (cost of 
wire charged extra). 
FOREIGN: See postal tariff. 
Telegrams DOMESTIC: Fixed rates 50 cts. plus 5 cts. per 

word. 

FOREIGN: Fixed rate 50 cts. plus per word as 
follows: To Belgium 16.5 cts.; France 12.5 
cts.; Great Britain 24.5 cts.; Italy 12.5 cts.; 
Netherlands 16.5 cts. To the U. S. A. a single 
fee of from Fr. 1.50 upward per word is 
charged. 

DILIGENCE, AUTO-BUS SERVICES AND CARRIAGES 

While the old fashioned horse-drawn diligence still travels 
over a number of the famous Swiss Alpine roads, the modern 
auto-bus has been introduced by the postal authorities on 
many of the best known mountain passes. Owing to the great 
patronage enjoyed by these services, reservations for seats 
should always be made in advance. 

Carriages for private drives can be hired anywhere. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



LIST OF POST Auio-Bus AND DILIGENCE SERVICES OVER SOME 
OF THE PRINCIPAL ALPINE ROADS 



ROAD 

Simplon Pass 

Grimsel Pass 

Great St. Bernard 

Klausen Pass 

Furkapass 

Lukmanier Pass 

Oberalp Pass 

Umbrail Pass 

Maloja Pass 

Spliigen Pass 

St. Bernardino Pass... 

Ofen Pass 

Col de Pillon 

Val d'Herens 

Lenzerheide . 



BETWEEN 
Brigue-Iselle 

Meiringen-Gletsch (Rhone Glacier) 
Orsieres-St. Bernard Hospice 
Altdorf-Linthal 

Andermatt-Gletsch (Rhone Glacier) 
Disentis-Olivone-Acquarossa 
Disentis-Andermatt 
Sta. Maria-Stilfserjoch (Suspended) 
St Moritz-Chiavenna 
Thusis-Spliigen-Chiavenna 
Spliigen-Mesocco 
Zernez-Miinster 
Gstaad-Les Diablerets 
Sion-Evolene-Hauderes 
Chur-Lenzerheide-Tiefenkastel 



WALKING AND MOUNTAINEERING 

In a beautiful country like Switzerland one cannot and 
should not resist the lure of tramping and climbing. Moun- 
taineering is greatly aided by the efforts of the Swiss Alpine 
Club (S. A. C.) which has erected club huts in all important 
positions, and keeps them in admirable condition. Trained 
and experienced guides are to be had wherever necessary. 
Some of the most important points for starting high Alpine 
tours are: Grindelwald, Lauterbrunnen, Meiringen, Engel- 
berg, Kandersteg, Evolene, Zinal, Zermatt, Pontresina, etc. 

'Difficult high Alpine tours should not be undertaken with- 
out guides and not at all by travelers who have not had any 
previous training for this strenuous task. Inexperienced per- 
sons desirous of exploring the mountain regions should avail 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 125 

themselves of the fine and comparatively easy, but most 
attractive walking tours over the bridle paths and Alpine high- 
ways leading from beauteous pasture land to many unique 
points of view. 

AUTOMOBILING 

A few years ago it became more and more the custom 
among travelers bound for Europe to take their cars along, 
but whoever wanted to tour Switzerland in those days by the 
same means of transportation had to first carefully ascertain 
on which roads he was allowed to travel and which were 
barred to automobiles. As these latter routes just included 
some of the most famous Alpine passes, automobiling in the 
land of the Alps had to a great extent to be confined to the 
lower sections a state of things which was only appreciated 
and enjoyed by pedestrians. 

Lately, however, the majority of the Swiss population 
decided that special and even unusual efforts had to be made 
to revive the tourist industry and many of the cantons which 
are situated in the mountain districts consequently voted to 
open their hitherto closed Alpine thoroughfares to automobiles. 

In the Canton of Valais, where the Simplon Pass only was 
accessible in addition to the general highway skirting the 
River Rhone, these new rules opened the following additional 
roads to automobiles: 

The Furka Pass, connecting Brig with Gletsch and Gletsch 
with Andermatt on the Gothard route, in the Canton of UrL 

The road from Leuk to the Baths of Leuk. 

The road from Sion to the Mayens de Sion and the road 
from Sion to Evolene and Hauderes, in the beauteous 
Val d'Herens. 

The Great St. Bernard Pass from Martigny in the Rhone 
Valley to the time-honored Hospice. 

The road into the Val d'lllies to Champery. 



126 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

In the Bernese Oberland, to form a connection from Meir- 
ingen with the Furka Pass from the Rhone Glacier, the "for- 
bidden" sign was removed from the Grimsel Pass and the 
Klausen Pass, known as one of the best constructed and most 
beautiful roads, from a scenic point of view, was opened by 
the respective Cantons of Uri and Glarus. 

In connection with the previously open Alpine routes, the 
Briinig road from the Bernese Oberland to Lucerne and the 
Gothard road from Lucerne to the Canton of Ticino, Italian 
Switzerland, it is possible to tour the little Alpine Republic in 
every direction, with the only exclusion of the very mountain- 
ous Canton of the Grisons, where strenuous efforts are being 
made to also lift the ban. One section, St. Moritz-Maloja- 
Chiavenna, has actually been opened as a beginning and others 
are expected to follow suit. 

Of course, Switzerland does not allow "speeding." The law 
provides for 18 kilometres in towns and 40 kilometres in the 
open country, with special limitations for the high Alpine 
roads. But considering the nature of some of the mountain 
passes, with their frequent curves, as well as the short dis- 
tances between the towns and the presence of herds of cattle 
in certain Alpine districts, the reasonable automobilist is glad 
to conform to these regulations, inasmuch as the manifold 
charms of the country can only be truly enjoyed and engraved 
into the mind when a party travels at comparatively slow 
speed. 

The Federal Department of the Interior gives to each 
foreign motorist entering Switzerland a booklet printed in 
four languages, containing the automobile regulations of 
each canton, and all particulars about customs, responsibility, 
traffic and itineraries are furnished by the General Secretary 
of the Swiss Automobile Club, Geneva, or the respective 
secretaries of the sections Lucerne, Zurich and St. Gall. 

Like her neighbors, Switzerland belongs to the Association 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 127 

of International triptyques, permitting the motorist to pass 
the frontier of any country which is a member thereof with- 
out payment of duty. One part of the triptyque is retained 
by the frontier customs house when the car enters a foreign 
country, another is retained at the frontier place where the 
car leaves a country and the third part must be duly stamped 
and signed by the customs officials at the place of entry and 
exit and is retained by the motorist as evidence that the car 
has left the country in question. The triptyque represents a 
cash bond which the association puts up for its members. 
The money deposited may be collected upon presentation of 
the third part of the triptyque. 

Motorists can enter northwestern Switzerland from France, 
for instance, and proceed gradually from the lower valleys 
to the region of the Alps in one continuous route, without 
retracing their steps. 

A Tentative Itinerary 

Enter at Basle, follow the Rhine to Neuhausen (Falls of 
the Rhine) and Schaffhausen, Zurich, make a tour around the 
lake, Zug, Lucerne, skirt the lake, including the famous Axen- 
strasse, and proceed to Goschenen, Furka road to Gletsch 
(Rhone Glacier), Grimsel Pass to Meiringen, Lake of Brienz, 
Interlaken, Lake of Thun, Berne, side trips to Fribourg, 
Neuchatel, Soleure and Jura districts in general, Spiez, 
Zweisimmen, Montreux, Vevey, Lausanne, Geneva, follow the 
lake to Bouveret, Monthey, side trip to Champery, Martigny, 
visit the Great St. Bernard Hospice, Sion, Leuk, side trip to 
the Baths of Leuk, Brigue, Simplon Pass, Domodossola, 
Locarno and Lugano, in the Swiss-Italian lake district. 
Proceed to Italy or return into Central Switzerland over the 
St Gothard Pass. 

The above would be a tour which would afford the tourist 
an opportunity to make several cities and mountain resorts 



128 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

his headquarters for a prolonged sojourn. From these 
various centers an endless variety of delightful excursions 
can be made to the romantic nooks and corners off the beaten 
path each with an individuality of its own and, however 
sequestered the village may be, there is invariably one of 
those well known comfortable inns perfectly capable of cater- 
ing to unexpected guests. 

TENNIS 

This has become so favorite a sport in Switzerland that 
visitors can enjoy a game in whichever part of the country 
they may make a sojourn. International tournaments are 
arranged regularly. 

FISHING 

Devotees of this ever fascinating sport can tour the land 
of the Alps in all directions without ever having to deprive 
themselves of the companionship of a rod. While fishing is 
free in many parts of the country, the licenses and fishing 
tickets sold in the restricted sections are issued at ridicu- 
lously modest rates. 

BOATING 

Water sports in this land of lakes and rivers are, of course, 
at their best and the Swiss rowing and sailing clubs welcome 
foreign visitors as temporary members. International 
regattas are a special feature on many of the big lakes and 
Venetian night festivals are another attraction which are 
always enjoyed by the summer guests 

GOLFING 

List of Links 
(o) IS-hole courses: 

AIGLE, in the Rhone Valley, southeast of the Lake of 
Geneva. Links of the Montreux Golf Club. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 129 

MONTANA, in the Rhone Valley. 
SAMADEN, in the Grisons. 

(J) 9-hole courses: 

AXEN-FELS, on the Lake of Lucerne, private links of the 

Palace Hotel, Axen-Fels. 
FLIMS-WALDHAUS, in the Grisons 
LAUSANNE, at the Ferrae des Autels, in the vicinity of 

the city. 

LES RASSES, in, the Jura. 
LUCERNE on the Dietschyberg. 
MALOJA in the Upper Engadine, Grisons. 
RAGAZ in Eastern Switzerland. 
ST. MORITZ in the Upper Engadine, Grisons. 
ZURICH, on the Ziirichberg. 

INFORMATION OFFICES 

At almost every resort of note an Official Inquiry Office 
can be found, where tourists may obtain free information 
and literature about the country. Before starting on a tour 
it is advisable to take advantage of this gratuitous informa- 
tion service. Below is a list of the places maintaining such 
offices : 

Aarau, Adelboden, Aeschi, Altdorf, Andermatt, Appenzell, Arosa, 
Baden, Basle, Beatenberg, Beckenried, Bellinzona, Berne, Brigue, 
Brunnen, Bienne, Brissago, Burgdorf, Cevio, Champery, Chateau-d'Oex, 
Chaux-de-Fonds, Chexbres, Coire, Davos, Delemont, Diablerets, Ebnat- 
Kappel, Einsiedeln, Engelberg, Faido, Fischenthal, Flims-Waldhaus, 
Fliielen, Fribourg, Geneva, Gersau, Glarus, Glion, Grindelwald, Griinen, 
Gstaad, Heiden, Hochdorf, Ilanz, Interlaken, Kandersteg, Klosters, 
Kreuzlingen, Langnau, Lausanne* Lichtensteig, Locarno, Locle, Lucerne, 
Lugano, Lungern, Martigny, Meggen, Meiringen, Montreux, Morges, 
Morschach, Nesslau, Neuckatel, Neuhausen, Neuveville, Olten, Pontre- 
sina, Porrentruy, Ragaz, Rapperswil, Rheinfelden, Richterswil, 
Rorschach, Samaden, Ste-Croix, St. Gall, St. Imier, St. Moritz, Sarnen, 
SchafFhausen, Schwyz, Silvaplana, Soleure, Speicher, Spiez, Tarasp, 
Territet, Teufen, Thun, Thusis, Trogen, Vevey, Vitznau, Wadenswil, 
Wallenstadt, Wattwil, Weesen, Weggis, Wengen, Winterthur, Yverdon, 
Zermatt, Zug, Zurich, Zweisimmen. 



WINTER IN SWITZERLAND 

To the uninitiated the land of the Alps means merely the 
embodiment of a summer fairyland, a bewildering vision of 
glorious color combinations from the luxuriant valleys to the 
realm of snow-crowned peaks ; that it offers equal and alto- 
gether unique possibilities in winter is not so generally 
known. 

When the glories of autumn have faded away in the 
November mists and when the trees and pastures begin to 
look cold and bare, then all of .a sudden over night arrives 
Jack Frost and with his fairy wand he silences the babbling 
mountain streams and closes the turquoise eyes of the Alpine 
lakes. Villages and mountains are now reflected in the 
smooth expanse of ice, as in a mirror. The frequently half 
a yard thick sheet of ice is so glass-like and transparent, that 
one can see through it, not only the bed of the lake, in deli- 
cate tones of gray and green, but shoals of fish swimming 
between the rotted trees which project like skeletons from 
the bottom. Who will be the first to risk himself on that 
ice which does not hide the terrors of the deep! The dar- 
ing youngsters, of course, and then in time everyone. 

And while all rejoice over this initial phase of the season 
of white, another event follows closely the first a myriad of 
snowflakes suddenly decide on their opening ball. How 
swiftly they dance, how merrily they chase each other! Like 
ever so many butterflies they descend on the ground and when 
the morning sun rises above the clearly outlined silhouettes 
of the mountains we behold a new world, a fairyland of 
resplendent magnificence. 

130 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 131 

The tiny sunburnt villages are almost sunk in snow ; on the 
roofs it is piled like gigantic cushions; lakes and rivers sleep 
contentedly under a thick, spotless cover and trees and bushes 
are proudly wearing the decoration of winter. The moun- 
tains even have undergone a change in their shapes, the snow 
allowing no angles. Infinitely white and soft lies hill and 
vale under the canopy of the bluest of skies and in the 
embrace of the most glorious sunshine. The atmosphere is 
so clear and dry and the rays of the sun which fall through 
the vast ocean of pure air have such a power that outdoor 
life becomes the order of the day. 

With toboggans and skates the children open the season of 
mirth and toboggans and skates also find favor with their 
elders who promptly cast away all prejudice and rigid rules 
of etiquette. "Play" becomes the order of the day with all, 
and every newcomer joins the happy throng. The rejuvenat- 
ing atmosphere of the winter season in the Alps has already 
started its magic work. Faces which yesterday yet appeared 
appallingly tired and weary begin to look young and gay and 
before the day is over all customs and conditions of life seem 
to be turned topsy-turvy. 

Skating is the oldest recognized form of ice sport in that 
part of Europe and time has developed it into an art which 
charms the onlooker by the gracefulness of its movements 
and astonishes by the cool daring of the swift rushes. A 
thorough proficiency in the same is essential for the many 
other diversions which are now offered on the ice. The 
lover of the favorite summer game of tennis finds a substitute 
right on the polished rink in hockey, and those who are on 
the look-out for another beneficial muscular exercise will cer- 
tainly enjoy the exciting and sociable game of curling. In 
addition there is an almost unlimited variety of comical 
gymkhana stunts, and fancy dress carnivals on the brightly 
illuminated rinks at night are another lure of the ice. 



132 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Then there are the snow sports, with tobogganing, of 
course, as their Mentor. But the toboggan, which enjoys the 
greatest popularity to-day is a mighty different vehicle from 
the simple wooden sleigh of olden times. It is now described 
as a "skeleton" and consists of light, but exceptionally strong 
steel framework with a yard long padded seat on which the 
rider lies flat, steering the craft with hands and feet. Like 
an arrow it shoots up the ice walls of the curves and at that 
moment in which the onlooker expects an accident it makes 
the turn into the furrow and up the following ice wall, and 
so on, until it reaches its destination. 

The social form of tobogganing is bobsleighing, so called 
from the movements which the participants make during the 
ride. A bobsleigh is composed of two pairs of steel runners, 
one behind the other, on which rests a wooden seat, about ten 
feet long and about a foot from the ground. As a sport bob- 
sleighing is no doubt most interesting to the captain and the 
brakesman, they being responsible for the party, with the rest 
of the crew coming near to being just passengers. Yet much 
depends upon the prompt obedience of the crew to the 
steersman's orders, for it is easily possible that a corner 
might have been safely coasted round if they had obeyed his 
call to lean inward. 

"Tailing" expeditions have also become very popirlar. A 
long row of toboggans are hitched tail-like to horse-drawn 
sleighs and the occasional rushes around corners and unex- 
pected hills cause such laughter that everybody in the neigh- 
borhood knows that a tailing party is winding its way 
through the wintry world. 

Ski-ing, when introduced in Switzerland some years ago, 
became an immediate favorite, as it affords unlimited possi- 
bilities. Boys and girls coming to school from every side of 
the valley on skis even if they are only made of a couple of 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 133 

barrel staves and the postman delivering mail with their aid, 
are characteristic sights of the mountain vfllej'S. 

To the skier belong the valley, the slopes, the forests and 
mountains the whole vast stretch of untrodden snow. Ski- 
ing affords a means of enjoying nature in her glorious winter 
beauty and brings one into contact with those remote huts 
and farms which are almost buried under the tremendous 
quantities of snow. 

A very remarkable development of ski-ing is ski-jumping. 
At the present time almost every Swiss winter-sports center 
has its own "jumping hill" and the Swiss have become so 
expert in this sport that good jumping can be seen almost 
anywhere in the mountains. Amongst stay-at-homes ski- 
jumping is very little understood, and photographers usually 
make the mistake of taking their pictures from under the 
jump, being anxious to make the jumper appear high in the 
air. Such photographs lead invariably to the question, "How 
high do they jump?" while it is really the distance traveled 
through the air that counts. 

The skier starts at the top of a steep incline, he gathers 
pace until he reaches the take-off, where at great speed and 
with a spring he leaves the ground and flies through the air, 
touching the earth again any distance from thirty to forty- 
eight metres below the take-off, according to the skill of the 
individual. 

In ski competitions the "slalom" runs are being included 
more and more. This is a kind of obstacle race in which it 
is necessary to go between tree trunks and marked obstacles 
in fine curves and swings. Next to the actual jumping the 
slalom run makes the greatest demands on the knowledge and 
skill of the ski-runner. 

Ski-kjoring, i. e., ski-running behind a harnessed horse, is 
a much favored variation of ski-sport. For the exercise of 
the same one requires even roads, meadows or frozen, snow- 



134 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

covered lakes. Necessarily one must be a good ski-runner 
and horse driver as well in order to enjoy this phase of 
winter sport. 

Winter sport is greatly facilitated by the numerous moun- 
tain railways which run toboggan trains during the season. 
One can travel a couple of stations upwards and arrive at the 
starting point on a mountain road without exertion and delay. 
Then comes the glorious, thrilling descent to the valley on 
toboggan, bobsleigh or ski; or vice versa, go down first and 
return by train to winter quarters. 

Races, competitions, sleigh drives, ski excursions, ice 
carnivals and indoor entertainments in the evening are daily 
occurrences during the season of white. Age vies with youth 
in the merrymaking and the wonderful sunshine and delicious 
air implant a sort of reckless happiness into every heart. 

A few decades ago it used to be Santa Claus whom the 
children hailed as the mystic donor of their various presents, 
consisting of rosy-cheeked apples, dried fruit, nuts and home- 
made cookies. They were simple, sensible little gifts, but 
nevertheless highly appreciated by the juvenile recipients- 
Later on the "Christkindli/' a lovely angel with wings, 
gradually started to take old Santa's place in many districts 
of Switzerland. Christkindli brought a wonderful, brilliantly 
lit Christmas tree, decorated with glittering threads of silver 
and gold and heavily laden with manifold gifts. 

An ancient legend trying to explain the origin of the 
Christmas tree relates that it was about the year 800 A.D. 
when there was a certain St. Winfried who went to preach 
Christianity to the people of Northern Europe. One Christ- 
mas Eve these people were gathered round a huge oak to 
offer a human sacrifice, according to the teaching of the Druid 
priests, but St. Winfried hewed down the great tree, and as 
it fell there appeared in its place a tall young fir. When St 
Winfried saw it, he cried to the people that here was come 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 135 

a new tree, unstained by blood, that in pointing to the sky 
showed them, what they were to worship. 

"It is the tree of the Christ Child," he said, "carry it to the 
castle of your chief and in future, instead of the bloody rites 
of the Druids held in the forest glades, your worship shall 
be in your own homes, with ceremonies that speak the mes- 
sage of peace and good will to all. The day will come when 
there shall not be a house wherein on the birthday of Christ 
the whole family shall not gather round the fir tree in memory 
of this day and to the glory of the Only God." 

Gradually the pretty custom of the Christmas tree, born in 
the north, was also adopted in other countries. Candles were 
added to give it a still more festive appearance and in this 
connection it is explained that the Romans already burned 
candles at the feast of Saturn as a sign of good cheer, while 
the Jews burned candles during the feast of the Dedication, 
which happened to fall about the same time as that of Saturn 
in the Roman calendar. It is quite possible that for this 
reason there would have been many candles burning all over 
Palestine about the time of the birth of Christ, and from this 
comes the term of "Feast of Lights," which is the name used 
in the Greek Church for Christmas Day. 

Many old and quaint customs are still prevalent in Switz- 
erland during this period of the year. 

If you want for instance to find out how the weather will 
be during the next year, just cut an onion into half; peel off 
twelve layers, one for each month and fill the same with salt. 
Those peelings which contain damp salt the next morning 
predict rainy weather for the respective month. 

To the unmarried folk Christmas holds that magic key to 
the unknown future. On Christmas eve, when the bells are 
calling to worship in the village church, you must drink three 
times from nine different fountains and you will then behold 
your husband or wife-to-be standing at the church door. 



136 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Miraculous powers are attributed to Christmas. Children 
born on that day can see ghosts and are able to tell your 
future. Water can be changed into wine and, if you are 
some sort of an adept in the mysterious art of magic, you 
are at that time able to safeguard yourself against all bodily 
injuries. Farmers in certain parts of the country believe that 
if they fertilize the soil, or tie a band of straw around the 
trunk of their fruit trees during Christmas week, the same 
will bear especial quantities of fruit. 

On Christmas night, for one brief hour the dumb beasts 
are said to be able to converse in human language. Misfor- 
tune, however, befalls the inquisitive who takes it upon him- 
self to listen. 

Thus Yule days in Switzerland have a particular fascina- 
tion. Into the brilliant atmosphere of jolly winter sports and 
pastimes and a supremely happy crowd of humanity pene- 
trates the delicate perfume of days gone by, of ancient 
legends and sayings still held in reverence by a 20th Century 
generation, and the most modern-minded of humans becomes 
a willing victim of the indescribable charm of a real old- 
fashioned Christmas. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



137 



SOME OF THE BEST KNOWN WINTER SPORT CENTERS 



Feet a/s 

Adelboden 4,447 

Airolo 3,755 

Andeer 3,212 

Andermatt 4,738 

Arosa 5,7 10 

Beatenberg 3,766 

Bergtin 4,475 

Severs 5,6i8 

Campfer 6,000 

Caux 3,677 

Celerina 5,656 

Chamby 2,460 

Champery 3,423 

Champex 4,821 

Chateau d'Oex 3,181 

Chesieres 3>97O 

Corbeyrier 3,280 

Davos 5,n5 

Diablerets 3,963 

Disentis 3,773 

Engelberg 3.3 15 

Goschenen 3,640 

Grindelwald 3,468 

Gryon 3, 716 

Gstaad 3,452 

Heiden 2,657 

Kanderstag 3,840 

Klosters 3,965 

Lauterbrunnen 2,6 r 5 

Lenk 3,527 

Lenzerheide 4,844 

Le Pont 3,313 

Les Avants 3,230 

Les Plans 3>6i2 



Feet a/s 

Les Rasses 3,950 

Leuk 4,625 

Leysin 4,150 

Maloja 5,960 

Montana 5 , 1 20 

Montboyon 2,608 

Mont Pelerin 2,953 

Mont Soleil 4, i oo 

Morgins 4,405 

Miirren 5,385 

Parpan 4,956 

Pontresina 5 ,9 1 5 

Rigi-Kaltbad 4,700 

Rigi-Klosterli 4,262 

Saanen 3,382 

Salvan 3,035 

Samaden 5,670 

St. Antonien 4,655 

St. Cergue 3,432 

Ste. Croix 3,635 

St. Moritz 6,055 

Sils-Maria 5, 940 

Silvaplana 5,958 

Tief enkastel 2,81 1 

Villars 4,120 

Waldhaus-Flims 3,621 

Weissbad 2,680 

Weissenstein 3, 920 

Wengen 4,243 

Zermatt 5,315 

Zuoz 5,615 

Zucerberg 3,070 

Zweisimmen 3,2 1 5 



CLIMATE OF SWITZERLAND 

HEALTH RESORTS AND WATERING PLACES 

The crowning feature of Switzerland is its wonderful 
climate, which has a beneficial effect on all visitors and 
especially those who visit the land of the Alps in quest of 
health. The marvelous invigorating and curative effects of 
the dry and pure atmosphere which distinguishes the Alpine 
regions have become a such well-known factor that the 
country is not only hailed as "The Playground of Europe," 
but as "A World Sanatorium." 

When primarily in search of a health resort, a person will 
do well in order to secure immediate benefit to consult a 
physician as to the altitude he should choose in his particular 
case. Health resorts, offering, however, at the same time 
every opportunity for sport and social diversions, can be 
found in altitudes from 1300-6500 feet and higher. 

Still another most valuable curative factor in Switzerland 
is to be found in the great wealth of mineral springs. In 
108 health resorts run springs which have been chemically 
analyzed and put to medical use, and a further number of 
springs, long known or only recently discovered, are awaiting 
analysis and use. These health springs are scattered all over 
the country, the Alpine districts leading with 70. Primitive 
man was already guided by his instinct to the beneficial 
waters emerging here and there from the earth and Switzer- 
land, being of ancient culture, has a traditional knowledge of 
her mineral springs from prehistoric times onward. When 
the pipes of the springs of St. Moritz in the Engadine were 

138 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 139 

relaid, an ancient enclosure of the spring was discovered in 
the shape of three larch-trees. In the hollows of these were 
found various objects dating back to the bronze period, and 
similar prehistoric finds were also made at Baden (Argovie), 
Loeche (Valais) and Yverdon (Vaud). While many of the 
watering places are situated in districts which are rarely 
frequented by foreign visitors, others, at the same time, 
famous for their exquisite natural beauty, have been devel- 
oped to a degree of perfection, vicing with the finest spas 
of the -world. 



THE MINERAL SPRINGS AND SPAS OF 
SWITZERLAND 

1. SIMPLE ALKALINE SPRINGS 

Indications: Chronic and subacute catarrh of the stomach 
and intestines, gall-stones, liver and bladder complaints, 
stones in the kidneys, diabetes, obesity, gout, arterio- 
sclerosis. 

Fideris-Bad (see page 218). Season: 1st June to 15th Sep- 
tember. 

Tarasp-Schuls (see page 216). Season: May to September. 

2. MURIATED ALKALINE SPRINGS 

Indications: As above. 

Passugg (see page 210). Season: May to October. 
Val Sinestra (see page 217). Season: 1st June to 15th 
September. 

3. ALKALINE SALINE OR SULPHATED SPRINGS 

Indications: Chronic catarrh of the digestive organs, atony 
of the stomach and intestines, constipation, nervous 
dyspepsia, hemorrhoids, hyperaemia of the liver, 
catarrhal and chronic inflammatory conditions of the bile- 
ducts, metabolic and renal disorders, obesity, its con- 
comitant and consequent conditions, uric acid diathesis, 
stones in the kidneys, rheumatism, after-effects of 
tropical diseases. 

Tarasp-Schuls (see page 216). Season: May to September. 

140 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 141 

4. ARSENICAL SPRINGS 

Indications: Anaemia, chlorosis, chronic articular and mus- 
cular rheumatism, gout, hysteric and neurasthenic condi- 
tions, general weakness, chronic cutaneous diseases 
(eczema, psorasis), chorea, scrofulosis, Basedow's disease. 

Acquarossa (see page 221). Season: July to end of Sep- 
tember. 

Val Sinestra (see page 217). Season: 1st June to 15th 
September. 

5. IRON OR CHALYBEATE SPRINGS 

Indications: Anaemia, chlorosis, hysteric and neurasthenic 
conditions, general weakness, Basedow's disease, dis- 
orders of the menstrual flux, convalescence, recreation, 
sexual anomalies. 

Acquarossa (see page 221). Season: July to end of Sep- 
tember. 

Rothenbrunnen (see page 210). Season: Beginning of May 
to end of September. 

Gimel-Les Bains (see page 165). Season: 1st June to 30th 
September. 

Passugg (see page 210). Season: May to October. 

Andeer (see page 211). Season: 1st June to 15th September. 

Fideris-Bad (see page 218). Season: 1st June to 15th 
September. 

Gurnlgel (see page 180). Season: June to end of Septem- 
ber. 

Disentis (see page 219). Season: 1st June to 30th Sep- 
tember. 

Tarasp-Schuls (see page 216). Season: 1st June to 15th 
September. 

Grimmialp (see page 189). Season: June to 15th Sep- 
tember. 



142 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Tenigerbad (see page 219). Season: 1st June to JOtii 
September. 

Margins (see page 167). Season: Middle of June to middle 
of September. 

Bergun (see page 211). Hydropathic treatment from 15th 
May to 1st October. 

Val Sinestra (see page 217). Season: 1st June to 15th 
September. 

San Bernardino (see page 221). Season: 15th June to 15tk 
September. 

Rigi-Scheidegg (see page 196). Season: June to Sep- 
tember. 

St. Morits-Bad (see page 212). Season: June to Sep- 
tember. 

6. CALCAREOUS SPRINGS (cold) 

Indications: Anaemia, chlorosis, convalescence, chronic mus- 
cular and articular rheumatism, general weakness, gout, 
sciatica, female diseases, atony of the stomach and intes- 
tines, nervous dyspepsia, chronic pharyngeal and laryngeal 
catarrh. 

Montr eux (see page 166). Season: Spring, Autumn and 
Winter. 

Aigle (see page 167). Season: 15th April to 15th October. 

Yverdon (see page 155). Season: May to October. 

Andeer (see page 211). Season: 1st June to 15th September. 

Tenigerbad and Waldh'duser (see page 219). Season: 1st 
June to 20th September. 

San Bernardino (see page 221). Season: 15th June to 15th 
September. 

7. CALCAREOUS SPRINGS (warm) 

Indications: Rheumatism, arthritis deformans, gout in all its 
forms, contractions of the joints, stiffness, chronic 




Phot- Sterner 



The Cresta Run, St, Moritz 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 143 

sciatica, chronic cutaneous diseases, eczema, prurigo, 
lichen, psoriasis, acne, furuncles, phlebitis, venous conges- 
tions, chronic tumors of the leg, hemorrhoids, chronic in- 
flammation of the female sexual organs, scrofulosis of 
the respiratory organs. 

Loeche-Les-Bains (see page 172). Season: 1st June to 30th 
September. 

8. SALINE SPRINGS 

Indications: Convalescence, prophylaxis of weak children 
who have a predisposition to tuberculosis, diseases of the 
blood, anomalies of constitution and chronic intoxication, 
complaints of women, diseases of the heart (treatment as 
at Nauheim), affections of the bones and joints (tuber- 
culosus and non-tuberculosus); after-treatment after 
traumatism and surgical operations; residual exudates in 
serous membranes, neuralgia, sciatica, paresis, hemiplegia, 
tabes dorsalis, catarrh of the upper respiratory organs, 
cutaneous diseases. 

Rheinfelden (see page 149). Season: March to November. 
Cures during the winter also. 

Aigle (see page 167). Season: 15th April to 31st October. 

Bex (see page 168). Season: 1st April to end of October. 

Lavey-Les-Bains (see page 168). Season: 15th May to 30th 
September. 

9. THERMAL BATHS 

(Ordinary mineralized waters with no special properties) 
Indications: Chronic rheumatism, gout, diseases of the bones, 
joints and muscles, neuralgia, chronic sciatica, neuritis, 
nervous dyspepsia, diseases of the female sexual organs. 
Ragaz (see page 204). Season: 15th May to 15th October. 
Pfdfers-Bad (see page 204). Season: End of May to Sep- 
tember. 



144 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

10. MURJATED SPRINGS WITH IODIDES 
Indications: Scrofulosis, diseases of the glands, exu dates, 

sclerosis of the vessels, chronic myocarditis, chronic 

nephritis, complaints of women, metabolic diseases, 

cutaneous diseases. 
Rothenbrnnnen (see page 210). Season: May to end of 

September. 
Passugg (see page 210). Season: May to October. 

11. PEAT, MUD AND SAND BATHS 
Indications: Rheumatism, gout, exudates, arthritis deformans, 

diseases of the bones and joints, arthralgia. 
Lavey-Les-Bains (see page 168). Season: 15th May to 30th 

September. 

Acquarossa (see page 221). Season: July to September. 
Andeer (see page 211). Season: 1st June to 15th September. 

12. SULPHUR SPRINGS (cold) 

Indications: Chronic affections of the upper respiratory 
organs and bronchi, chronic catarrh of the stomach and 
intestines, furuncles, chronic rheumatism, cutaneous dis- 
eases, diseases of the lymphatic system. 

Heustrich (see page 188). Season: June to September. 

Alvanenbad (see page 211). Season: 1st June to 15th 
September. 

Le Prese (see page 215). Season: June to September. 

Champery (see page 167). Season: 15th May to end of 
September. 

Lenk (see page 189). Season: 10th June to 20th September. 

Gurnigel (see page 180). Season: June to September. 

13. SULPHUR SPRINGS (warm) 

Indications: Muscular and articular rheumatism, gout, gravel, 
neuralgia, chronic sciatica, catarrhal affections of the 
upper respiratory organs, metallic intoxications. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 145 

Schinsnach (see page 151). Season: 1st May to end of 

September. 

Baden (see page 150). Season: All the year round. 
Lavey-Les-Bains (see page 168). Season: 15th May to 30th 

September. 

Yverdon (see page 155). Season: May to October. 
Loeche-Les-Bains (see page 172). Season: 1st June to 30th 

September. 



THE TOUR 

At least six weeks are required for a visit to Switzerland's 
chief places of scenic interest, but glimpses of the most 
beautiful and most characteristic features of the country may 
be enjoyed in a more limited period, provided a careful pro- 
gram is made in advance. A little forethought and study will 
materially add to the enjoyment of such a tour, which should 
be planned so as to take in several of the typical sections. 
Thus, whenever possible, the itinerary should include a trip 
on one of the lakes, a coaching or automobile tour over one 
of the passes, an ascension of one of the mountains by rail- 
road, a visit to one of the famous ravines or gorges and a 
walk through both an old and modern town. In this manner 
the tourist will gain impressions of Switzerland and the Swiss 
which will forever remain pleasant memories. 

Entering the country at Basle, the gate of Switzerland, as 
it is frequently described, where many of the principal rail- 
way lines of Europe meet, the following route may be con- 
sidered as the most beneficial to see the country on an initial 
visit to the land of the Alps and can serve as a basis for 
journeys of shorter or longer periods. 

NORTHWESTERN SWITZERLAND AND THE JURA 
Basle, 860 feet a/s, the old Basilea of the Romans, is safely 
enthroned upon the stately banks of the Rhine, where that 
majestic river, dividing the town into two sections, known as 
Klein-Basle and Gross-Basle, dashes in a sweeping curve 
towards the north. 

After gaining its independence in the early Middle Ages, 

146 






HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 147 

the city acquired international fame after the Council of 
Basle (1431-1448), one of the consequences of which was the 
foundation of the university in 1460. The city then became 
the residence of the most learned scholars and celebrated 
artists of that period. In order to better protect herself 
against the covetous Austrian nobility of the neighboring 
Alsace and Breisgau, Basle joined the Swiss Confederation in 
1501 and ever since has remained a Swiss city. 

Basle's characteristic landmark is the Cathedral, since the 
Reformation known as the Miinster. Like its sister temples 
on the banks of the Rhine it is a truly magnificent building 
and altogether unique in its lines and coloring. The material 
used is a brilliant red sandstone and the roof is covered with 
green, white and red tiles that look like enamel. Emperor 
Henry II founded the Miinster in 1010 A.D., and the orginial 
structure was in the Byzantine style ; in 1356, a fire, resulting 
from an earthquake, did great damage and the church was 
consequently rebuilt in Gothic and consecrated anew. The 
northern portal, known as St. Callus Gateway, remains of the 
original Romanesque construction, its statues, reliefs and 
ornamentations being well preserved. The choir is also of 
that period, while the western front, towers and other parts 
are of the later Gothic. 

To the east, adjoining the Cathedral, is a beautiful old 
cloister, wonderful in its solemn effect, with some of the 
richest and most varied tablets in Renaissance and Baroque 
style. 

The Cathedral terrace, shaded by fine old chestnut trees and 
known as the Pfalz, overlooks the Rhine Valley and the Black 
Forest. 

Nearby on the Market Square, is the Town Hall, an imposr- 
ing Gothic structure with a remarkable, delicately carved 
front Its iron gate is like a great window shade, embroidered 
i open-work. All over there are statues, doors of canred 



148 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



wood and in a prominent position, the coat-of-arms of Basle, 
held on one side by the Holy Virgin and on the other side by 
Henry II. 

As an ancient seat of culture and learning, Basle possesses 
a most noteworthy Historical Museum in the old Barfiisser 
Church. Among the many priceless treasures shown therein 
are relics of the Basle "Death Dance," the Cathedral plate, 
tankards, bowls ^ud jewels of the various Guilds; the carved: 
altar of St. Mary Calanca; war trophies and weapons; heir- 
looms of Erasmus of Rotterdam, etc. A curiosity with a 
rather humorous touch is a quaint piece of mechanism, known 
as the Lallenkonig. This figure used to stand on the bridge 
tower, facing Klein-Basle, and pulled out its tongue every 
quarter of an hour with absolute regularity. At one time the 
figure was taken to be an insult to Klein-Basle, on the other 
side of the Rhine; this, however, is now denied and it is said 
that the Lallenkonig was meant to be an expression of cordial 
contempt for all outsiders in general. At all events it was 
removed in 1839. 

Opposite the entrance to the museum is a handsome foun- 
tain with exquisite figures representing Samson and Delilah. 
Basle, like other mediaeval cities in Switzerland, prides itself 
with several handsome fountain statues. Of these, the 
Fischmarktbrunnen, a 15th Century Gothic piece of work, the 
Spalenbrunnen, with bagpipe players and peasants' dance, after 
Diirrer and Holbein, and the Rebhausbrunnen, in German 
Renaissance, are the most noteworthy. 

In the Augustinergasse is the Museum with a picture gallery 
interesting for its paintings and drawings by the two great 
artists Hans Holbein and Arnold Bocklin, both natives of 
Basle. 

Basle is a veritable gem for well-preserved mediaeval 
architecture. Besides the Cathedral, 10 churches dating from 
the Middle Ages are still existing; among these St Alban's 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 149 

with early Romanesque cloisters ; the Dominican Church with 
a graceful vane on the roof, and the Barfusser Church now 
containing the Historical Museum with an exceedingly high 
chancel. Among the public buildings of the Middle Ages, 
there are some richly decorated guild houses, also imposing 
City Gates of real artistic value. The Spalengate, built at the 
beginning of the 15th Century and which, in 1473 was deco- 
rated by a front structure and graceful statues, the work of 
Sarbach, is declared to be the most beautiful specimen, but 
the St. Johanngate and the St. Albangate are also interesting 
mediaeval reliques. 

A noble monument portraying Helvetia presenting the 
crown of victory to the heroes of St. Jakob an der Birs, com- 
memorates that glorious battle, which was fought in the 
environs of Basle on August 26, 1444. "Our souls to God, our 
bodies to the enemy" was the war cry of the gallant 1300 
confederates who opposed an army of 40,000 barbaric 
Armagnac invaders, led by the Dauphin Louis (afterwards 
Louis XI). 

Another exquisite monument, the Strassburger Denkmal, 
presented to Basle in 1895, by Baron Herve de Gruyer, com- 
memorates the assistance given in 1870 to the besieged City 
of Strassburg, when delegates from Basle and Zurich took 
the women, children and aged people of that city into 
Switzerland. 

The neighboring village of Augst "Augusta Rauracorum" 
boasts of remains of a Roman settlement with a spacious 
amphitheatre. 

Rheinfelden (940 feet a/s), is renowned as a delightful 
Spa with excellent saline springs, the strongest of the kind 
on the European continent. It is a quaint old town with walls 
and towers dating back to the feudal days of the Middle Ages. 

Stein-Sacldngen, the latter sung in Scheffel's immortal 
poem, and Brugg are passed en route to 






150 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Baden (1256 feet a/s), the Aquae Helvetiae of the 
Romans. It is an acknowledged fact that in Roman times the 
principal military road of Helvetia led through Baden, con- 
necting the watering-place with Vindonissa, the great Helve- 
tian fortress, six miles away. In the year 1872, beyond the 
Roman road in Baden, in the direction of Vindonissa, there 
were discovered, in a fine state of preservation, the founda- 
tions of a large connected block of buildings, which, when 
fully excavated, revealed fourteen apartments of various sizes, 
from 10 to 88 feet in length. The peculiar architecture of 
the same, the numerous medical and surgical instruments and 
utensils found there, the proximity of the before-mentioned 
fortress, where Roman soldiers were stationed, the thermal 
springs and the excellent arrangement already existing for 
their use, all these facts make it clear that the building in 
question served as a Roman military hospital. 

Later on in the Middle Age, the little watering-place, which 
is picturesquely situated on the River Limmat, was a fortress, 
and down to the 15th Century often the residence of the 
Counts of Hapsburg. With these ancient historic connections 
the town possesses an Old World charm of its own and inas- 
much as its equipments as a spa are faultless, this Swiss Baden 
is constantly gaining in favor. Nearby beckons 

Windisch, the one-time Roman town of Vindonissa 
with an amphitheatre and ruins of the Castle of Hapsburg, 
the cradle of the former Austrian Imperial family. The 
Castle of Hapsburg dates back to the year 1020. The tower, 
with walls eight feet thick, is the only part now standing which 
belonged to the original structure ; in it, the room said to- have 
been occupied by Rudolph of Hapsburg is still shown. The 
Government of the Canton of Argovie, which is the owner of 
the ancient stronghold, has had the same renovated a few 
years ago. The adjoining dwelling house, where refreshments 
are sold, is rented to a farmer. Further on is 




1 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 151 

Wildegg, with another stately feudal residence dating 
back to the 12th Century. 

Schinznach (1046 feet a/s), is another well-known water- 
ing place with hot sulphur springs of highly curative qualities. 

Aaran (1171 feet a/s), a busy, intellectually inclined 
town at the foot of the Jura, presents a captivating combina- 
tion of the mediaeval and modern. 

Olten (1220 feet a/s), is important as one of the busiest 
railway junctions in the country. 

Pursuing our course along the foot of the Jura, we presently 
reach 

Soleure or Solothurn (1298 feet a/s). In the years 
272 AJX, -when the Allemans threatened the Romans, a fortifi- 
cation was erected on the river Aar, where the present city 
itands and remnants of walls of the same are still visible in 
the Lowengasse and on the cemetery. A legend relates that 
Ursus and Victor, two of the early Christians who had fled to 
Soleure from Agaunum, the present Saint Maurice in the 
Rhone Valley, in the year 303, had been tortured and put to 
death in Soleure by the Romans on account of their faith. 
The Cathedral is dedicated to their memory and their suffer- 
ings are immortalized by three reliefs on the facade. 

The Cathedral of St. Ursus at Soleure, built by Pisoni in 
1762-73 on a site, which, according to tradition, was formerly 
occupied by a Roman temple to Apollo, is considered to be the 
finest specimen of late Italian Renaissance in Switzerland. 

Two interesting fountains, bearing statues of Moses and 
Gideon, stand at each side of the imposing marble stairs which 
lead in three times eleven steps to the entrance. Eleven 
marble altars of exquisite design, individual masterpieces of 
as many artists, add to the beauty of the interior, which has 
been conceived in the shape of a Latin cross. The church 
treasury in the sacristy contains a very ancient collection of 
artistic work in metal and textile fabrics. 



152 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

While the bustle of modern commercial life has trans- 
formed the placid mediaeval quarters of Soleure the city 
now being recognized as one of the leading Swiss watch- 
making centers there still exists in the vicinity a little oasis 
of absolute worldly peace, the Hermitage in the romantic 
gorge of St. Verena. 

Rocks and grottoes, clad with a verdure and foliage of the 
most refreshing green, form the entrance to this appealingly 
lovely shrine; a brook saunters merrily along the little road 
and a choir of golden-voiced, feathered songsters offer their 
never-ending anthems. 

Then comes a burst of golden sunlight, an opening into a 
tiny, but luxuriant patch of land, the hermit's domain. To the 
right stands his dwelling house a little gem in a setting of 
rocks, shrubbery and flowers to the left are two chapels of 
diminutive dimension, but altogether ideal for quiet medita- 
tion, A goat and a few chickens contribute to the hermit's 
support and help to enliven this picturesque retreat. 

Weissenstein (3920 feet a/s), with Kurhaus in close prox- 
imity, is frequented as a summer resort and for winter sports. 
It is one of the favorite points of view in Western Switzerland, 
affording an unobstructed outlook on the whole Alpine 
chain, from the Eastern Alps to the peaks of Savoy. A little 
farther on is 

Bienne or Biel (1332 feet a/s), situated on the lake of the 
same name and dating back to those early days of the lake- 
dwellers, is a thriving place with important watch factories. 
Many delightful excursions can be made in this district, among 
which the "Taubenloch" Gorge and the heights of Macolin 
are particular favorites. 

One railway line branches off to Moutier, Delemont and 
Porrentruy and at Glovelier, a station just before reaching 
Porrentruy, another branches off to Saignelegier, Noiremont 
and La Chaux-de-Fonds. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 153 

Still another line serves the industrial towns of Sonceboz 
and St. Imier (2670 feet a/s) whence a cable railway climbs 
to Mont Soleil, (4100 feet a/s), a favorite summer resort and 
winter sport place. From St. Imier the Mount Chasseral 
(5280 feet a/s) can be easily reached. 

La Chaux-de-Fonds (3267 feet a/s) and Le Locle (3109 
feet a/s), just a little farther on, are world known for their 
watch-making industry. 

Neuchatel or Neuenburg (1433 feet a/s), is a prosperous 
town charmingly situated on the lake of the same name and is 
particularly well known as an educational center, with a 
university, a commercial college and a number of private day 
and boarding schools. 

The charm of the Lake of Neuchatel lies in its wide 
expanse of pale green waters, in the uninterrupted view to 
be enjoyed, especially from the Jura side, and in the gentle 
loveliness of the vine-clad shores. 

Besides trading vessels, a whole fleet of pretty passenger 
steamers keep the traffic open on the Lake of Neuchatel as 
far as Estavayer in the south, and from Neuchatel through 
the Broye to the Lake of Mo rat. 

The Lake of Morat or Murten, as well as the Lake of 
Neuchatel have many relics of the lake-dwellers. Morat, 
with its proud old Castle (1522 feet a/s) is an ancient little 
town on the right bank of the lake named after it. It is 
dear to all the Swiss, in memory of the great battle in 
which the troops of the Confederation repulsed Charles 
the Bold of Burgundy and his army. An electric railway 
connects Morat with 

Fribourg or Freiburg (2073 feet a/s), the capital of the 
Canton of Fribourg, the ancient Uechtland. 

The palm for artistic beauty should, with little doubt, be 
awarded to this city, of which Ruskin writes: "No other 
town has so faithfully preserved its mediaeval character." 



154 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

This time-honored city was founded in 1178 by Berthold IV 
of Zahringen and occupies a rocky height almost surrounded 
by the River Sarine. Fribourg, a pronounced Roman 
Catholic center, is the seat of the Bishop of Lausanne and a 
Roman Catholic University. The city's most revered place 
of worship is the Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas, a marvel- 
ous work of Gothic art, towering above all the roofs. 

On June 8, 1182, Roger, Bishop of Lausanne, consecrated 
the first place of worship at Fribourg. A century later, in 
1283, the foundation was laid to the present edifice, of which 
the Gothic nave was completed in 1343, the handsome tower, 
with a winding staircase of 365 steps and 250 feet high, in 
1492, and the choir in 1631. In 1512 the church received the 
collegiate degree under Pope Julius II. 

The main portal represents "The Last Judgment" in a most 
impressive and dramatic scene. The lofty interior, with no 
less than twelve side chapels, distinguishes itself by its impres- 
sive spaciousness and harmony. To the right is the Chapel of 
the Holy Sepulchre, dating back to 1433. The figure of Christ, 
stretched out on the tomb, and the various emotion-filled per- 
sonages surrounding Him all cut in sandstone, form a note- 
worth}'- group. Stained glass windows from the ancient abbey 
of Hauterive, near Fribourg, decorate the choir and modern 
stained glass is seen in the nave. 

Of universal fame is undoubtedly the organ of the Fribourg 
Cathedral and those who love music must hear this wonderful 
instrument themselves, to appreciate the various effects it can 
be made to produce. Built in 1824-34 by Al. Mooser, whose 
bust has been placed to the left of the entrance, it has 74 stops 
and 7,800 pipes, some of them 32 feet in length. There may be 
more powerful organs in Europe, but none surpasses this one 
in its marvelous purity of tone. The ringing peals of praise 
that fall, refined and rarefied, from the vaulted ceiling, the 
golden, angelic arpeggios that are whispered through the 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 155 

carved stalls, or the plaintive tones of prayer that penetrate 
to the very altars of the side chapels, leave a perpetual 
echo in the human soul. 

With its university, its technical college and numerous other 
public and private educational establishments, Fribourg is one 
of the leading Swiss Roman Catholic centers of education. 

The Lac Noir, Schwarzsee (3365 feet a/s), a health resort 
situated amidst Alpine scenery 25 kilometres south o-f Fri- 
bourg, is much frequented. 

From Lyss, on the line between Berne and Bienne, a 
branch line runs via Morat up the valley of the Broye to 
Avenches (Aventicum, the capital of Roman Helvetia) with 
a beautiful mediaeval castle on a height, and then to Payerne. 
The church and Benedictine Abbey at Payerne were 
erected in the 10th Century by Queen Bertha of Swabia, 
the wife of Rudolf II. Passing Moudon, a little town with 
a noteworthy Gothic church, and the Chateaux of Carouge 
and Rochefort the branch line joins the main line from 
Berne to Lausanne at Palezieux. 

Payerne is the junction for the railway connecting Fribourg 
with the Lake of Neuchatel. The lake is reached at Esta- 
vayer, where there is a picturesque chateau dating from the 
12th and 13th Century. The line ends at Yverdon, a junction 
with the line coming from Neuchatel, which follows the much 
admired shores of the lake of this name all the way to 

Yverdon (1433 feet a/s), a watering place with hot sul- 
phur springs, renowned as very beneficial in cases of gout, 
rheumatism and arthritism. There the traveler may board a 
narrow gauge railway, which, rapidly ascending the verdant 
and well-wooded slopes of the Jura, will at the end of one 
hour bring him to 

Ste. Croix (3510 feet a/s), which, together with its neigh- 
bor Les Rasses (3950 feet a/s), is privileged as far as 
climate is concerned. In summer, the burning and oppressive 



156 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

heat of the sun is always tempered by light breezes which, 
combined with the bracing air of these altitudes, restore to 
the visitor health, strength and energy. 

Lovely walks and excursions can be made in all directions, 
along good roads or paths, through beautiful forests of fir. 

In winter the many slopes provide splendid surfaces for 
ski-ing and tobogganing and Ste. Croix as well as Les Rasses 
have in latter years gained fame as ideal winter sport centers. 

LAKE GENEVA AND THE RHONE VALLEY 

Coming from Yverdon we reach the region of Lake Leman. 
This largest lake of Switzerland is at the same time consid- 
ered to be one of the most beautiful, and as its shores have 
always been a favorite abode of the world's greatest writers 
and artists, its history and associations are truly of a classical 
nature. 

Lake Leman or Lake of Geneva, under which latter name 
this glorious expanse of water is generally known, presents in 
all seasons a picture of unique and captivating charm. During 
the summer months the dazzling sunshine sheds silvery 
streaks on the sluggish ripples which spend themselves on the 
beach. Then in the evening, when the mountains fade in the 
mist and the stars twinkle in mischievous merriment above 
the slumbering waves, when the white-sailed barques glide 
gracefully and silently hither and thither, the spectator is 
spellbound by the lake's enchanting loveliness. 

In winter, when the entire country has donned its spotless 
garments of ermine, the lake reposes like a precious sapphire 
in a jewel case lined with white, and we too feel compelled to 
echo the poet's appreciation: 

"O blue Leman, ever great, ever beautiful! 

Would that my grave at least were on thy borders!" 

To visit the different towns and villages which line the 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 157 

Swiss border of Lake Leman is like looking at a string of 
carefully matched pearls. 

Geneva (1243 feet a/s), the western gateway of Switzer- 
land, at the southern end of the glorious lake, combines 
beauty, wealth and intellect and as the seat of the League of 
Nations it surely deserves special attention. 

Geneva was occupied by a settlement long ago, but there is 
no exact record when the colony began. Caesar found here a 
town of the Allobroges that he called Geneva and he actually 
cut the bridge over the Rhone which connected it with the 
right bank of the river, in order to prevent the passage of the 
Helvetes. When Gaul was organized under Roman adminis- 
tration, Geneva was included in the province of Gallia Nar- 
bonensis. The city adopted Christianity in the 4th Century 
and quickly became the religious capital of a great diocese. 
Occupied in the 5th Century by the Burgundians, Geneva 
formed part of the first kingdom of Burgundy, and fell along 
with it, in 534, into the hands of the Franks. 

In 888 the second Burgundian kingdom, east of the Jura, 
was founded on the ruins of the Carlovingian Empire and; 
Geneva became one of its chief towns. The last king, 
Rudolf III, left his crown to the Emperor Conrad the Salic 
in the year 1032 and Geneva thus became an imperial city and 
the local government, at that time administered by a Bishop, 
was permitted to develop with considerable freedom. The 
prelate was at the same time temporal ruler of the city and 
spiritual head of a diocese partly occupied by nobles as power- 
ful as himself, and in the end even more powerful. One of 
these, the Count of Savoy, succeeded, after having destroyed 
the power of the Counts of Geneva, his rivals, in possessing 
himself of the episcopal castle and of the dignity of the 
vidoninat, or temporal function of the Church (in 1290). 

From this moment the pretended claims of the House of 
Savoy to sovereignty over Geneva took more and more the 



158 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

character of veritable encroachments. It required all the zeal 
of the citizens municipal government had been instituted at 
the close of the 13th Century to prevent the same from 
transforming themselves into possessions by force, which was 
for some centuries the principal object of the Savoyard 
princes. 

The beginning of the 16th Century was marked by the 
breaking out of the final struggle between the people of 
Geneva and the Duke of Savoy, when the citizens were 
divided into two parties, the Mamelukes, or followers of the 
House of Savoy, and the Huguenots (from Eidgenossen 
Confederates). After having seen two of its patriotic chiefs 
perish Berthelier in 1519, and Levrier in 1524 the latter 
party finally won the day. Treaties of fellow-citizenship, 
made with the various Swiss Cantons, assured to Geneva a 
security which only became definite and final after the adop- 
tion of the doctrine of the Reformation, as preached by Farel, 
in 1535. The episcopal authority was then abolished; Geneva 
became a Republic governed by syndics and councils elected 
by the people. 

On the fifth day of August, 1536, there arrived in Geneva 
the man whose name lives still in the town itself and in the 
system of theology which is called after him Jean Calvin. 
He was a native of Noyon in Picardy, who espoused the new 
religious belief and had gone to the French capital, but found 
it necessary to seek an asylum abroad. 

Calvin attached himself to the new party in Geneva and 
soon acquired immense influence in that city as well as in the 
whole of Europe. He established not only the Reformed 
Church, but also the State ; he developed public instruction, at 
that time already in a flourishing condition, founded the 
Geneva Academy which became in those days the leading 
school of Protestant theology with the gentle Beza, Calvin's 
devoted friend, as its first rector. He worked out civil and 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 159 

sumptuary laws, investing old institutions with a simplicity 
and austerity which attracted the attention and obtained the 
support of reformers in all countries. Geneva thus became the 
stronghold of the Reformed Faith and a refuge for persecuted 
Protestants of all nationalities, especially Frenchmen. The 
refugees soon assimilated themselves in their new home and 
they and their descendants have greatly contributed to the 
importance of Geneva, which was also visited by John Knox 
when he was exiled from Great Britain. 

The final emancipation of Geneva from Savoy occurred in 
the year 1602, when the army of the latter, in the night of 
December 11, in the midst of peace, treacherously strove to 
surprise the sleeping city by climbing the ramparts. This 
attempt, called "escalade," was a failure, and from that time 
on to the French Revolution Geneva was able to develop its 
own fortunes. 

Jean Jacques Rousseau, son of a watchmaker, born in 
Geneva in the year 1712, is one of Geneva's best known liter- 
ary celebrities. He disapproved of the unjust distinction then 
made between the aristocracy and the poorer classes and as 
champion of the latter he exposed his convictions in the 
"Contrat Social," which, together with his "Emile," were com- 
mitted to the flames by the public executioner. But the very 
descendants of his fierce opponents erected a statue in his 
honor on the tiny island he as an almost pious devotee to 
Nature loved so much and which is now known as Rous- 
seau's Isle. 

Rousseau gave the first impulse to modern mountain 
worship. He especially loved wild and gloomy scenes and 
tells us in his "Confessions" that he required "torrents, rocks, 
dark forest, mountains and precipices." His description of 
the retreat at Meillerie, given in the "Nouvelle Heloise," was 
especially famous and among others deeply affected Goethe, 
Byron and Shelley. 



160 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Gradually Geneva and its lake became the Mecca of leaders 
in science and literature. Voltaire, Mme. de Stael, Georges 
Sand, Dumas, Daudet and Byron, Gibbon, Dickens, Ruskin, 
Frances Havergal, Sismondi, De Saussure, Amiel a veritable 
parade of illustrious poets, novelists, essayists, philosophers 
and scientists whose intimate connections with that fair 
and intellectual city and its environs are forever interwoven 
in its history. 

After the French Revolution, Geneva was the capital of a 
French Department, but in 1815, it became the 22d Canton 
of the Swiss Confederation. Since that time, the history 
of this city, as regards its foreign polic}', has been identical 
with that of the Confederation. 

The actual founder of the Red Cross Society was Jean 
Henri Dunant, a philanthropic citizen of Geneva. On June 
14, 1859, he chanced to be present at the battle of Solferino 
and was an eye-witness to the vast amount of unnecessary 
suffering that resulted from the inability of the regular 
surgical corps for the thousands of wounded who lay upon 
the field. 

Three years later he published a book on his experiences 
and advocated an international convention to provide for 
the aiding of the wounded in war. This convention, which 
took place at Geneva and which was concluded and signed 
on August 22, 1864, neutralized the surgical corps of hostile 
armies and volunteer societies caring for the wounded. As 
a compliment to Switzerland, the Swiss flag in reversed 
colors, t. e., a red cross on a white field, was to be adopted 
universally and worn on arm bands by all members of 
the neutral staffs. 

Geneva has since that time been the headquarters of the 
International Red Cross Society, which distinguished itself 
during the World War with its gigantic activity on behalf 
of suffering mankind. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 161 

Its agency for the prisoners of war, established in the 
spacious Musee Rath, proved itself a wonderful interme- 
diary between the prisoners of war and their families and 
friends. 

Like all the Swiss cities on the route of that endless 
passage of evacues and grands blesses, the population of 
Geneva, as true Samaritans, opened their hearts and purses 
wide to those most unfortunate of all war victims; and 
that splendid charitable spirit has been manifested in undi- 
minished fervor from the very beginning until the end. And 
when in June, 1918, the American Red Cross expressed a 
desire to establish a branch in Geneva the municipal authori- 
ties of that city voted immediately that the handsome Palais 
Eynard should be placed at its disposal. 

In the year 1864 the Alabama room in the City Hall, which 
was formerly used for marriage ceremonies, was placed at 
the disposal of the First International Red Cross Conven- 
tion which was signed on August 22 of that year. In 
memory thereof a marble tablet with the following inscrip- 
tion was affixed to one of the walls: 

"In this room on August 22, 1864, was concluded and signed 
the Geneva convention for the betterment of the lot of wounded 
soldiers of armies in the field." 

A large oil painting shows the representatives of the different 
powers on the point of signing the document. 

This same room, in which the noblest sentiments of uni- 
versal charity and fraternity have been displayed, was the 
place of meeting of the famous Alabama Claims Commis- 
sion from December 15, 1871,-September 14, 1872, which on 
the occasion of the 32d conference ended the disputes 
between England and the United States after the Secession 
war. Great Britain was then obliged to pay $15,500,000 
damages in favor of the United States. 

Here was a first demonstration of the value of inter- 



162 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

national arbitrage to avoid wars and at that time already 
the two powers in question chose as their meeting place the 
City of Geneva in neutral Switzerland, where foreign influ- 
ence did not prevail. A marble tablet also commemorates 
this historic event in this chamber, which then became offi- 
cially known as the "Alabama Room." 

The revised text of the Geneva Convention was further- 
more also signed in the Alabama room. 

In the year 1876 the Universal Peace Union of Philadel- 
phia celebrated the foundation of the United States of 
America and the tenth anniversary of its own existence. 
The officers present at that meeting were overcome by a 
profound consciousness of prevailing peace and offered their 
swords to be converted into agricultural implements. One 
of the members present, Thomas Atkinson, offered ten 
dollars for the first cart which would be cast from the 
metal of these weapons. 

This cart figured first as a symbol of peace in the 1878 
Paris Exposition and was then, by a unanimous decision of 
the Universal Peace Union and through the intermediary 
of Charles Lemonnier, President of the International League 
for Peace and Freedom, offered to the city and people of 
Geneva to be placed in the "Alabama Room" and to remain 
there as a token of universal accord and peace. 

In the Alabama room we find, moreover, a small facsimile 
of the gigantic Liberty Bell, which was cast in the United 
States from the metal of swords and cannon on the occasion 
of the Hundredth Anniversary of American Independence. 
This little bell coming from the bell foundry at Baltimore 
has now taken the character of a bell of peace destined to 
announce to the whole world "Peace on earth and good- 
will among men," and it bears the inscription: 

"May this emblem of Peace engender the spirit which should 
reign over the whole world." 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 163 

Whether it be a stroll along the imposing promenades 
skirting the lake, where the distant Alpine Chain with 
Mont Blanc beckons alluringly, or whether it be through 
the old and new quarters of the city, one encounters con- 
stantly vivid proof of Geneva's dominant leadership through- 
out the ages. 

The very names of the streets, the rue Calvin, the rue 
Necker, the rue de la Croix Rouge, the rue Voltaire, the 
rue Farel, the rue Jean Jacques Rousseau, where Rousseau's 
father lived, the Grand' Rue, where Rousseau himself was 
born, are perpetual reminders of the city's glorious past. 
During the war, as a compliment to the United States of 
America, the rue d'Allemagne became the rue Wilson. 

Old Geneva prides itself of St. Peter's Cathedral, that dig- 
nified memorial to its spiritual leader Calvin. The construc- 
tion of this edifice was started in the 10th Century, on the 
site of an ancient pagan temple, and completed in the 13th 
Century. Begun at a time when the round-arched Roman- 
esque architecture was at its height, the structure was finished 
when the Gothic period had attained its full glory. The inte<- 
rior, with fine stained-glass choir windows, is of rare, digni- 
fied beauty and the magnificent Cathedral organ has for 
centuries heen the delight of all music lovers. 

In close vicinity to the Cathedral is the ancient City Hall 
with the before-mentioned historic Alabama room and oppo- 
site is the Arsenal, containing Geneva's Museum of History. 

The College St. Antoine, founded by Calvin in 1559 and 
restored in 1888, is a further testimonial to the great 
Reformer, same as the University whose history dates back 
to Calvin's Academy, also founded in 1559. The University 
has acquired world fame and the numerous public and private 
educational institutions, contributing to the industrial, intel- 
lectual and artistic phases of life, are largely frequented. 

Quite recently Geneva has been enriched by the Monument 



164 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

of the Reformation which has been planned on the most com- 
prehensive lines, so as to epitomize the history of the Refor- 
mation throughout the world, and not merely that part of it 
which took place in Geneva. 

It is a great mural monument on the Promenade des Bas- 
tions, where a remainder is left of one of the former city 
walls, bearing the inscription "Post Tenebras Lux" (Light 
after Darkness). The four figures of Calvin, Farel, Beza 
and Knox stand in alto-relievo and heroic size in the center. 
Eight panels, crowded with figures, are cut in bas-relief, with 
appropriate inscriptions. The signing of the compact in 
the cabin of the Mayflower is also pictured. This is an 
international monument and France, Germany, Switzerland, 
Scotland, Holland, England and the United States are 
represented. 

In addition to the before-indicated intimate historic and 
spiritual connections with the leading nations of the world, 
this remarkable monument forms another lasting and uni- 
versal bond of mutual appreciation and understanding. And 
last but not least Geneva as the Capital of the League of 
Nations is more than ever interesting. 

Coppet (1300 feet a/s), with its fine old castle reminds 
of Jacques Necker, a Genevese, who became finance minister 
to Louis XVI, and his brilliant daughter, Madame de Stael. 

Nyon (1322 feet a/s), so much admired by Voltaire, is a 
charming spot indeed, with ancient buildings and remark- 
able 14th Century Castle. Nearby is Prangins with its 
extensive buildings and parks where ex-Emperor Charles 
of Austria, after the war, took up his first residence in 
exile. From Nyon a railroad leads to the summer and 
winter resort of St. Cergue (3432 feet a/s). Thence an 
ascent may be made of The Dole (5595 feet a/s) the highest 
point of the Swiss Jura. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 165 

Rolle (1325 feet a/s), with the charming health resort 
Crimel (2395 feet a/s) and 

Merges (1240 feet a/s) with its interesting old chateau 
are delightfully restful spots and great favorites in the 
artists' world. The well-preserved mediaeval Castle of Vuf- 
flens, in close proximity, is well worth seeing. This ancient 
stronghold is said to have been erected by Queen Bertha of 
Swabia, wife of Rudolf II, 912-937. 

Ouchy (1246 feet a/s), where Byron composed in 1817 
his "Prisoner of Chillon" is the port of 

Lausanne (1714 feet a/s), the city where Gibbon wrote 
the last three volumes of his "Decline and Fall of the Roman 
Empire." 

Proudly seated on the lower slope of the Mount Jorat 
and crowned by its ancient cathedral and castle, the beau- 
tiful capital of Canton Vaud is as fascinating as it is pic- 
turesque with its steep streets, its high-pointed roofs and 
its fine terraces overlooking beautiful Lake Leman and the 
Savoy Alps. 

' On the Place Montbenon is the Federal Palace of Justice, 
a beautiful building in the Italian Renaissance style, site of 
the Supreme Court, the highest judicial authority in 
Switzerland. 

Lausanne has an enviable reputation, as an extremely 
healthy and pleasant residential town, enjoying a mild and 
equable winter climate. It is a suitable place of residence 
not only for the strong and healthy but also for the delicate. 

As an educational center Lausanne is equally well known. 
It possesses numerous public and private schools for both 
sexes, headed by the university, which is attended by students 
of all nationalities. 

The social amenities of Lausanne are very great and there 
are many excellent entertainments at the theatre, Kursaal, 
Casino, etc. The rendezvous of the Anglo-American colony 



166 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

is at the English and American Assembly Rooms, close fco the 
English church. Sports of every kind flourish in this fair city 
and the skating-rinks and toboggan-runs at Sauvabelin and at 
Ste. Catherine, within easy reach of the town, are scenes of 
constant animation during the season of white. 

Vevey (1263 feet a/s) has often been called the "Pearl 
of the Leman." And well it deserves that name. The vis- 
itor never tires of the magnificent panorama of mountains, 
lake and open country Which spreads before him in this 
beauteous spot. Vevey is a center for agreeable walks and 
excursions of great variety. A funicular climbs the Mont 
Pelerin (2952 feet a/s), an all-year health and pleasure 
resort. An electric line runs to the charming villages of 
the vineyard section: St. Legier (1760 feet a/s), Blonay 
(2000 feet a/s) and Chaxnby (2461 feet a/s), and a rack and 
pinion railway makes the ascent from Chamby to the 
favorite point of view of Les Pleiades (4542 feet a/s). 
Another memorable excursion can be made into the pic- 
turesque Gruyeres district, via Chatel St. Denis-Bulle- 
Gruyeres-Montboven, returning via Chexbres. 

Montreux (1310 feet a/s) with Clarens and Territet forms 
undoubtedly one of the stellar features of Lake Leman. 
Besides being endowed with an extremely mild climate 
Montreux is also known for its excellent mineral springs. The 
nearby resorts of 

Glion (2270 feet a/s) and Caux (3610 feet a/s) are con- 
veniently reached by mountain railways, same as the 
Rochers-de-Naye (6710 feet a/s), the "Rigi" of this region. 
A sojourn at Montreux would, of course, be incomplete 
without a visit to the Castle of Chillon. It has an unusu- 
ally impressive situation on an isolated rock 22 yards from the 
bank of the lake, with which it is connected by a bridge. Still 
more impressive than its stately silhouette is the carefully 
renovated interior of the castle with its gloomy dungeons. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 16f 

**Chillon! thy prison is a koly place, 

And thy sad floor an altar, for 'twas trod 

Until his very steps have left a trace, 

Worn, as if the cold pavement were a sod, 

By Bonivard! may none those marks efface, 
For they appeal from tyranny to God." 

So sang Byron in his "Prisoner of Chillon," that classic 
poem which will never die. 

Montreux is the western terminus of the Montreux-Bernese 
Oberland railway, connecting the Lake of Geneva with the 
Lake of Thun. (See page 189). 

Villeneuve, an o-ld-fashioned little town, already inhabited 
in Roman times, is the last landing place on the northern 
bank of Lake Leman. The Rhone flows into the lake three 
miles to the west, near Bouveret and the Rhone Valley, 
about one hundred miles long, extends from this district to 
the Rhone Glacier (10,450 feet a/s), from which issues the 
Rhone as a narrow stream. The first important community 
in the Rhone Valley is 

Aigle (1375 feet a/s), an attractive town with a spacious 
chateau. A carriage road leads to 

Corbeyricr (3280 feet a/s), and an electric railway to 

Leysin (4150 feet a/s), the latter one of Switzerland's 
most beneficial summer and winter health resorts. Another 
railroad ascends to the all-year resort of 

Lrcs Diablerets (3815 feet a/s), whence we may cross the 
Col de Pillon on foot or by diligence to Gsteig and Gstaad. 
(See page 190.) 

An electric railroad runs also from Aigle by way of 
Ollon to Monthey (1380 feet a/s), and into the Val d'llliez, 
one of the most exquisite Swiss Alpine valleys, with 
Champ^ry (3423 feet a/s) as the terminus. 

Morgins (4405 feet a/s), a watering-place with chalybeate 
springs, can be reached by diligence from Troistorrents 



168 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

station of the Month ey- Champ ery line and has, like Champery, 
become a winter sport center as well. 

Continuing along the main line, the next spot which 
deserves attention is 

Bex-les-Bains (1427 feet a/s), situated at the foot of the 
Dent du Midi (10,450 feet a/s), a watering place and climatic 
resort of increasing importance. In fall it is much frequented 
for the "grape cure." An electric railway connects with the trio 

Gryon (3716 feet a/s), Villars (4120 feet a/s) and 
Chesieres (3970 feet a/s), favorite resorts in summer 
and winter. A climb to the Grand Muveran (10,043 feet a/s) 
from Les Plans (3612 feet a/s), a summer and winter resort, 
is relatively easy. A little further on is 

St. Maurice (1377 feet a/s), one of the most historical 
places in the Valais. It was already a fortress in the days 
of Julius Caesar. Its abbey was endowed by many kings, 
emperors and potentates, some of Charlemagne's gifts to 
it being still preserved in the treasury. One mile and a half 
above St. Maurice are the much frequented 

Baths of Lavey (1377 feet a/s). 

Martigny (1564 feet a/s), is the starting point of the 
scenic Martigny-Chatelard railway connecting Switzerland 
with Chamonix and the Mont Blanc region. 

Leaving Martigny the railway proceeds to Vernayaz at 
the entrance of the Gorges du Trient. Immediately after 
this station starts the only cog-wheel section of the line, 
and with a maximum gradient of 20 per cent, it climbs the 
rocky cliffs towering above Vernayaz, now directly below. 
A wonderful and ever-extending panorama is unfolded 
before the eyes of the traveler as the train mounts, and 
after a short climb, which distinguishes itself by many 
technical features, we reach Salvan (3230 feet a/s), a 
popular summer resort. 

Still ascending in curves through verdant pastures with 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 169 

weather-beaten chalets clustering in the midst of them, the 
train reaches the charmingly situated summer station of 
Les Marecottes and continues its way over the precipitous 
hill slopes commanding the Gorges du Trient, until it 
arrives at Finhaut (4025 feet a/s), a picturesque village 
which commands a unique situation opposite the Glacier du 
Trient. 

From here the line descends gradually to Chatelard and 
then proceeds to Vallorcine station, on the Franco-Swiss 
frontier, where passengers change from the carriages of the 
Martigny-Chatelard Railway to those of the Paris-Lyon- 
Mediterranean Railway, which latter line conveys them to 
Chamonix (Mont Blanc region). 

From Martigny another railway leads to Sembrancher 
(2330 feet a/s), and Orsieres (2894 feet a/s), connecting 
here with the postal auto-bus service to the Great St. Bernard 
Hospice (8110 feet a/s). From the Hospice the road leads 
to Aosta (Italy). 

The Great St. Bernard Pass is one of the best known 
highways in the Alps. A temple of Jupiter stood in Roman 
times, not far from the summit of the pass. In connection 
with this place of worship the Romans also built a shelter for 
the benefit of the Imperial messengers and soldiers. Christian 
rulers transformed the same later on into a regular Hospice, 
an inn for the accommodation of wayfarers, but it was 
destroyed in the 9th Century. 

Later on, a wise and saintly priest of Aosta, Bernard de 
Menthon, erected a new Hospice on the summit of the pass, 
on the border of a sombre little lake. This new foundation 
grew rapidly, and although it had to undergo numerous 
trials several times it was destroyed by fire it constantly 
gained in importance. 

The Hospice itself is a plain gray structure with small win- 
dows and massive walls which have been especially strength- 



170 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

ened to resist the furious storms which are common in this 
isolated region. The interior of the Hospice is simple and 
comfortable. It has accommodation for about 300 persons 
and it is calculated that an average of 30,000 people enjoy the 
hospitality of the monks every year. 

The majority of the visitors in these days are tourists during 
the summer season, but there are still a certain number of 
poor travelers, chiefly Italians, who cannot afford the railroad 
fare to reach Switzerland by this modern means of transporta- 
tion, but who are obliged to cross the pass on foot. Rich and 
poor are received alike at the Hospice ; no name is asked and 
no payment is demanded from anyone. However, mere tour- 
ists are expected to deposit an amount at least equal to what 
they would have paid for the same accommodation in a 
mountain hotel. 

The monks who live and work at the Hospice, which is also 
famous for its very beautiful church and valuable library, are 
canons of the Order of St. Augustine. Most of them are 
splendid specimens of manhood, but the hard climate of this 
region is too great a strain for the strongest of them. Eight 
or nine months in an isolated, snow-bound country, at an alti- 
tude of 8110 feet a/s, combined with the constant dangers 
connected with their heroic rescuing work, wears these brave 
men out and it has therefore been found necessary that they 
should be relieved at regular intervals. For this reason there 
exists a constant interchange of men between the headquarters 
of the order stationed at Martigny and the Hospice of the 
Great St. Bernard and the one on the Simplon Pass. 

Life is very strict and simple at the Hospice, and the 
original purpose of the foundation, to save poor wayfarers, 
when the same have lost their way in a blinding snowstorm, 
is still fulfilled to the letter. For this rescue work the monks 
have some 20 wonderful assistants not human beings, but 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 171 

dogs, animals which are famous throughout the world and 
known as St. Bernard dogs. 

From the time the dogs are little more than puppies, they 
are gradually trained for the great work of life-saving for 
which they are destined. It is reckoned that it generally 
requires two years to teach a dog all he must know, before he 
can be trusted out alone as a seeker and guide, and even then 
his training is not stopped. The dogs are taught to find the 
wanderers lost or buried in the snow ; they are instructed to 
bark when they have discovered someone and to wake up those 
whom they find asleep. If the person thus discovered has the 
strength to walk, the dog conducts him to the Hospice, but if 
he is not equal to such an exertion, the dog will drag him for 
a certain distance and then bark for further assistance. 

During the winter 'months when the temperature is far, 
below zero, the snow is piled as high as 12 to 15 feet Blind- 
ing snowstorms are frequent during that season and it is just 
in such days of peril that the monks and their dogs have to 
work hardest of all. 

A telephone connection was established between the 
Hospice and the nearest villages on both sides of the pass 
a few years ago, and the monks are now informed in advance 
of the number of travelers bound for the Hospice. This, of 
course, facilitates the rescue work. The dogs are so cleverly 
trained that it is only necessary to indicate to them the direc- 
tion and they will start off alone to meet the arrivals and to 
lead them to the Hospice. 

Champex (4821 feet a/s), a romantic summer resort with 
a lake, is reached from Orsieres; and Chables, Lourtier, 
Fionnay and Mauvoisin, all interesting villages in the 
beautiful Valley de Baynes, are reached from Sembrancher. 

The journey further up the Rhone offers many inspiring 
sights, 

Sion or Sittcn (1710 feet a/s), capital of the Canton of 



172 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Valais and an episcopal see, with its two castles on iso- 
lated hills, looks very picturesque. On the higher hill are 
the ruins of the Castle of Tourbillon, erected in 1294 and 
destroyed by fire in 1788, and on the lower hill to the right 
stands the old Castle of Valeria with the beautifully 
restored Church of Notre Dame de Valere, dating back to 
the 10th Century. In the town itself beckon the Gothic 
Cathedral with a tower from the 9th Century, and the 
Church of St. Theodule. From Sion we may pass into the 
Val d'Herens, with Mayens de Sion (4267 feet a/s), a 
favorite summer resort, and Evolene (4520 feet a/s), 
Les Hauderes (4747 feet a/s) and Arolla (6572 feet a/s), 
a trio of Alpine resorts whose somewhat secluded position 
has endeared them to all lovers of rural Alpine beauty. 

Sicrre or Siders (1765 feet a/s) is the next important 
place on the main line and the starting point of the 
funicular railway climbing up to the well-known all-year 
resort of Montana-Vermala (5120 feet a/s), with a 
renowned 18-hole golf course. South of Sierre open the 
Val d'Anniviers with Vissoye (4000 feet a/s), St Luc 
(5495 feet a/s), Chandolin (6350 feet a/s), Grimence and 
Zinal (5505 feet a/s), a veritable galaxy of Alpine villages, 
which form part of the "climbers' paradise." 

Leuk (2470 feet a/s) is the starting point of a little rail- 
way leading up to the much visited Baths of Leuk (4628 
feet a/s), which have in recent years also been open in 
winter for every variety of snow and ice sports. From, 
here a bridle parth, easy and interesting, leads over the 
Gemmi Pass seven hours' walk to Kandersteg (see page 
189) in the Bernese Oberland. South of Leuk, a bridle 
path leads to the summer resort of Gruben-Meiden in the 
Turtmann Valley. 

Viege or Visp (2155 feet a/s) is the starting point for 
Stalden (2736 feet a/s), a beautifully situated village at the 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 173 

entrance of the Valley of Saas, whence a remarkably fine 
road leads to Saas-Fee (5900 feet a/s), one of Switzerland's 
most celebrated Alpine health resorts and starting point for 
numerous high Alpine tours for experienced mountaineers. 
The "Dom," 14,940 feet a/s, is the most formidable summit in 
this district 

From Stalden the train crosses boldly constructed bridges 
and ascends through scenery of striking grandeur, to 

St. Niklaus (3708 feet a/s), a favorite of those in search 
of a restful spot. The line then follows the romantic 
course of the River Visp, and still ascending, passes the 
picturesque resorts of Randa and Tasch, both centers for 
excursions into the high Alps. 

Once more the train crosses the turbulent mountain 
stream, for a brief moment the mountains draw closer, and 
then comes a burst of light, a radiant expanse of velvety 
pastures, with a group of nutbrown chalets and comfortable 
hotels, a mountain silhouetted like a pyramid of marble against 
the deep blue sky Zermatt and the Matterhorn. 

Zermatt (5315 feet a/s) has become one of the most 
popular haunts of travelers in quest of sublime, unspoiled 
Alpine scenery. In the morning when the Matterhorn (14,782 
feet a/s) glistens in fairy-like splendor hardly a tourist can 
resist the lure of an excursion to the Gornergrat. In one and 
a half hours the railroad climbs to an altitude of 10,289 feet 
into the realm of eternal ice and snow. Glaciers are below 
and around, and in the distance on both sides of the Matter- 
horn one beholds many of the noblest peaks of the Alps, such 
as the Monte Rosa (15,217 feet), Lyskamm (14,889 feet a/s), 
and Breithorn (13,380 feet a/s) on the left, and the Dent 
Blanche (14,318 feet a/s), Zinal Rothorn (13,856 feet a/s), 
Weisshorn (14,804 feet a/s), and the Mischabels (14,982 feet 
a/s) on the right. These mountains form the classic high 
Alpine tours from Zermatt. 



174 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Another favorite excursion for the average tourist is a 
walking tour to the tiny pilgrimage chapel of Maria zum 
Schnee on the solitary Schwarzsee, 8393 feet a/s. The pious 
natives flock to this spot every Sunday during the summer 
(weather permitting) to attend mass. 

From Zermatt the St. Theodule Pass (10,900 feet a/s), 
offering magnificent views of this grandiose Alpine realm, 
leads to Le Breuil in Italy. While this tour is not of great 
difficulty, it will nevertheless be wise to hire a guide. 

Returning back to the Rhone Valley 

Brig (2244 feet a/s), a delightfully old-fashioned town, is 
presently reached. Its shining metal cupolas give the town a 
somewhat oriental character. Among the noteworthy sights 
of Brig is the picturesque old chateau of the Stockalper 
family, with square towers, large courtyard and wide arch- 
ways. This formidable residence was built in 1642 by Kaspar 
Stockalper, a wealthy and influential man, who in those days 
dominated the trade over the Simplon, protecting the road 
with 70 guardsmen. 

In modern times Brig has gained importance as a railroad 
junction. It is the northern portal of the Simplon tunnel 
(12 miles., 537 yards long) and the famous Lotschberg 
(tunnel is 9 miles) line from Berne and the Bernese Ober- 
land (see page 188) connects at this point with the Simplon 
trains. 

The Simplon road over the pass (6591 feet a/s) is still 
much used as an entrance to Italy, even since the tunnel 
has been made, on account of the splendid views to be had 
en route; it passes the mountain village of Berisal (5006 
feet a/s), the Simplon Hospice and the village of Simplon 
or Simpcln (4855 feet a/s), which is much frequented in 
summer. Postal auto-bus service is maintained over the 
Pass. North of Brig lies Bclalp (7009 feet a/s) a wonder- 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 175 

ful excursion point for those who like to have a close view 
of the glacier world. 

Ascending from Brig by the Furka Railway to the Rhone 
Glacier, we pass many delightful villages, which on account 
of their scenic heauty, their endearing simplicity and their 
splendid Alpine climate have become regular summer resorts: 

Morel (2525 feet a/s), the starting point for Riederalp 
(6315 feet a/s), an interesting Alpine excursion requiring 
about 3*/2 hours for the ascent, is reached after a brief 
twenty minutes ride. It is a typical mountain village with an 
attractive church and weather-beaten chalets whose sombre 
color is relieved by the brilliant red of fuchsias, geraniums 
and carnations which bloom on every window-ledge. The 
River Rhone has already assumed all the characteristics of a 
rushing glacier torrent. A little higher up it receives the 
tempestuous Binna, which rushes down through a solitary 
vale of the same name, and from now on up to Gletsch the 
district is known as the Goms valley. 

The inhabitants of this section are of the sturdy peasant 
type, conservative and obstinate in the highest degree. In the 
history of their canton they played an important role during 
the time of the Reformation and again in 1799, when their 
natural seclusion enabled them to ward off the French 
invasion. Cardinal Matthew Schinner, the famous Count- 
Bishop of Sion, was born in this district. His boyhood was 
spent in great poverty, but he struggled bravely against all 
difficulties and succeeded to educate himself for the church. 

Visitors to the Rhone Valley are generally interested in the 
remarkable water conduits, or "hisses," as they are called by 
the natives, which are found in nearly every side-valley, and 
by which water is conveyed from a considerable distance to 
the villages and pastures. By means of these irrigation chan- 
nels the fields are kept green even in the hottest summer 
weather. The ceaseless care and even peril which their con- 



176 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

struction and repair entail have been most graphically 
described by the famous Swiss writer, J. C. Heer, in his book, 
"By the Sacred Springs." 

'Delightful woods fringe the extensive pastures which are 
covered with soft, velvety grass on which Nature has lav- 
ishly strewn the prettiest of Alpine blossoms. But the natives 
of Goms have no time for sentimental flower study, and men, 
women and children toil hard in summer to gather their not 
overabundant crop of hay. The dairy and cheese industries 
are cultivated with great care and certain varieties of Goms 
cheese are hailed as a special delicacy by connoisseurs. In 
the Binnen and Fiescher valleys two small side-valleys in 
this district it used to be the custom to keep cheeses of this 
kind for many years as a sort of family heirloom. Specimens 
of them., some dating back to the 17th Century, are still shown 
in the City Hall of 

Fiesch (3515 feet a/s). This little village is the starting 
point for the well-known summer hotel Jungfrau-Eggishorn 
(7195 feet a/s). The summit of the mountain may be 
reached from here in about 2^ hours. This is also a good 
starting point for a visit to the famous Mar j el en Lake (7710 
feet a/s) and the Aletsch Glacier. 

One of the most beautiful glacier walks can now be 
enjoyed over this greatest of Europe's glaciers to the Jung- 
fraujoch. (See page 186.) The tour from the Eggishorn 
Hotel is generally interrupted at the Concordia Inn en 
route; the first section of the trip requires about five hours, 
and the walk from the Concordia to the Jungfraujoch takes 
another three hours. These tours should, of course, be 
made with a guide. 

A delightful excursion of an hour's duration may also be 
made from here to the Fiesch Glacier, and another even 
shorter walk, leads to the curious village of Ernen. 

Gletsch (5750 feet a/s) is, as its name implies, in close 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 177 

vicinity to the glacier of the Rhone, in fact the terminal face 
of this majestic, awe-inspiring ice-cascade is half an hour's 
walk from the railway station, the path following the milky 
stream all along, right up to its fairy-like cradle, hewn in the 
purest of crystal. 

From Gletsch we can reach the Bernese Oberland via the 
Grimsel Pass leading to Meiringen, either tramping (about 
S^2 hours) or per post auto-bus, or else, we may proceed via 
the Furka Pass per post auto-bus to Andermatt continue 
from here by post auto-bus to Disentis in the Grisons (page 
219) or branch off at Andermatt for Goeschenen (page 198) 
and connect with the Gothard route for Lucerne (page 191) 
or the Swiss-Italian lake district (page 220). 

BERNE AND THE BERNESE OBERLAND 

Berne (1765 feet a/s), capital of Switzerland and seat of 
the Government since 1848 is, of all important Swiss cities, 
the one which has most carefully preserved its Old World 
charm. The city was founded by Duke Berthold V of 
Zahringen in 1191. The old part, which occupies a rocky 
peninsula formed by the River Aar, winding its way a hun- 
dred feet below, has carefully preserved its attractive 
mediaeval features, and bridges, towers and gates are main- 
tained in excellent condition. In the middle of the streets, 
which are flanked with numerous arcades ("Lauben"), are 
the many handsome fountains, mostly dating from the 16th 
Century, and recently restored in their original gay colors. 
These fountain figures, which are mainly emblems of the 
various trade corporations, or guilds, are the most precious 
remainders of renaissance art in Berne. Strolling along the 
chief artery of the town, the Spitalgasse, Marktgasse, Kram- 
gasse and Gerechtigkeitsgasse, we perceive first of all the 
comical Bagpiper fountain, put up by the fraternity of that 
joyous profession, which also included the wandering 



178 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

musicians. The statue represents a handsome young man 
blowing the ancient instrument of his guild ; a monkey behind 
his back seconds him in his performance and a goose at his 
feet plays the attentive listener. His garb is typical of the 
unconcerned life of wandering minstrels. His shoes permit of 
an ample display of the toes and the only bright feature of 
his upper garments are the gilt fringes which adorn it. 

Two interesting fountains stand in the adjoining Markt- 
gasse. One statue commemorates Mrs. Anna Seiler, the 
founder of the Seiler Hospital which, in later years, developed 
into the now famous Insel Hospital. The figure shows a 
graceful, handsomely dressed woman pouring water into a 
basin. The other statue, which was erected by the fraternity 
of the sharpshooters, right in front of their guild house, 
represents a warrior in uniform, ready to take part in some 
friendly military tournament. In his right hand he is hold- 
ing the banner of the sharpshooters and a small bear seated 
at his feet points his rifle in a protectory manner toward the 
entrance door of the guild house. 

Further on is the Zahringer fountain, erected by the city in 
honor of Berthold V of Zahringen, the founder of Berne, 
The figure consists of a bear in full armor, carrying the 
banner and coat-of-arms of the house of Zahringen a 
golden lion on a red background. A cub nestles comfortably 
at his feet and feeling perfectly safe in such protection, it 
gracefully devours some grapes. 

A visitor to the Kramgasse will, of course, not overlook the 
ancient Clock Tower with its famous astronomical clock. 
Here again, as everywhere in Berne, friend Bruin plays a most 
prominent role, and the chronicles referring to the complicated 
mechanism of the clock state that : 

"As often as the hour strikes a troop of little bears go 
round in a circle, a cock crows three times before and once 
after the clock strikes. A sitting man, holding a staff in one 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 179 

hand and an hour-glass in the other, counts the strokes by 
opening his mouth and smiting with his stick at every stroke 
of the clock. Another wooden manniken rings two little bells 
when the hour is about to strike. In the belfry at the top of 
the tower are the bells, and beside them stands a figure of 
the Duke of Zahringen in armour, who strikes the hours on 
the bells with his sceptre (as this was too feeble it was 
replaced by a hammer)." 

The Clock Tower, this oldest of Berne's ancient gateways, 
dates from the 15th Century, and together with the pretty 
oriel windows of the adjoining houses and the stately Zah- 
ringer fountain close by, it makes a picture of rare charm. 

From the Kramgasse we emerge into the Gerechtigkeits- 
gasse, in the middle of which we perceive the fountain of the 
same name, *. e., the Fountain of Justice. The statue shows 
a blindfolded woman with a pair of scales in her left hand. 
At her feet are four small figures, Pope, King, Sultan and 
Burghermaster, the representatives of the different kinds of 
state legislation. All listen earnestly, and with closed eyes to 
Justice, admitting her sovereignty in each and every land. 

The most curious of Berne's fountains is, however, the 
Ogre fountain on the Kornhausplatz, representing a Jew in 
the act of devouring a child, while several other infants are 
held in readiness in his pockets. The sight of this statue has 
still an awe-inspiring effect on all the youngsters, and the 
name of it alone frequently suffices to change a naughty 
behavior into a docile one. The figure is said to have been 
erected in memory of a little boy believed to have been 
murdered by the Jews. 

At the lower end of the town, beyond the Nydeck Bridge, 
there is the bear pit, a pet possession of the Swiss Capital. 
The bear, as the heraldic animal of the city, has always been 
held in high honor, and specimens of the real live Bruin have 
been maintained by the city for over 400 years. 



180 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Of special attraction are, also, the noble Gothic structure 
of the Cathedral of St. Vincent, commenced in the year 1421 
and completed in 1896. The numerous public buildings in 
Berne and the imposing monuments betray the artistic and 
refined taste of the citizens. The Federal Palace, an edifice 
in Florentine renaissance style, the Rathaus, exquisitely pre- 
served from the Middle Ages, the University, an inspiringly 
noble temple of education, the various museums, etc., all are 
buildings of rare beauty and interest. 

For a longer sojourn Berne is ideal for, besides the attrac- 
tions the city itself provides the picturesque environs offer 
endless opportunities for delightful excursions. Nearby 

Gurtenkulm (2600 feet a/s), a much frequented health 
resort, is reached by trolley car and an electric cable railway, 
and the famous 

Baths of Gurnigel (3788 feet a/s) can be conveniently 
visited by way of Thurnen or direct from the city by regular 
automobile service. 

A side trip to the Emmenthal of cheese fame with 
the opulent villages of Langnau, Liizelfliih, Sumiswald, 
Griinen and Huttwil and return via Burgdorf is to be 
recommended. 

Thun (1844 feet a/s). This picturesque town is charm- 
ingly situated on the lake of the same name, at the outflow 
of the rapid River Aar. With its quaint streets and mediaeval 
architecture, its proud old castle Zahringen-Kyburg, erected 
1182, towering above, Thun is indeed a fitting portal to the 
Bernese Oberland. 

The town offers a vast variety of fascinating walks and 
promenades of which the most interesting are the Schwabis 
promenade, skirting the Aar, and the Bachimatt promenade, 
lined with some splendid specimens of old trees, along the 
right bank of the Aar and the lake. A magnificent panorama 
of this enchanting spot, with its turquoise lake reposing in a 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 181 

rare setting of dazzling mountains may be enjoyed from the 
pavilion of the Jakobshiibeli. As the immediate guardians of 
Thun the spectator beholds the Stockhorn chain and the 
pyramid cf the Niesen, rising from the lake above; a little 
further away glitter the immense snowfields of the immaculate 
Bliimlisalp and somewhat more distant yet, beckon, in all 
their glory the Eiger, Monch and Jungf rau. 

Thun, owing to its sheltered position, has an ideal climate 
and is a pronounced favorite among vacationists. 

From Thun, one may proceed by rail to Spiez and Inter- 
laken or from the lake station Scherzligen by boat on the 
Lake of Thun, which is numbered as one of the loveliest in 
Switzerland. We pass in succession on the right bank 
Hilterfingen, Oberhofen, Gunten, Merligen, and Beatenbucht 
with the Beatus caves, worthy of a visit. An electric cable 
railway climbs to Beatenberg (3766 feet a/s) a favorite 
summer resort and winter station. On the left bank nestles 
charmingly 

Spiez (1977 feet a/s), a flourishing summer resort. 

From Spiez three routes are open: 

Via Erlenbach-Zweisimmen to the Lake of Geneva (see 
page 189), or to Interlaken, and the other via the gigantic 
electric railway of normal gauge traction, the Lotschberg 
line, to Brig (see page 188). 

Interlaken (1863 feet a/s) is the gay tourist metropolis 
of the Bernese Oberland. It lies in a smiling, blossoming 
valley, between the beautiful lakes of Thun and Brienz, at 
the portal of some of the grandest mountain scenery in Europe, 
for in the background towers in all her overwhelming radiance 
the queen of the Bernese Alps the Jungfrau. 

The Kursaal on the Hoheweg, with its auditorium accom- 
modating several thousand persons, is a scene of constant 
animation and brilliant social life during the season. 

Mountain railways ascend, of course, all the well known 



182 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

points of view in the vicinity. There are for instance the 
delightful half-day and day excursions to the Harder (3988 
feet a/s), the Heimwehfluh (2218 feet a/s), the Schynige Platte 
(6463 feet a/s), Miirren (5385 feet a/s) via Lauterbrunnen, 
Grindelwald (3468 feet a/s), and most famous of all, the memo- 
rable circular tour Interlaken-Lauterbrunnen-Wengernalp- 
Saheidegg-Jungfraujoch-Scheidegg-Grindelwald-Interlaken. 
From Interlaken the so-called Bernese Oberland Railway 
takes us through a pleasant orchard country to Wilderswil, 
a delightful summer resort of diminutive size which is the 
starting point for the Schynige Platte, one of the most 
celebrated natural observatories of this region. A milky 
glacier stream flows with youthful buoyancy at our feet 
and sombre stretches of forests accompany us, past luxuri- 
antly green meadows on which the dearest little chalets 
are dotted in bewitching fashion. At Zweiliitschinen (2150 
feet a/s), so-called because it is the junction of the Black 
and White Liitschine, the former descending from Grindel- 
wald, the latter from the Lauterbrunnen valley, the railway 
branches off in both directions and the travelers separate 
according to their plans. Choosing the White Liitschine 
as our guide, we now proceed into the poetic valley of 
Lauterbrunnen. As we advance and notice on all sides the 
waterfalls leaping from the cliffs, we understand why this 
district was given the name "Nothing but Springs." The 
valley itself is extremely narrow, but of wondrous beauty, 
and as the train approaches the village of Lauterbrunnen 
(2615 feet a/s) itself, there is hardly a passenger who attempts 
to conceal his excitement, for there, in all its overwhelming 
beauty is the Fall of the world-renowned Staubbach, which 
throws itself from, a perpendicular precipice, one thousand 
feet high, into the valley below. A glittering silver ribbon 
at first it swiftly disperses into a filmy cloud of spray in which, 
as if by magic, is now reflected a rainbow in a bewildering 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 181 

riot of colors. The Triimmelbach and Schmadribach are two 
other magnificent cascades. 

Lauterbrunnen is the terminal station of this branch of the 
Bernese Oberland line and the starting point of the Wen- 
gernalp Railway. 

Miirren (5385 feet a/s) a delightful summer and winter 
sport station is reached from here by cable railway. 

Proceeding by the Wengernalp railway we pass 

Wengen (4243 feet a/s), a prosperous village in the 
midst of luxuriant pastures, a favorite summer and winter 
sport center. 

Wengernalp (6184 feet a/s) and Kleine Scheidegg (6770 
feet a/s) where the traveler becomes more and more 
enthusiastic and delighted with the glorious Alpine scenery 
spread before him. He is in a realm of pastures strewn with 
blossoms of every hue, with herds of well-kept cattle grazing 
in happy contentment, to the tuneful tinkling of their bells, 
and the background of this idyll is formed by the Eiger 
(13,042 feet a/s), the Monch (13,465 feet a/s) and the Tung- 
frau (13,670 feet a/s), that ever admired trio of the Bernese 
Alps. 

At Scheidegg we board the luxuriously appointed cars of 
the Jungfrau railway, which will carry us from an altitude 
of 6770 feet a/s to a height of 11,480 feet a/s. Through ver- 
dant pastures the train begins to climb noiselessly uphill, 
while the spacious plate-glass windows afford an unob- 
structed view of the surroundings. Presently we reach 

Eigergletscher (7624 feet a/s), the first station of the 
Jungfrau railway, where a regular little colony has settled 
down since the construction of the line. An excellent restau- 
rant caters to tourists and the director of the railway with 
his family and some 170 employees live in various com- 
fortable dwellings within a few feet of one of Switzerland's 
wondrous glaciers the Eigerglacier. 



184 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

The engineers and workmen employed in the construc- 
tion and maintenance of the Jungfrau railway live here all 
the year round. Cooking and baking is done by electricity, 
and the necessary water supply between November and 
May has likewise to be produced by electrically melting ice 
and snow. As the Jungfrau railway now also maintains a 
reduced traffic during the winter-sport season, the colony 
at Eigergletscher has practically become a resident popula- 
tion of those snow-bound regions. 

From this point the Eiger Glacier is easily accessible to 
good walkers, and those make it naturally a point of visiting 
the celebrated ice grotto first of all. It is said that these 
grottos are a much more accurate weather forecaster than 
the average weather bureau. If their ice is a clear, turquoise 
blue or a dark sapphire shade the weather will be fair next 
day, but if it shows a dull green color, snow may surely be 
expected and probably rain in the valley. The Eiger glacier 
grotto is about 86 feet long and 4 feet wide. The roof is 
arched and about 7 or 8 feet high in the center. The 
glacier at this point is said to be a solid mass of ice 150 feet 
thick. 

Leaving Eigergletscher Station the train enters the big, 
brilliantly lighted tunnel cut into the colossal bodies of the 
Eiger and Monch. After a scarcely perceptible climb lasting 
17 minutes we make the first stop at Eigerwand Station, 
9410 feet a/s, a spacious room hewn out of the mountain 
with natural rock pillars supporting its ceiling. Three large 
windows on the north side afford a magnificent view of the 
lower peaks beyond which the distant ranges of the Jura, 
the Vosges and the Black Forest become visible. Grindel- 
wald, in the valley below, appears like a toy village, indi- 
cating the lofty altitude which we have already reached. 

From Eigerwand the tunnel winds round to the south side 
of the Eiger and within a brief 10 minutes we reach Eismeer 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 185 

Station, 10,370 feet a/s, a veritable masterpiece of technical 
skill. It is also entirely cut out of solid rock, and contains 
a wonderful restaurant for 200 people, an electric kitchen 
and a real postomce. The restaurant, to continue with the 
description of these material attractions, is as handsome 
and comfortable a dining-room as one finds them in good 
American hotels, and the products of the adjoining spotless 
kitchen have from the beginning enjoyed a most enviable 
reputation. The tiny postoffice distinguishes itself by its 
enormous sale of picture post cards and postage stamps, and 
it would require someone familiar with high figures to esti- 
mate the legions of post-card greetings which it has already 
dispatched. From the main portion of the station rock win- 
dows, similar to the apertures on the Axenstrasse along the 
Lake of Lucerne, open out on the mountainside, temporary 
balconies being erected outside which can be taken m and 
stored, away during winter. Below and directly in front of 
the station, with a flight of steps leading down to it, lies the 
Grindelwaldfiescherfirn, a glacier with deep crevices and fis- 
sures, extending over several miles until it joins the Grindel- 
waldglacier in the "lower Eismeer." 

Emerging from the semi-darkness of the tunnel we find 
the views offered by those rock stations doubly striking and 
imposing. Eismeer, as its name implies, is in truth a sea 
of ice. So-called seracs, rocks of ice of fantastic form, 
tower one above the other, and between, sometimes hidden 
with a light cover of snow, are the treacherous crevices whose 
location is only known to the experienced guides. While the 
outlook from Eigerwand is on mountains of moderate height, 
the view from Eismeer embraces a region where ice and 
snow reign absolute a contrast unique in its kind which 
never fails to fascinate the tourists. 

In another, still more handsomely appointed train, we 
start on the last section of our trip, to Jungfraujoch, 



186 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

(11,480 feet a/s), requiring 15 minutes. The line leaves 
Eismeer in a straight line westward. First comes an adhe- 
sion section 1% miles in length, with a gradient of 6.6 per 
cent, changing to the cogwheel system with 25 per cent 
gradient shortly before Jungfraujoch is reached. 

While every stopping point of the Jungfrau railway has 
a distinctive surprise in store for the wondering traveler, 
Jungfraujoch, the present terminal, certainly forms the 
crowning glory of the whole enterprise. It is situated in 
the glaciated ridge between the Jungfrau and the Monch. 
Flanked by these two great peaks, the station affords a com- 
bination of the advantages of the lower stations in the 
glorious panorama visible from here. To the north are 
seen the verdant central Alps and extensive plains; to the 
south, Europe's greatest glacier, the Aletsch glacier, 15 miles 
in length, framed by countless pinnacles of rock and ice. An 
excellent telescope permits of a closer view of this gigantic 
"frozen river" and enables us to gaze at the Concordia Hut 
and the celebrated Marjelen Lake at the foot of the glacier. 
A narrow gallery leads us to the vast snow plateau of the 
Jungfraujoch which has become a regular playground for 
its visitors. Here in these lofty regions which are bathed 
in glorious sunshine we can enjoy ski-ing and sleigh riding 
(the sleighs being drawn by specially trained Polar dogs) 
in the middle of summer! Jungfraujoch, this unique all-year 
playground for lovers of snow sports, is also an advantageous 
starting point for glacier excursions and mountain ascents 
in the Jungfrau-Finsteraarhorn section. From here the 
summit of the Jungfrau may be reached within three to four 
hours, but guides are, of course, always essential for expedi- 
tions in this region. 

Jungfraujoch has an attractive restaurant, sleeping quar- 
ters for about 30 persons and a post and telegraph office. It 
is at present the highest railway station in Europe. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 187 

We now return to Scheidegg Station and Interlaken by 
way of 

Grindelwald (3468 feet a/s), called the glacier village and 
pioneer place of winter-sports in the Bernese Oberland. It 
owes its reputation to the exceptional situation it enjoys in 
the heart of this Alpine region, offering a great variety of 
easy excursions as well as fascinating and difficult tours for 
the experienced climber. 

An ingeniously conceived aerial cable line carries tourists 
to the Gleckstein Hotel (7670 feet a/s) on the Wetterhorn 
(11,873 feet a/s). One of the most delightful walking 
excursions is from Grindelwald over the Great Scheidegg 
via the Baths of Rosenlaui (4363 feet a/s) to Meiringen. 

Proceeding from Interlaken by boat we reach 

Brienz (1873 feet a/s). The charming little capital of 
woodcarvers, where the finest products of this art can be 
viewed and purchased, is well worth a visit. 

Meiringen (1960 feet a/s) has long been a favorite tour- 
ist resort for it is one of the loveliest villages in the Bernese 
Oberland, combining unusual scenic beauty with an altogether 
charming style of architecture. Here are the silvery cascades 
of the Alpbach and the Reichenbach which, in their won- 
derful illumination at night make a picture of unforgetable, 
fairy-like splendor. It was at the Reichenbach Falls, as 
readers of Conan Doyle will remember, that Sherlock Holmes 
was supposed to have disappeared from this mundane sphere 
of existence, and from where he was brought back to fur- 
nish fresh tales of marvel to his admirers. The grandiose 
gorge of the River Aar, which forms the chief attraction 
of Meiringen, must be visited by all means. 

From Meiringen the railway leads via the Briinig Pass to 
Lucerne (page 199), and the Post road over the Grimsel 
Pass to Gletsch (page 176). A bridle path connects via 
the Joch Pass with Engelberg (page 197), and via the 



188 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Susten Pass with Wassen on the Gothard line (page 198). 
The scenic Great Scheidegg Pass leads from here to Grindel- 
wald (see page 187). Carriages may be hired to the Baths 
of Rosenlani, a drive of two hours, and the remainder of the 
tour is made on foot in about five hours. A guide is not 
necessary. 

FROM THE LAKE OF THUN VIA THE LOTSCHBERG. 

Traveling from Spiez via the electric railway of 
normal gauge traction the Lotschberg line (tunnel is 9 miles 
long) which was opened in 1913, we encounter 

Heustrich Baths (2295 feet a/s) with old and famous 
sulphur springs. 

Miiienen-Aeschi (2825 feet a/s), whence a cable railway 
offers a very attractive excursion to the Niesen (7763 feet a/s). 

Reichenbach (2336 feet a/s), a quiet summer healtih 
resort with quaint old peasants' homes and the gateway to 
the romantic Kiental. 

Fmtigen (2717 feet a/s), a very charming and prosperous 
village with important cattle markets. An attractive road 
leads from here through the Engstligenbach Valley to 

Adelboden (4467 feet a/s), an Alpine village of inde- 
scribable beauty and charm which is becoming one of the 
leading all-year resorts. 

Between Frutigen and Kandersteg lies the Blausee, the 
much admired "Blue Lake" whose coloring is even dwelt 
upon in Bernese folk-lore. 

Kandersteg (3840 feet a/s), is a name familiar to sport- 
loving people in summer and winter alike. Surrounded by 
a majestic assembly of mountains, it offers a great variety 
of easy and more difficult excursions. The Oeschinen lake, 
the valleys of Gastern and Ueschinen and the mighty falls 
of the Kander in the Klus can easily be visited by the 
average tourist 




The Tamina Gorge at Ragaz 



Phot. Nikles 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 189 

The bridle path over the Gemmi (7553 feet a/s), one of 
Switzerland's most scenic mountain trails, leads to the Baths 
of Leuk in the Valais (see page 172). 

A favorite day's excursion is by train to 

Goppenstein, on the southern side of the Lotschberg 
tunnel and then a tramp into the romantic Lotschen Valley, 
where the customs and costumes of the natives are unusu- 
ally ancient and quaint. 

Soon after leaving Gopp-enstein we obtain a glimpse of a 
small portion of the Rhone Valley in the distance, but the 
whole beautiful picture of the Valaisan landscape does not 
open out until we emerge from the last tunnel just before 
arriving at Hothen, Exclamations of surprise and aston- 
ishment at the beauty of the scenery escape from everyone 
who is making this journey for the first time. Suddenly the 
wide plain of the Rhone Valley is spread out at our feet 
1300 feet below, and a wonderful view of the country is 
obtained. 

After having crossed 20 tunnels and 7 gigantic viaducts 
we reach Brig (page 174), the terminus of the line. 

DIRECT ROUTE FROM LAKE OF THUN TO LAKE OF GENEVA. 

The Bernese Oberland and the Lake of Geneva region are 
directly connected by electric train service leading from 
Spiez to Zweisimmen and Montreux. 

Traveling from Spiez (page 181), we pass Wimmis, 
Ocy-Diemtigen, with the Alpine resort of Grimmialp 
(5150 feet a/s) to the south, reaching Erlenbach and then 
Weissenburg (2919 feet a/s) with noted mineral springs. 

Zweisimmen (3215 feet a/s). A friendly mountain vil- 
lage with all advantages necessary to a summer and winter 
resort. It is also the starting point of a branch line of the 
Montreux-Bernese Oberland railroad, leading to 

Lcnk (3527 feet a/s), prettily situated in full view of the 



190 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

snow-clad Wildstrubel (10,673 feet a/s), which forms a won- 
derful termination of the valley. Owing to its strong sul- 
phur and iron springs it is a much frequented health resort. 
A little farther on beckons 

Gstaad (3450 feet a/s), another picturesque mountain 
village which now occupies a high rank as a summer and 
winter sport center. It is the starting place for numerous 
Alpine excursions, and the junction of the two picturesque 
valleys of Gsteig and Lauenen, whence good roads lead 
over the Col de Pillon (5086 feet a/s) to Les Diablerets 
in the Ormonts Valley (see page 167), and over the Sanetsch 
Pass to Sion in the Rhone Valley (page 171). 

Saanen (3382 feet a/s) is the chief locality in the Upper 
Valley of the Sarine, a very picturesque village, the home of 
the Gruyeres and Vacherin cheese of world renown. The 
line follows the Valley of the Sarine and reaches 

Chateau d'Oex (3180 feet a/s), a favorite all-year resort, 
with excellent sport opportunities. It is set in a cluster of 
lovely mountains and enjoys an ideal climate. 

Passing Rossiniere with its wonderful "Grand Chalet" we 
reach 

Montbovon (2620 feet a/s), at the upper end of the 
Gruyeres Valley, which presents a striking contrast to the 
preceding valley. Here the traveler finds himself carried 
into a wild and romantic country, into beautiful pasture- 
^nds, inhabited by a race of herdsmen clinging to their 
undent customs. It is the home of the Ranz des Vaohes or 
Kuhreihen, the yodel or herd song, which has been made 
familiar by Swiss singers to the outside world. Presently 
we reach 

I^es Avants (3190 feet a/s), a favorite summer resort and 
winter sport center, whose funicular railway, climbing from 
the Montreux-Bernese Oberland railway station to the Col de 
SonJoup, has proven a great boon to the patrons of the won- 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 191 

derful bobsleigh run which descends from this point to 
Les Avants. Lower down is 

Chamby (2200 feet a/s) an incomparable "Belvedere." 
Gazing upon the distant Rhone Valley we behold the stately 
Dent du Midi a glorious vision of immaculate ermine and 
at our feet smiles the beautiful Lake Leman, so much beloved 
by the great poets. On the opposite shore rise proudly the 
Savoy Alps and beyond lies the bluish silhouette of the Jura. 
Chamby is a village of wine-growers and pensions, a place to 
rest in in summer and to toboggan in winter. After another 
short descent we reach 

Montreux (1237 feet a/s), "beautiful as a dream," as 
Byron called it (see page 166). 

CENTRAL SWITZERLAND WITH LUCERNE AS ITS Focus. 

Lucerne (1437 feet a/s) is situated at the northwest end 
of the classic lake of the same name, at the issue of the blue- 
green river Reuss. Owing to its privileged position it pul- 
sates from spring to autumn with a cosmopolitan life. 
Indeed, Lucerne is the center of the Swiss tourist traffic and 
the noble mountains surrounding it, the Rigi, the Pilatus, the 
Biirgenstock and Stanserhorn, are familiar figures in the 
mind of every tourist who has visited this spot, same as 
the proud old Musegg towers which crown old Lucerne, and 
the ancient wooden bridges spanning the Reuss. 

History relates that a colony of monks from the Alsatian. 
Benedictine Abbey of the Murbach founded a little mona** 
tery on the spot where the River Reuss leaves the Lake of 
the Four Cantons, and that the foundation being dedicated 
to Saint Leodegar was known as "Luciaria." The village 
which was gradually built around the ecclesiastical settle- 
ment soon developed into a town, and documents of the 
12th Century mention the same under the name of "Luzzeron" 
or "Lucerren." These facts show that the supposition that 



192 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Lucerne derives its name from the Latin Lucerna light- 
house is altogether of legendary origin, as archaeologists 
have ascertained that no Roman lighthouse has ever stood 
at the outlet of the Reuss. 

Considering that the history of Lucerne is so closely con- 
nected with the Church of St. Leodegar, the traveler who 
cares about old Lucerne should first of all visit the time- 
honored place of worship which had, however, to be partly 
restored after a fire in 1633. As we enter the door we notice 
a curious early 16th Century stone-carving which represents 
the betrayal of Christ in the garden in a most characteristic 
manner. The figure of St. James to the left a weary man 
in his heavy sleep ; St. Peter, making a heroic effort to appear 
to be awake, and St. John, peacefully slumbering with the 
scriptures under his arm. The figure of Christ himself 
reflects all the devotion and obedience He showed to His 
Father's will as He lifts His face toward the rock of His 
salvation, wherefrom an angel with the Cup of Agony in his 
hands appears. The tail of a serpent which has slipped into 
a crevice of the rock serves as a suggestion of the powers 
of evil. Waiting behind Judas are Christ's captors, .some 
with fear and misgivings already visible in their faces, and 
leaning on the garden railing are Moorish soldiers and 
ruffians a clever study in brute power and gaping wonder. 

The interior of the church is of classic beauty and is par- 
ticularly remarkable for its exquisitely carved choir-stalls, 
its artistic forged ironwork, old stained-glass windows and 
its great organ. The latter is one of the oldest and finest 
instruments of its kind. It contains no fewer than 4950 pipes, 
and is fitted with a wonderful "vox humana" and a "vox 
celesta," 

Beyond the church is the old graveyard enclosed by an 
arcade which contains a number of interesting frescoes by 
Deschwanden. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 193 

In close vicinity to this ancient church is the celebrated 
"Lion of Lucerne," executed in 1821 to the memory of 
26 officers and 760 soldiers of the Swiss guard who fell 
in defending the Tuileries on August 10, 1792. The monu- 
ment, which actually measures 26 feet in length, was chiselled 
in the face of a rocky cliff 60 feet in height, and forms, 
owing to its romantic natural surroundings, a most impres- 
sive picture. A spring flows down on one side of the rock 
and gathers in a tiny pool at its base, surrounded by graceful 
trees and dark-green shrubs. In a recess occupying the 
center of the cliff lies the Lion, pierced by a broken lance, 
his face contorted by physical pain, but still protecting the 
Bourbon shield with his paw. Above the animal is the 
simple inscription "Helvetiorum fidei ac virtuti," together 
with the names of the fallen officers. 

A few steps further on is the Glacier Garden, a monument 
of unique geological interest, left by Nature herself. It con- 
sists of nine so-called "pot-holes," of an old glacier, and 
was discovered in 1872 by some workmen who were digging 
the foundation of a house. The largest of them is 31 feet 
deep and measures 27 feet in diameter. Scientists say that 
these holes must evidently have been formed in prehistoric 
times by waters flowing beneath the glacier which then 
extended from the St. Gothard to the northern frontier 
of Switzerland. Water trickling through the fissures of 
the glacier imparted a rotatory motion to stones which, after 
falling upon the ice, also found their way through the 
fissures. In the course of centuries those stones hollowed 
out the holes in the rock beneath and were left in them 
when the glaciers receded; they consist of gneiss, granite 
of the St. Gothard and Alpine limestones, and are yet to 
be seen in their respective places. 

The time-honored towers of the city wall the Musegg, 
which date from the year 1385 and which are now carefully 



194 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

preserved are particular landmarks of Lucerne. Passing 
beneath the gate by the side of the Nollitor and coming 
townwards by the Bruggligasse, one is at once fascinated 
by the many quaint and beautifully painted gables. 

Lucerne, some 400 years ago, was frequently nicknamed 
"the wooden stork's nest," for all its principal buildings 
and bridges at that time were of wood, and according to 
the tendency of those days they were gaily decorated with 
paintings of varied descriptions. Up-to-date Lucerne has, 
however, long ere realized the immense value of those 
mediaeval structures and every effort has hence been made 
to restore those which remained. 

We now approach the Spreuer Bridge, one of the two 
picturesque covered wooden bridges which have been pre- 
served for the generations to come. It dates from the year 
1408, and between the years 1626 and 1632, Kaspar Meglingen 
decorated it with panels of the "Dance of Death," that grue- 
some allegory which was so much fashion in those days. 
Longfellow in his "Hyperion" refers to them: "In almost 
all languages is it written the apparition of the grim spectre 
putting a sudden stop to all business and leading men away 
into the remarkable retirement of the grave. It is written 
in an ancient Spanish poem and painted on a wooden bridge 
in Switzerland. The designs of Holbein are well known. 
The most striking among them is that where, from a group 
of children sitting round a cottage hearth, death has taken 
one by the hand and is leading it out of the door. Quietly 
and unresistingly goes the little child and on its countenance 
no grief but wonder only; while the other children are 
weeping and stretching forth their hands in vain toward their 
departing brother. It is a beautiful design in all save the 
skeleton. An angel had been better, with folded wings and 
torch inverted." 

The other wooden bridge, t. e., the Kapellbriicke is one 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 195 

of Lucerne's most typical landmarks. Same as the Spreuer- 
briicke it crosses the Reuss diagonally, stopping to confer 
almost in mid-stream with a weather-beaten octagonal tower, 
the Wasserturm. In the Kapellbriicke, which was built in 
1333, are 154 painted scenes from Swiss history and from 
the lives of the patron saints of Lucerne: St. Leodegar and 
St. Maurice. 

The Wasserturm, to which tradition refers as a Roman 
lighthouse, was in reality like the Musegg nothing more 
than a part of the fortifications of the city. While it formerly 
contained the town treasury, it is still the storehouse of the 
municipal archives and documents. 

When we have passed over the bridge from the left shore 
of the Reuss, we must devote a few moments to the adjacent 
humble St. Peter's Chapel, with its early 16th Century stone- 
carving of the Nativity and the impressing figure of Niklaus 
von der Flue, that old hermit who did such great work for 
peace in Switzerland. 

Just a few steps farther on we perceive the grand old 
Rathaus in the Kornmarkt. This building which is in the 
purest Renaissance style, contains a Gothic staircase and 
some exquisite inlaid wainscoting and ancient carved wood- 
work, also portraits of magistrates of Lucerne and large 
mural paintings by Reinhard and Wyrsch. On the ground 
floor of this mediaeval edifice, there is a permanent Fine 
Arts Exhibition and an Historical Museum of Applied Arts, 
including the antiquarian collection of the Historical Society 
of the First Five Cantons. Here we find objects from the 
lake dwellings and from prehistoric tombs, numerous weapons 
and trophies from the old Swiss wars, Duke Leopold's coat 
of mail from the Battle of Sempach, and various other 
relics connected with the most interesting events in the 
history of Lucerne. 

Adjoining the steps of the Kornmarkt is the "Gasthaus zu 



196 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Pfistern/' one of the most noteworthy old Lucerne houses. 
It belonged to the guild of bakers and thus bears the coat- 
of -arms of that profession. On the white background is 
painted a spreading vine, from the branches of which hang 
sacks of flour, drinking pots and loaves of bread. Near at 
hand is the so-called "Haus zum Frieden," on which is 
painted a domestic scene, the subject being the return of a 
Swiss soldier from war and the welcome by his family. 

Skillful fresco works can be seen on many other houses, 
as on the Gasthaus zu Metzgern, the Hotel Waage, the Hotel 
Hirschen and others. 

Lucerne is the starting point for an inexhaustible variety 
of excursions, and the lake in particular affords a most 
varied choice of enjoyable trips. 

The Rigi (5900 feet a/s) rises above the lake whose 
waters reflect it in marvelous spectacle. From its top is 
unfolded a sierralike expanse in a radius of 180 miles. 
The ascent via Vitznau, a delightful summer resort, and 
descent via Arth-Goldau and Immensee on the Lake of 
Zug is a round trip never to be forgotten. 

The Pilatus (6995 feet a/s). This is a trip either by boat 
"br rail to Alpnachstad then with the Pilatus Railway, one of 
the boldest railways in the world to Pilatus Kulm 
in an hour and 20 minutes. The Pilatus Railway is 
the only rack-and-pinion railway which has vertical teeth on 
both sides, into which two parts of toothed wheels attached 
to the train work horizontally. The maximum gradient is 
48 per cent, and the panorama enjoyed from the summit of 
this stately mountain is indeed "a glimpse into paradise." 

The Stanserhorn (6236 feet a/s) is another attractive 
excursion point, easily reached from Lucerne in two hours. 
A steamer plies between Lucerne and Stansstad. From there 
an electric railway conveys the traveler in one-quarter of an 
hour to Stans, whence the Stanserhornbahn, an electric cable 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 197 

railway, ascends with a maximum gradient of 60 per cent, to 
the summit in 50 minutes. 

Stans (1510 feet a/s) itself is an interesting little town 
full of historic associations, with an imposing monument to 
the great patriot, Arnold von Winkelried, whose heroic deeds 
in the titanic struggle of the Swiss against their oppressors 
ranks second only to William Tell's exploits in Swiss 
history. 

From Stansstad and Stans an electric railway carries the 
tourist in an hour and 40 minutes to the prettily situated and 
idyllic village of 

Engelberg (3356 feet a/s), a delightful summer resort 
and winter sport center, at the foot of the snow-covered 
Titlis (10,527 feet a/s). Engelberg offers a variety of easy 
excursions as well as high Alpine tours for which guides are 
necessary. 

Bridle paths lead over the Joch Pass (7267 feet a/s) to 
Meiringen (page 187), and over the Surenen Pass (7562 
feet a/s) to Altdorf (page 198). 

On our further explorations of the lake region we are 
invited by such idyllic places as Kehrsiten with the Biir- 
genstock, Beckenried, Treib with the Seelisberg and the 
Riitli, a spot sacred in Swiss history as the cradle of the 
country's liberty. On the opposite bank beckon Weggis 
with its very modern lake baths, Vitznau (the starting 
point for the Rigi) and Gersau. From Brunnen, another 
delightful summer resort, an electric cogwheel railway 
tuns via the prettily situated hamlet of Morschach to Axen- 
fels and Axenstein, whence a most beautiful outlook is to 
be had on the lake. From Brunnen the Axenstrasse one 
of the most famous specimens of highway construction in 
the world leads to Fliielen, passing on the way Tell's 
Chapel at Sisikon and Tell's Platte a little further on, 



198 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

where the hero is said to have sprung from the boat in 
which Bailiff Gessler was taking him to prison. 

Fliielen (1483 feet a/s) is the last steamboat station at the 
the southern end of Lake Lucerne. We may return hence via 
Schwyz to Lucerne or continue the tour to 

Altdorf (1465 feet a/s), which, with the memorial of the 
patriot William Tell, is well worthy of a visit. The little town 
prides itself of a theatre where performances of Schiller's 
great drama are given from time to time. 

From here the Klausen Pass, one of the finest Alpine roads 
leads past Biirglen Tell's birthplace to Linthal (page 204). 

The next station on the Gothard road is Erstfeld in the 
Valley of the Reuss, followed by Amsteg, whence one 
begins to obtain a conception of the stupendous engineering 
difficulties that were encountered and overcome in the con- 
struction of the famous GotJhard line, which is now 
entirely electrified. 

Goeschenen (3640 feet a/s) is the northern entrance to 
the world's second largest the Gothard tunnel (9J4 miles 
long). 

Before that point is reached the line has circled the village 
of Wassen in two spiral tunnels and crossed the Maienreuss 
thrice upon lofty bridges. From Wassen the Susten Pass 
connects with Meiringen in the Bernese Oberland (page 188). 

Andermatt (4738 feet a/s), connected with Goeschenen 
by the electric Schollenen Railroad, is a very attractive sum- 
mer resort and winter sport center. It is the focus for excur- 
sions in the St. Gothard region. 

An excellently constructed road leads over the Oberalp Pass 
to Disentis in the Grisons (page 219) and another road climbs 
via the Furka Pass to Gletsch, the base of the Rhone Glacier 
(page 176). Post auto-bus service is maintained on both of 
these passes. 

Another favorite excursion from Lucerne leads into the 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 199 

so-called Seetal, a smiling valley with the two pretty lakes of 
Baldegg and Hallwil. Near the latter stands the ancient 
chateau of Hallwil, recently beautifully renovated and open 
to visitors. 

A little further on beckons the quaint little town of Lenz- 
burg guarded by two graceful vineclad hills; the Staufen 
with its friendly church and the Schlossberg- with its im- 
posing castle which is now the summer residence of James 
W. Ellsworth, a wealthy New Yorker. 

Being a great lover of music this gentleman recently hit 
upon a rather novel idea, by making an arrangement with the 
brass band of Lenzburg city, which enables him to command 
those amateur musicians to the castle whenever he feels dis- 
posed to hear a few selections! 

A direct railway connecting Lucerne and Berne traverses 
the valley of the Entlebuch, a rich farming district. 

Still another attractive excursion is to Kiissnacht, then 
a walk or drive through the Hohle Gasse, a narrow defile, 
where Tell is said to have shot the bailiff Gessler, which 
event is immortalized by a chapel, the Tellskapelle. A 
little further on lies Immensee whence a delightful trip 
on the idyllic Lake of Zug takes us to the diminutive capital 
of that canton, Zug (1385 feet a/s), a most picturesque, 
ancient town, whence a cable railway carries the tourists 
to the heights of the Zugerberg (3130 feet a/s). 

The most picturesque and probably the most familiar 
route from Lucerne to the Bernese Oberland is by rail- 
way over the Briinig Pass to Meiringen. After passing 
Alpnachstad (1440 feet a/s), starting point of the Pilatus 
railway, the line enters the pasturelands of Obwalden, with 
Kerns-Kagiswil (1620 feet a/s), as the next station and 
entrance to the idyllic Melchtal, with Fluehli-Ranft (2450 
feet a/s) and the Alpine hamlet and health resort of 



200 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Melchtal (2933 feet a/s), the land of St. Nikolaus von 
der Flue. 

Passing Sarnen (1555 feet a/s), the capital of Obwalden 
and Sachseln (1558 feet a/s), picturesquely situated on the 
Lake of Sarnen, the line now ascends a little and changes 
to the rack-and-pinion system at Giswil (1665 feet a/s). 
Presently the placid Lake of Lungern (2160 feet a/s) is 
reached, and after a few minutes' climb Briinig (3295 feet 
a/s) the highest point of the Pass and a truly wonderful point 
of view is attained. From here the line descends in 25 
minutes to Meiringen (page 187). 

EASTERN SWITZERLAND 

Zurich (1345 feet a/s), called the "Athens on the Lim- 
mat" is Switzerland's most populous city. It dates back to 
those early days when a village of lake dwellings stood near 
the spot where the Limmat leaves the Lake of Zurich. The 
Lindenhof and the Uetliberg the latter still showing the 
ruins of the "Refugium" ramparts, are said to have been 
chosen for the first colonies of these primitive settlers on 
terra firma. On the mound of the Lindenhof, the Helvetians 
erected the first fortress of "Turicum," which in the year 
58 B.C., after the battle of Biberakte, fell under the power of 
the Romans. When the Romans withdrew their legions the 
Alemanns became masters of the country, and the Roman 
Turicum became Alemannic Zurich. Under the dominion of 
the German kings and emperors the town acquired importance 
through the monasteries and chapter of the Fraumiinster and 
Grossmiinster, the latter of which is said to have been 
founded by Charlemagne and the former, in 853, by Louis the 
German, who appointed his daughter, Hildegard, as Lady 
Abbess. 

The city enjoys a wonderful situation on the north end of 
the charming lake, nestling between gently sloping shores, 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 201 

vineyards and orchards, imposing villas and flourishing vil- 
lages. In the background tower the snow-covered giants of 
the Alps. The River Limmat divides the town into the "Alfc- 
stadt" (old town) and the "Neu-Stadt" (new town). While 
the former reminds one forcibly of the past, the latter, 
especially such parts of it as the Bahnhofstrasse give us the 
impression of an intensely busy modern town, where brilliant 
shops and stately buildings testify to its commercial standing 
and importance. These contrasts of the old and the new, the 
practical and the artistic, constitute the greatest charm of 
Zurich. 

The Swiss National Museum, a stately building in mediaeval 
style, with a unique historical collection, is the special pride of 
the town, and the Kiinstlerhaus (Art Gallery) containing pic- 
tures of the famous Swiss painters, Bb'cklin, Weld and Hodler 
is another favored haunt of artists and lovers of art. Beauti- 
ful theatres and spacious concert halls, among which the great 
Tonhalle is internationally known, are dignified temples of 
drama and music in which classic and modern plays, operas 
and operettas are successfully given. 

Zurich's most famous place of worship is undoubtedly the 
Grossmiinster, erected in the Romanesque style with the upper 
stories of the towers completed later in the Gothic style. On 
the west tower is enthroned Charlemagne with gilded crown 
and sword in recognition of his donations to the church. The 
interior contains pillars with Romanesque capitals, and three 
large modern stained-glass windows decorate the choir. The 
early 13th Century cloisters have been restored and are well 
worthy of a careful visit. 

The Grossmiinster is moreover famous for its intimate con- 
nection with the great Swiss Reformer Zwingli who, for a 
period of twelve years, beginning with New Year's day, 1519, 
was in charge of this church. A monument is erected to his 
memory at the chancel end of the former Wasserkirche lying 



202 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

opposite. This particular edifice contains now the most inter- 
esting municipal library. 

Zurich has often been described as an intellectual paradise. 
It is the birthplace of the great pedagogue Heinrich Pesta- 
lozzi, whose methods of education were adopted little by little 
by every civilized country. It is the site of the Swiss Poly- 
technical School, of a university and a number of private and 
preparatory institutions in which young people from all parts 
of the world are educated. 

Benevenuto Cellini, the celebrated sculptor of three and one- 
half centuries ago, termed Zurich an "exquisite gem, worthy 
of all admiration" and this holds true to-day. 

There are innumerable pleasant walks and easy excursions 
in the immediate vicinity of the town. Especially frequented 
are the delightful woods on the Ziirichberg and the Uetliberg 
(2677 feet a/s) as well as the Valley of the Sihl. A sail on 
the lake with its richly blessed shores is a great delight. 

Rapperswil (1350 feet a/s), picturesquely situated at the 
upper end of the lake, reached either by boat or train, is 
worthy of a visit The old castle, dating from the 14th 
Century, contains the Polish national collection of treasures 
and relics. In the little chapel in the courtyard is a bronze 
urn with the heart of the Polish General Kosciusko. 

Traveling from Zurich by railway along the left bank of 
the lake, the first point of note is 

Thalwil (1436 feet a/s), a very busy silk manufacturing 
town, doubly important as the junction of the two main lines 
from Central Switzerland (Lucerne) and the Grisons. At 

Wadenswil (1348 feet a/s) a line branches off to the 
famous pilgrimage place of Einsiedeln with its extensive 
Benedictine Monastery and sacred shrines, visited yearly by 
more than 100,000 pilgrims and tourists. At 

PfafEkon connection is made with Rapperswil on the 
right bank of the lake. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 203 

At Zicgelbriicke, a station before the line skirts the 
romantic Wallen See, a branch line enters into the charm 
ing Glarnerland, where Nafels (1434 feet a/s) is the first 
point of interest en route. It was in this region where on 
April 9, 1388, the natives freed themselves from Austrian 
tyranny and in the Rautifelder, where eleven attacks were 
made, stand eleven memorial stones, which are visited 
yearly by the people of Glarus on the anniversary day. 

A short distance higher up beckons the tiny village o f 
Netstal (1485 feet a/s), well known as the entrance >o the 
Klontal, one of the most exquisite Alpine valleys in Switzer- 
land, with a lake whose perfect beauty has been the inspiration 
of countless artists and poets. From Netstal the railway 
reaches 

Glarus (1490 feet a/s), the capital of the Canton of this 
name, situated at the foot of the noble Glarnisch. Although 
it occupies a part of the country which possesses a pronounced 
pastoral character, Glarus has, besides its dairying, many 
thriving industries such as wool-weaving, cotton-spinning and 
dyeing. As the city was the victim of several disastrous fires 
it possesses a rather modern appearance. However, it is not 
without its interesting features, and the church which is har- 
moniously shared between Protestants and Catholics, the town 
hall and other public buildings are well worth a visit. 

Glarus is an excellent center for a variety of delightful 
excursions for amateur and experienced climbers. 

An electric railway leading from Schwanden (1720 feet 
a/s), a thriving village above Glarus, to the summer resort of 
Elm (3220 feet a/s) has helped to enliven the lovely Sernf 
Valley, which is another paradise for Alpinists. The interest- 
ing, but rather fatiguing Segnes Pass leads in eight hours 
from Elm to Flims in the Grisons (page 210), and the equally 
strenuous Panixer Pass connects in 9 l /2 hours with Hans in 
the Grisons (page 219). 



204 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

One of the most important points in the Canton of Glarus 
is Linthal (2168 feet a/s), once a forgotten hamlet and now 
a flourishing resort with the Baths of Stachelberg, known 
for their powerful alkaline sulphur waters. It is the starting 
point for the much admired Klausen Pass (6437 feet a/s) 
kading to Altdorf (page 198). Being now covered by post 
auto-busses, the traffic on this scenic Alpine highway has 
greatly increased and a drive over the Klausen is certainly 
well worth while. 

The Fatschbach Falls, the Thierfehd, the Ueli Alp and the 
wondrous array of mountains all around combine to make 
Linthal one of the most delightful places for persons who seek 
beautiful scenery and a choice of easy and more difficult 
excursions and mountain tours. 

A cable railway climbs from Linthal to 

Braunwald (4113 feet a/s), an Alpine resort o-f poetic 
charm whose sunburnt chalets lie scattered here and there on 
the undulating slopes of the Glarnisch (9580 feet a/s), half 
hidden by luxuriant maple and fir trees. 

Retracing our steps via Nafels to Weesen (1404 feet a/s), 
a smart little resort on the Wallen See, we now skirt this 
truly superb lake to the end, i. e., to 

Wallenstadt (1400 feet a/s), whence the line takes a 
southeasterly direction via Sargans to 

Ragaz-Pfafers (1500 feet a/s) with its world renowned 
thermal springs, prettily situated at the mouth of the boister- 
ous Tamina. This is one of the favorite Swiss Spas and a 
much frequented intermediate station to and from the Grisons 
health resorts. With its magnificent gorge of the Tamina 
and its great choice of excursions into the surrounding moun- 
tain realm, Ragaz is not only a delightful place to sojourn for 
the visitors who take the cure, but can also be made head- 
quarters by tourists bent upon climbing achievements. 




Mountain climbing near Davos, Grisons 
Phot. Meerkamper 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 205 

Leaving Zurich in the opposite direction via Bulach and 
Eglisau the traveler reaches 

Schaffhausen (1332 feet a/s), whose well preserved 
mediaeval buildings give the town the unmistakable stamp of 
a Swabian town of the empire. It well deserves the name of 
"Nuremberg of Switzerland." The Romanesque Cathedral 
(1101 A.D.), now a Protestant church, is of particular interest. 
The cloisters (Kreuzgang) are partly Romanesque, partly 
Gothic. The churchyard was once the burial place of the 
nobility and is now a picturesque wilderness. The old bell, 
cast in 1486, with the inscription, "Vivos Voco, mortuos 
plango, fulgura frango," which suggested to Schiller his im- 
mortal "Song of the Bell" was replaced in 1898 by a new one 
with the same inscription. On the Fronweg-Platz is the ven- 
erable Grosse Haus, a patrician mansion, erected in the 14th 
Century and renovated since. The Munot, a stronghold from 
the 16th Century, with walls 16 feet thick, commands the town. 
The Rathaus with its artistically panelled hall, the Museum of 
Natural History, the many painted houses and fountain 
statues, never fail to delight the lover of the quaint and 
ancient. But Schaffhausen is primarily associated with the 
Falls of the Rhine "] 

Station > reached by train or trolley. 

Neuhausen (1445 feet a/s) J 

Here the Rhine descends 380 feet wide in a 100-foot 
plunge, over an irregular rocky ledge. It is one of the finest 
cascades in Europe, and who could describe it better than 
Ruskin? 

"Stand for an hour beside the Falls of Schaffhausen, on the 
north side, where the rapids are long, and watch how the 
vault of water first bends unbroken in pure polished velocity 
over the arching rocks at the brow of the cataract, covering 
them with a dome of crystal twenty feet thick, so swift that 
its motion is unseen except when a foam-globe from above 



206 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

darts over it like a falling star ; and how the trees are lighted 
above it under all their leaves at the instant that it breaks into 
foam ; and how all the hollows of that foam burn with green 
fire, like so much shattering chrysoprase; and how, ever and 
anon startling you with its white flash, a jet of spray leapa 
out, hissing, like a rocket bursting in the wind and driven 
away in dust, filling the air with light; and how, through the 
curdling wreaths of the restless, crashing abyss below, the 
blue of the water, paled by the foam in its body, shows purer 
than the sky through white rain cloud; while the shuddering 
iris stoops in tremulous stillness over all, fading and flushing 
alternately through the chocking spray and shattered sun- 
shine, hiding itself at last among the thick golden leaves which 
toss to and fro in sympathy with the wild waters, their drip- 
ping masses lifted at intervals, like sheaves of loaded corn, by 
some stronger gush from the cataract, and bowed again upon 
the mossy rocks as its roar dies away." 

From Neuhausen we may return to Zurich via the busy 
manufacturing town of Winterthur and visit the Castle of 
Kyburg, one of the best preserved mediaeval strongholds, or 
we may continue our trip by rail to the region o Lake 
Constance. 

A charming trip is by steamer from Schaffhausen up the 
Rhine, passing the picturesque old town of 

Stein am Rhein (1364 feet a/s) with the stately Castle 
of Hohenklingen and several other pretty villages and 
romantic ruins sprinkled in between; a delightful journey 
indeed, until one reaches the old imperial town of 

Constance on the the southern shore of the Bodensee. 
Proceeding along the lake via the chief Swiss stations of 
Romanshorn, Arbon and Rorschach, we now turn inland to 

St. Gall (2195 feet a/s) the famous embroidery seat of 
modern days and one of the most influential centers of 
Christian: civilization: in: Central Europe- The city owes its 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 207 

foundation to the Irish Apostle, Callus, whoy irr the year 614 r 
founded a hermitage near the brook, Steinach.. In the result- 
ing monastery of St. Gall, the strict rules of the Irish Church 
were enforced until 720, whem those of St. Benedict were 
substituted by an abbot, Othman. In 1061, the Abbot Norpert 
of St. Gall erected a conv.ent on the Sitter River, the place 
taking the name of Abbatis Cella-Appenzell',. and the abbots; 
of St. Gall became the dominating influence in the land until 
the subsequently much oppressed mountaineers resorted ta 
force and succeeded in shaking off their yoke.. 

The Benedictine Abbey itself was suppressed in 1805, and 
accommodates now the cantonal offices, the bishop's residence 
and the famous library. This library comprises some 30,00(1 
volumes and a wealth of valuable manuscripts.. It prides itself 
for instance of the celebrated "Psalteruirrn Aureum" the 
Golden Psalter so-called on account of its golden writing on 
white. parchment;: of a Niebelungenlied of the 13th Century,, 
of manuscripts relating; ta Parsifal and other heroes sung by 
Wagner.. 

The abbey church itself, rebuilt in 1756-6S in the Rococo 
style,, is very imposing- without and lavishly decorated inside. 
In addition to the finely carved choir stalls and a beautiful 
iron choir screen,, which form one of the chief attractions of 
the interior, the organ,, the chancel,, the lovely frescoes on the 
ceiling and the church treasury are renowned features of this 
Cathedral. 

The town is extremely rich in a variety of enjoyable excur- 
sions',, particularly into the rich pastureland of the Canton of 
Appenzell, with such delightful places as> 

Heiden (2657 feet a/s), Trogeit (2975 feet a/s), Speicher 
(3070 feet a/s) and Gais (3075 feet a/s).. 

The capital of this diminutive Cantoni 

Appenzell (2595 feet a/s) deserves also a visit.. Its 
foundation dates back ta 1061 A.D.,. and the place has tovday 



208 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

yet retained much of its old-fashioned charm. Hand- 
embroidery is a highly developed home industry in this 
region. In close proximity is 

Weissbad (2680 feet a/s), a well-known health resort, 
and about one hour and a half above, in an interesting and 
extensive region of caves, which is noted for prehistoric finds, 
stands the picturesque retreat -of the Wildkirchli, whose 
founder, a priest from Appenzell, erected here in the year 
1656 a little hermitage with chapel for himself. In the year 
1679 he willed the Wildkirchli to the State of Innerrhoden, 
specifying that it should remain a hermitage forever. Some 
16 hermits lived consecutively in this mountainous solitude, 
until 1851, when the hermit's dwelling was abandoned as such 
and transformed into a commodious inn, in order to accom- 
modate the great number of pilgrims and tourists who yearly 
flock to the hermit's chapel of St. Michael. A memorial 
tablet in the vicinity also reminds of the poet Victor von 
Scheffel, author of "Ekkehard," who completed this well- 
known novel up here in the year 1854. 

From here the Ebenalp (5250 feet a/s), the Seealpsee (3747 
feet a/s) and the Hohen Kasten (5900 feet a/s) are favorite 
excursion points. From 

Herisau (2550 feet a/s), another delightful spot in this 
region, we continue our trip into the charming and histori- 
cally known Toggenburg, with the chief places of Lichten- 
steig, Wattwil, Ebnat, Kappel and Nesslau (2470 feet a/s). 
A carriage road connects with Wildhaus (3600 feet a/s), 
starting point for excursions into the higher Alpine region of 
the Churfirsten (7576 feet a/s) and Sands (8216 feet a/s) 
group. 

The carriage road from Wildhaus connects with Buchs in 
the Rhine Valley, frontier station of the Zurich-Vienna line, 
whence we may proceed to the Grisons. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 209 

THE GRISONS 

The Grisons, Switzerland's largest canton, may readily be 
described as an Alpine wonderland. It is broken up by no 
fewer than 150 valleys, varying greatly in size, traversed by 
wild rushing torrents and streams and animated by roaring 
waterfalls and transparent mountain lakes. Dark green fir- 
woods and velvety pastures cover the slopes and form the 
transition from the region of the hills to the realm of the high 
Alps. 

While the unusually mountainous nature of this section of 
the country would lead one to believe that its history would 
be of comparatively modern date, existing records show that 
Raetus, Prince of the Etruscan tribe, had invaded this district 
as early as 600 B.C. He named the conquered territory 
Rhaetia, but the same included at that time the Tyrol and 
Vorarlberg, the Bavarian highlands and the northern stretch 
of Lombardy as well. 

One of the most venerable spots in the entire region is 

Chur or Coire (1936 feet a/s), the capital of the Canton, 
which traces its foundation back to the Roman Era, when it 
was generally known as Curia Rhaetorum. The old quarters 
of this unpretentious, yet strangely fascinating city prove an 
inspiration to photographers and artists. Narrow, crudely 
paved streets; massive stone houses with quaintly contrived 
entrances, stairs and gates; here a turn and there a turn and 
suddenly a diminutive open square, suitable for small public 
gatherings in comparative safety and privacy, an important 
factor in feudal days. One of these picturesque haunts is 
known as "der siisse Winkel" "the sweet corner," and when 
beheld in the silvery glimmer of a full moon, this nook is 
indeed worthy of its designation. 

What is known as the Episcopal Court occupies high ground. 
Here the Cathedral of St. Lucius, begun in the 12th Century 
and consecrated in 1282, and the Bishop's Palace, face upon a 



210 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

square, adorned with a fountain, the entire quarter being 
surrounded with walls, >so that its general appearance is 
like a fortress. The bishopric is first mentioned in the Acts 
of a Synod of Milan, in 452; but there is the legend of a mis- 
sionary, a certain Saint Lucius, from Britain, who is supposed 
to have established himself here at an earlier time. In close 
vicinity of Chur are the 

Baths of Passugg (2720 feet a/s), much frequented for 
the curative effects of their chalybeate springs. A pleasant 
excursion from Chur is per post auto-bus to Parpan (4356 
fee a/s), Lenzerheide (4844 feet a/s) and Tiefenkastel 
(2811 feet a/s), all three charming summer and winter 
resorts. 

Arosa (5904 feet a/s), reached from Chur by one of the 
most picturesque electric railways, is one of the highest health 
resorts in the country. It reposes like a jewel on a cushion 
of luxuriant green; fragrant pine forests and a glorious 
cluster of snow-crowned Alpine peaks form its setting. On 
account of its lofty, sunny position, which is nevertheless 
sheltered, Arosa has become one of the most famous Swiss 
health and pleasure resorts. 

From Chur the main route takes us to 

Reichenau-Tamins (1995 feet a/s), whence post auto- 
busses take visitors to 

Flims-Waldhaus (3621 feet a/s), a forest-enclosed resort 
on the romantic Lake of Cauma. 

The Segnes group with Piz Segnes (10,230 feet a/s) forms 
inviting ground for mountaineering excursions. 

Proceeding from Reichenau in a southerly direction we 
pass the spa of Rothenbrunnen and presently reach 

Thusis (2369 feet a/s), a friendly town encircled by 
luxuriant orchards and yet in closest vicinity to one of the 
wildest chasms which nature has wrought into the Grisons 
mountains the Via Mala, a gorge of stupendous grandeur in 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 211 

the depths of which the Rhine is thundering in ceaseless indig- 
nation against its oppressing forces. 

From here the Post road leads via the lovely health 
resort of Andeer (3212 feet a/s), (whence Cresta, 6438 feet 
a/s, another climatic resort in the Aversertal is reached) to 
Spliigen, excursions which can be highly recommended. From 
Spliigen the diligence connects via the Spliigen Pass with 
Chiavenna (page 214), and another Alpine Post leads via 
the San Bernardino Pass (4821 feet a/s) to Mesocco, whence 
connection is made by rail with Bellinzona (page 221). 

The section of the Rhaetian Railway between Thusis and 
St. Moritz is known as the Albula line. While it is but 38.34 
miles long, the nature of the mountains traversed is such that 
the number and length of the tunnels and viaducts on this 
line are extraordinarily great. Besides the Albula tunnel, 
which is 3^4 miles in length, and which is the longest tunnel 
ever built on a narrow gauge railway, there are 38 smaller 
tunnels, the total length of which is 33,350 feet. While a trip 
over this road of scenic and technical wonders has always been 
a rare delight, it has become more so still, since every possible 
inconvenience through smoke in tunnels has been eliminated 
with the electrification of the railway. 

From Thusis the railroad serves in succession Tiefenkastel 
(see page 210), Alvaneu (3285 feet a/s) with the well fre- 
quented Baths of Alvaneu, Filisur (3550 feet a/s) at the 
junction of the line from Davos, Bergiin (4505 feet a/s), a 
pretty village which has lately also joined the rank of the 
winter stations; Preda (5880 feet a/s), the starting point of 
the interesting old Albula Road, which leads across to Ponte 
in the Upper Engadine, and Bevers (5620 feet a/s) at the 
foot of the Crasta Mora, whence a branch line of the 
Rhaetian Railway proceeds to Schuls-Vulpera-Tarasp in 
the Lower Engadine. (See page 216.) 

The next point of interest en route is Samaden (5670 feet 



212 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



a/s), the chief locality of the Upper Engadine, with many 
handsome private dwellings, whose style of architecture is 
typical of this region. 

The village enjoys a particularly fine location in full view 
of the wondrous Bernina chain with its unforgetable group 
of peaks. Piz Palii (12,835 feet), Piz Morteratsch (12,317 
feet), Piz Tschierva (11,693 feet), Piz Roseg (12,934 feet), 
Piz Rosatsch (10,100 feet) and Piz della Margna (10,376 
feet) 'they are indeed true monarchs of the Alps and the 
ambition of all experienced climbers. 

Samaden offers a great variety of delightful walks through 
woods and pastures and is an ideal starting point for many 
interesting excursions which can safely be made by amateur 
climbers. 

An almost obligatory trip is to the Muottas Muraigl (8200 
feet a/s), easily reached by a mountain railway; from this 
point the visitor will enjoy a far-sweeping outlook on the 
wonder valley of the Inn. To golfers Samaden is a particu- 
larly important spot in the Grisons, possessing, as it does, a 
perfect 18-hole course with well-equipped club house. A 
branch line of the railway proceeds from Samaden to 
Pontresina (page 214). 

Passing Celerina (5685 feet a/s), a pleasant summer and 
winter resort and junction of the Bernina Railroad coming 
from St. Moritz, we presently reach this world famous sum- 
mer resort and winter sport center, which is the terminus of 
the Upper Engadine section of the Rhaetian Railway. 

St. Moritz lies on the beautiful lake of the same name in 
the loftiest valley in Europe, on the sunny slope of Piz Nair 
(10,045 feet), and although it has an altitude of 6089 feet a/s, 
it is celebrated for the extraordinary wealth of its flora. 
While it is generally known as a very modem leader of sports 
and fashions, it has nevertheless a very old history, it being 
referred to as a pilgrimage place in the 15th Century. The 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 213 

leaning tower of the old church, which is all that is left of 
that edifice and which is a characteristic feature of the village, 
dates back to the year 1573. 

The resort is divided into two sections, "the village" and 
"the Baths," the latter with extensive cure establishments 
where the health-giving chalybeate waters, whose wonderful 
qualities were already known in the Roman era, are taken 
advantage of by visitors from all lands. 

One of the most delightful walks or drives can be taken 
from here to Maloja, along the exquisite Upper Engadine 
lakes. 

Campfer (6020 feet a/s), a diminutive village at the en- 
trance to the Suvretta Valley, is the first resort we 
encounter on this excursion. Its radiant reflection is mir- 
rored in the crystal depths of its charming lake which we 
follow to Silvaplana (5955 feet a/s), another fairy-like spot 
with another md larger lake. Silvaplana is situated on the 
alluvial deposits of the j'ulier brook, which separates these 
two lakes of Campfer and Silvaplana. 

Skirting the Lake of Silvaplana we next reach 

Sils (5950 feet a/s), embracing the picturesque hamlets of 
Sils-Baselgia and Sils Maria; from the latter a most enchant- 
ing walk can be had into the lovely Fex Valley. From Sils 
the magnificent Lake of Sils extends to 

Maloja (5940 feet a/s), the summit of the lowest pass 
between Switzerland and Italy, which descends rapidly from 
here into the Val Bregaglia. 

Every one of the little villages scattered along this wonder 
road of transparent Alpine lakes may be considered as excel- 
lent headquarters for a great variety of delightful excursions 
and Alpine tours, and it is therefore not surprising that this 
lofty realm is also well patronized during the season of white. 

At Maloja are ten large glacier mills or giant cauldrons 
which serve as an excellent illustration of the action of the 



214 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

glacier -which once covered this region. One of the multitude 
of excursions which can be made from Maloja should : .;lude 
a visit to the Lunghino Lake (two hours from Maloja) from 
which the River Inn emerges. 

From Maloja a post road leads to Chiavenna with connec- 
tion to the Lake of Como. 

From Silvaplana a post road leads over the Julier Pass to 
Tiefenkastel, then to Churwalden-Chur (page 210). 

From St. Lloritz we now proceed by the electric Bernina 
Railway via Celcrina to 

Pontresina (5915 feet a/s), one of the most enchantingly 
situated spots in the Upper Engadine. Sombre pine forests 
encircle this stately village which on account of its 
very convenient proximity to the finest glaciers and moun- 
tains in the Grisons is equally well patronized in summer and 
in winter. Shady wood promenades lure those who cannot 
undertake strenuous excursions and the glorious outlook 
enjoyed from the same into the wondrous Roseg Valley and 
adjacent peaks fills the beholder with visions of paradise. 

Excursions to the Morteratsch and Roseg glaciers can be 
taken by everybody, as tke available transportation facilities 
make this a delightful half-day's outing; more ambitious 
walkers may undertake the easy 2 T < hours' climb of the Schaf- 
berg (8965 feet a/s), a splendid point of view, which can also 
be reached by donkey. A little more fatiguing is the ascent 
of Piz Languard (10,716 feet a/s), requiring about four hours, 
but this expedition would provide good training for a still 
more strenuous climb. 

From Pontresina the Bernina Railway, one of the most 
scenic of Swiss Alpine railways, follows the old Bernina Post 
Road over the Pass to Tirano in Italy. Morteratsch, this 
gate of the glacier of the same name, Bernina Hospice 
(7575 feet a/s) romantically situated above the Lago 
Bianco facing the Cambrena Glacier, Alp Griim (7182 feet 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 215 

a/s) where the Palii Glacier and the Poschiavo Valley be- 
low form an unforgetable picture, they are spots on the 
line which make this trip one of the obligatory outings from 
the Upper Engadine. 

This marvelous railway is kept open all the year, powerful 
locomotives being employed in winter for 'the clearing of the 
tracks from snow. 

From Alp Griim the line descends in wonderful curves to 
Poschiavo (3315 feet a/s), the ancient little capital of the 
valley, and proceeds via Brusio (2477 feet a/s) and Campo 
Cologne (1835 feet a/s) (the frontier station) to Tirano, 
starting point of the railway to Colico on Lake Como, and of 
the Alpine highway to Bormio-Stelvio Pass and Traf oi. From 
Poschiavo an omnibus connects with Le Prese (3156 feet 
a/s), a watering place with alkaline and sulphurous springs. 
From the heights of the Upper Engadine, which extends 
from Maloja to Punt Ota in a distance of 25 miles and with 
an average altitude of 6000 feet a/s, we now proceed by a 
branch line of the Rhaetian Railway to the Lower Engadine, 
which reaches as far as Martinsbruck on the Tyrolese fron- 
tier, a distance of 33^2 miles, with an altitude gradually 
descending from 4920 to 3280 feet a/s. Owing to the less 
elevated situation, the climate in the Lower Engadine is con- 
siderably warmer than in the Upper Engadine and vegetation 
is consequently far more luxuriant. Meadows and fields clad 
with the most beautiful of verdure and flowers rise from the 
banks of the River Inn and all the mountain heights are cov- 
ered with splendid woods. Ruins of ancient strongholds and 
castles peep here and there through the dark-green forests 
silent reminders of the eventful days gone by when this part 
of Switzerland had to endure the yoke of Austrian tyranny. 
From Samaden the train winds its way past Ponte to 
Zuoz (5615 feet a/s), a stately village which once held 
the rank of capital of the Engadine, with a number of typical 



216 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Engadine houses and the ancient "Tuor," the former seat of 
the aristocratic Grisons family von Planta. A little further 
down are 

Scanfs (5413 feet a/s) and Cinuskel (5300 feet a/s), two 
delightful Alpine resorts, and presently we perceive the pic- 
turesque old wooden bridge, the "Punt Ota," which forms the 
dividing line between the Upper and Lower Engadine. 

The valley now contracts and the train winds its way 
through several tunnels on to 

Zernez (4910 feet a/s), the starting point of the Ofen 
Pass to Santa Maria (whence the Umbrail leads to the 
Stelvio) and Minister (whence a diligence runs to Mais). 

Zernez is also a starting point for the Swiss National Park, 
a great reservation established on the same principle as the 
American National parks, where flora and fauna have for 
almost two decades been left entirely undisturbed. 

Siis (4689 feet a/s), another delightful Engadine village 
with a wealth of the quaint and curious, and very fine carna- 
tion nurseries, is the Post Station at the end of the Fluela 
Pass leading to Davos. 

Past the picturesque resorts of Lavin (4690 feet a/s), 
Guarda (5423 feet a/s) and Ardetz (4812 feet a/s) we still 
follow the course of the Inn, but the railroad is now high 
above the deeply embedded river. The landscape assumes a 
more and more romantic aspect until we reach 

Tarasp-Schuls-Vulpera, one of Europe's finest spas, 
formed by a cluster of three resorts separated from each 
other by a short walking distance only. 

While Schuls (4080 feet a/s) is the terminal of the railroad, 
carriages are at the disposal of guests of Tarasp (3946 feet 
a/s), with its extensive Kurhaus establishments, and Vulpera 
(4183 feet a/s), facing Schuls on the opposite side of the 
river, a gateway also to the National Park and starting point 
for numerous tours and climbing expeditions. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 217 

Chronicles relate how in the 15th and 16th centuries a few 
solitary pilgrims in quest of health journeyed to the "salt- 
springs" of Tarasp; how they took the waters there, but were 
guided by some strange instinct to establish their temporary 
homes higher up, on the sunlit plateau where the hotels of 
Vulpera, enframed by woods and meadows, beckon to 20th 
Century visitors. 

One of the most delightful side trips to be made from Vul- 
pera is to the beautifully renovated Castle of Tarasp, the seat 
of the Austrian governors up to 1803, and at present the 
home of the ex-Duke and ex-Duchess of Hessen. A tiny lake 
and a dear little hamlet dream at the foot of this rocky 
height which is one of the best known landmarks in the 
country. Facing Vulpera on the other side of the Inn beckons 
the pretty resort of Fetan (5404 feet a/s). 

From Schuls a diligence road leads to 

Val Sinestra (5000 feet a/s), a well-known watering 
place, and to Martinsbruck, thence to Austria. 

The Fluela Pass (7835 feet a/s), between Siis and Davos, 
forms the connecting link between the Lower Engadme and 
the Davos Valley. It is an ancient thoroughfare, but the 
present scientifically built road dates back only to 1868. A 
comfortable little hotel, described as "the Hospice," on the 
summit caters to travelers and wayfarers. In the vicinity 
are two diminutive lakes of entirely different characteristics; 
one with greenish-white glacier water, the other with trans- 
parently clear spring water. As this region offers an unsu- 
ally large variety of mountain excursions, it is more and more 
becoming the rendezvous of Alpinists in summer and winter. 
Skis are, of course, the means of locomotion during the 
season of white. 

Davos (5200 feet a/s), formerly principally known as one 
of the foremost pioneers among the Swiss health resorts, is 
on account of its splendid scenic advantages steadily gaining 



218 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



in popularity as a tourist and sport center. Divided into two 
distinct quarters, Dorf and Platz, this formerly tiny settle- 
ment has become a miniature capital of the Grisons high- 
lands, with imposing hotels and restaurants, and shops, whose 
ultra-smart displays never fail to attract and delight the 
feminine visitors. 

As the climatic-curative advantages of Davos are about 
equal throughout the year it is frequented in summer as an 
enchanting abode for a restful change. 

Priding itself with the largest skating rink in Europe, with 
numerous opportunities for fine ski tours to realms of varying 
altitude, and a choice of wonderful toboggan and bob-sleigh 
runs, this resort is one of the liveliest sport centers in the land 
of the Alps in winter. As a health resort it is primarily vis- 
ited for chest, throat and nerve complaints, but amateur and 
expert climbers regard Davos as a veritable paradise for inter- 
esting tours and ascents. 

A bridle path leads from Davos over the Strela Pass into 
the Schanfigg Valley, with Arosa (page 210) and the Sca- 
letta Pass, forms a direct connection with Scanfs in the 
Upper Engadine. Train connection can be made via 
Wiesen and Spinabad (4816 feet) with Filisur (page 211). 

Klosters (3965 feet a/s), consisting of three hamlets, 
'Dorfli, Platz and Briicke, is another pleasant summer resort 
and winter sport center, offering wonderful excursions into 
the glaciers of the Silvretta group, etc. We pass Serneus 
(3225 feet a/s), a watering place, and reach 

Kiiblis (2664 feet a/s), another picturesque village lower 
down, whence a coach road leads to the charming resort of 

St. Antonien (4659 feet a/s). Fideris with Fideris Baths 
(3463 feet a/s), the latter known for its mineral springs, 
are charming places a little further on from Kublis. 
Past Landquart tihis Prattigau branch of the Rhaetian 
Railway leads to Chur. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 219 

Starting from Chur via Reichenau we now proceed into the 
Grisons Oberland, to Ilanz and Disentis. 

The numerous quaint villages along and in the neighbor- 
hood of the line are well worth a visit. There is 

Versan-Safien (2095 feet a/s) for instance, the starting 
point for the Safien Valley, which is a veritable paradise for 
botanists and lovers of flowers. The next village, 

Valendas (2700 feet a/s), possesses a most unique foun- 
tain surmounted by a mermaid wearing an enormously large 
hat. The statue dates from the 18th Century, when a retired 
Dutch Admiral settled here, together with some of his nautical 
acquaintances, and it is supposed that this style of fountain 
was chosen as a reminder of the sea. 

Presently we reach 

Ilanz (2345 feet a/s) the "first town on the Rhine," with 
many beautiful old-fashioned houses, churches and remainders 
of former fortifications. It is dominated by Piz Mundaun, 
the Rigi of the Grisons Oberland. 

History voices her presence everywhere. There is 

Trims (2835 feet a/s), a prosperous little commune with 
an ancient church and Rathaus, decorated with fine portraits 
and coat-of-arms. Most famous, however, are the exquisite 
frescoes of St. Ann's Chapel, built in memory of the forma- 
tion of the "Gray League" in 1424 A.D. 

Somvix (3440 feet a/s), a beautifully situated Alpine vil- 
lage, beckons a little farther on. Here opens the pretty 
Somvix Valley with the well known Teniger Bad (4176 feet 
a/s), a favorite Spa with chalybeate springs. 

And now we reach 

Disentis (3765 feet a/s), the seat of the oldest existing 
Monastery in Switzerland, which was founded by St. Sigis- 
bert, a disciple of St. Columbanus, in the year 614 A.D. 
Disentis has become particularly famous as a health resort on 
account of its strong radio-active mineral spring, which was 



220 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

found in the extensive park of the Kurhaus Disentiserhof. 
The village enjoys a most ideal situation. It is embedded on 
a carpet of soft green meadows and encircled by splendid 
woods over which tower the Alps in glorious splendor. 

From Disentis we may leave the Grisons by diligence over 
the Oberalp Pass to Andermatt and Goeschenen to connect 
with the Gothard route (page 198) or proceed by diligence 
via the Lukmanier road to Acquarossa (page 221). 

SOUTHERN SWITZERLAND 

From the sedate north, with its luxuriously green pastures, 
its fragrant forests and dainty homelike chalets, the electrified 
St. Gothard Railway takes us within a brief fifteen minutes 
through the tunnel into the sun-kissed land of Goethe's Hero- 
ine. From Teutonic Switzerland we have entered the thresh- 
old of Italian Switzerland, buoyant with sunshine, warmth and 
color. Walnut and chestnut groves climb up the hillsides and 
extensive areas of well-tended vineyards indicate that viti- 
culture has attained a remarkably high degree in this region. 
A distinctive Italian brightness is prevalent everywhere, from 
the gayly decorated houses to the brilliant Lombard Campa- 
nile. The whole atmosphere has changed and the inhabitants, 
too, show evidence of the proverbial light-hearted Italian 
temperament. 

Airolo (3755 feet a/s) is at the southern end of the St. 
Gothard Tunnel. A path leads to the picturesque lake of 
Ritom (6000 feet a/s), which supplies the electric power for 
the Gothard line, with the holiday resort of 

Piora (6125 feet a/s). A path over the Uoma Pass (7257 
feet a/s) connects with the post route Disentis-Acquarossa. 

Above and along the course of the foaming Ticino winds 
our track; frequent waterfalls relieve in silvery clouds the 
monotony of the rocky mountain sides and a diminutive 
chapel or shrine perched here and there high on a precipice 




. 

o 

I" 



1 

:S 

.s 

8- 



tat 



/*\ 

- ***^*^^ 





Ski-ing on the Chatzehubel, Adelboden, Bernese Oberland 
Phot. Nikles 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 221 

makes us wonder just why anybody could select such an inac- 
cessible spot as a place of devotion. 

Rodi-Fiesso (3100 feet a/s), Faido (2485 feet a/s), 
Lavorgo (2025 feet a/s) and historical Giornico (1480 feet 
a/s), picturesque villages situated on a section of the line 
which abounds in technical marvels, pass in succession and 
we reach 

Biasca (971 feet a/s) an interesting village at the open- 
ing of Val Blenio, where fig-trees and mulberries begin to 
appear. 

Acquarossa (1740 feet a/s), a much frequented watering 
place, with arsenous chalybeate springs, is connected with 
Biasca by rail, and a post route leads from Acquarossa to 

Olivone (2925 feet a/s), the highest point of the valley. 
From here the diligence road goes over the Lukmanier Pass 
(6290 feet a/s) to Disentis (page 219) and a footpath 
climbs over the Greina Pass into the Somvix Valley 
(page 219). 

Bellinzona (760 feet a/s), the picturesque capital of the 
Canton of Ticino, is the key to the three passes over the St. 
Gothard, the Lukmanier and the San Bernardino. The three 
proud old fortresses which command every visitor's attention 
are the Castle of San Michele or Uri, the Castle of Monte- 
bello or Schwyz and the Castle of Corbario or Unterwalden. 
These names date back to the time when the strongholds were 
the residence of the bailiffs of the three districts so desig- 
nated near the Lake of Lucerne. These bailiffs also ruled 
over the lower Ticino Valley. 

An electric railway runs to Mesocco (2522 feet a/s), con- 
necting there with the San Bernardino post route leading into 
the Grisons. 

From Bellinzona, branching off to the right is 

Locarno (680 feet a/s) the fair queen of Lago Maggiore, 
that beautiful lake which forms a connecting link between 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

the rugged glories of the Alps and the quiet fertile plains of 
Lombardy. Locarno's history dates back to the time of the 
Romans and Celts and it is estimated that its foundation took 
place in the 6th Century B.C. 

The Piazza Grande, a great square, traverses the town 
almost in its entire length from the quay to the Via Alia 
Motta. On one side it is bordered by picturesque houses with 
arcades, and on the other side lie the public gardens enclosing 
the Casino and post office. The center of the old town, with 
its many quaint little streets and numerous ancient houses of 
fine architecture is the business quarter and at the same time 
the site of various venerable churches. 

Perched on a wooded rock high above the town, overlook- 
ing the deep blue lake, is the pilgrimage church of the 
Madonna del Sasso reached by a funicular. A footpath leads 
up a very steep mountainside and is lined with the fourteen 
Stations of the Cross. Natives and visiting pilgrims, in out- 
landish garb, are in constant evidence on this road. 

On the hilltop the peaceful stillness of the cloisters dwells. 
The interior of the church, which was founded in 1480 and 
rebuilt in 1569, contains two choice oil paintings, ''The Flight 
Into Egypt," by Bramantino and "The Entombment," by 
Ciseri. 

On the open space before the church or in the gallery from 
between the Romanesque pillars, an inexpressibly beautiful 
panorama unveils itself before the admiring eye, reaching 
from Bellinzona as far as Luino. 

An excursion by electric railway to 

Bignasco in the Val Maggia, a picturesque vale with 
hamlets and villages amidst an almost tropical vegetation, 
and yet with a climate rarely exceeding 82 Fahrenheit, 
is a delight, and the outskirts of the town itself, at Muralto 
on the left and at Ascona. Ronco and Brissago on the right, 
one encounters some of the most exquisite bits of Italian life. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 223 

Lugano (932 feet a/s), reached from Locarno by rail or 
via Luino-Ponte Tresa by steamer and rail, presents with its 
wonderful suburbs of Paradise and Cassarate and with its 
gracefully curved bay, a picture of a miniature Naples. 

Lugano, like Locarno, traces its origin back to the Roman 
era. By the 10th Century the town had acquired some degree 
of importance, for Otto I, Emperor of Germany, presented 
the marketplace to Bishop Adelgirus of Como. For five 
centuries Lugano and the surrounding country were the 
scenes of continual conflicts between the Lords of Como and 
Milan and other Italian factions. Later on, tinder the rule 
of the Confederated Cantons, Lugano enjoyed peace for more 
than three centuries, and in 1803 it became a regular member 
of the Swiss Confederation. 

The old town, with narrow arcaded streets, lies on a strip 
of flat land on the shore of the lake, but the new town, a 
smart community of hotels and villas, spreads itself in 
amphitheatre fashion on the lake shore and low hills adjoin- 
ing. The church of Santa Maria degli Angioli, bears a fine 
fresco by Luini in three sections of "The Passion," "The Last 
Supper" and "The Madonna." Further specimens of Luini's 
work or that of his pupils may be found in various other 
churches in the district. The Cathedral of San Lorenzo 
possesses a costly marble facade by Tommaso Rodari and a 
statue of rare beauty, "La Desolazione" (Desolation) by 
Vincenzo Vela, adorns the city park. 

Nearby Ligornetto prides itself with the Museum Vela, 
the dignified home of the works of Vincenzo Vela, one of 
Switzerland's most prominent sculptors. 

The Lake of Lugano is the very embodiment of bewitch- 
ing loveliness and tender harmony. Day and night, dawn and 
twilight, they all reveal some special charm of this heavenly 
expanse of water, this glorious wonder which reposes in fairy 
bowers of blossoms, shrubberies and trees. 



224 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Delightful excursion points beckon here in bewildering 
numbers : 

Castagnola, Gandria, Lorenzo, Morcote and M elide, 
Capolago whence an electric railway leads to the Monte 
Generoso the Rigi of the South Cassarate with a funicu- 
lar to the Monte Bre. A mile long cable railway leads also 
to the Monte San Salvatore, the immediate guardian of 
Lugano. 

From Lugano we may proceed per steamer to Ponte Tresa, 
thence by rail to Luino and steamer to the Borromean Islands, 
Pallanza, Stresa, Baveno, joining the Simplon route; or we 
may reach the Lake of Como region via Chiasso or via 
Porlezza Menaggio-Bellagio. 



PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATION OF ITINERARIES 
FOR TOURS OF SHORT PERIODS 

SUGGESTIONS FOR TOURS OF EIGHT DAYS 

7. Entering at Basle 

1st Day. Proceed via Olten to Lucerne; explore the city in 
the afternooon. 

2nd Day. Excursion on the lake and proceed for the evening 
either to the Rigi, Pilatus, Stanserhorn or 
Biirgenstock; stay over night for sunset and 
sunrise. 

3rd Day. Proceed via Briinig route to Interlaken, stopping 
en route at Meiringen for a visit to the gorge 
of the River Aar. 

4th Day. Visit one of the surrounding mountain heights or 
make the round trip via Lauterbrunnen-Schei- 
degg-Jungfraujoch-Scheidegg-Grindelwald. 

5th Day. Leave by steamer for Spiez; then proceed by rail 
via Zweisimmen to Montreux. 

6th Day. Excursion to the Castle of Chillon in the morning 
and ascent of the Rochers de Nave in the after- 
noon. 

7th Day. Steamer to Geneva and return to Montreux by rail. 

8th Day. Leave for Lausanne; explore the city. 
Leave via Vallorbe for France or via Simplon for Italy. 

//. Entering at Basle 
1st to 4th day as in Tour I. 

5th Day. Leave Interlaken for Spiez-Brigue-Zermatt. 

225 



226 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



6th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat and proceed for the 

evening via Visp to Montreux. 
7th Day. Proceed from Montreux via the Gruyere Valley 

to Bulle-Fribourg-Berne. 
8th Day. Explore this interesting city. 

Leave via Neuchatel-Pontarlier for France, or via Thun- 
Brigue for Italy. 

///. Entering at Basle 

1st Day. Proceed via Brugg to Zurich and explore the city. 
2nd Day. Leave via Arth-Goldau to Rigi-Kulm and proceed 

for the evening via Vitznati to Lucerne. 
3rd Day. Excursion on the lake to Fliielen; thence by train 

or trolley to Altdorf. 

4th Day. Post auto-bus via the Klausenpass to Linthal. 
5th Day. Excursion from Linthal to Braunwald or another 

point of view. 

6th Day. Leave via Glarus-Chur-Thusis to St. Moritz. 
7*th Day. Visit one of the famous "Alps" renowned for their 

rich flora or take a drive along the Upper 

Engadine lakes to Maloja. 
8th Day. Excursion to Muottas Muraigl. 
Leave via Bernina Railroad for Italy. 

IV. Entering at Basle 

1st and 2nd day as in Tour I. 

3rd Day. Proceed via Briinig route to Meiringen; visit the 

gorge of the River Aar. 
4th Day. Post auto-bus over Grimsel Pass to Gletsch 

(Rhone Glacier) ; thence over Furka Pass to 

Andermatt. 
5th Day. Leave Andermatt for Goeschenen and proceed to 

Locarno. Visit the Madonna del Sasso, famous 

pilgrimage church and point of view. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 227 

6th Day. Steamer to Luino; rail to Ponte Tresa and then 

rail or steamer to Lugano. 
7th Day. Excursion to the San Salvatore or the Monte 

Generoso. 
8th Day. Excursion to Morcote a beauty spot on the lake 

or to Ligornetto with the famous Museum Vela. 
Enter Italy via Porlezza-Menaggio-Bellagio-Como. 

V. Entering at Geneva 

1st Day. Sightseeing at Geneva. 

2nd Day. Proceed by steamer to Montreux; then via Visp 
to Zermatt. 

3rd Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 

4th Day. Leave Zermatt via Visp-Brigue-Spiez for Inter- 
laken. 

Sth .Day. Visit one of the surrounding mountain heights or 
make the round trip Lauterbrunnen-Scheidegg- 
Jungfraujoch-Scheidegg-Grindelwald. 

6th Day. Proceed by steamer via Lake of Thun to Scherz- 
ligen ; then by rail to Berne. 

7th Day. Explore the City of Berne and leave towards eve- 
ning via Langnau for Lucerne. 

Sth Day. Excursion to one. of the surrounding mountain 
heights, which would also include a trip on the 
lake. 
Leave Switzerland by way of Basle, Schaffhausen, the 

Lake of Constance or Buchs for Western, Northern or 

Eastern Europe respectively, or via the St. Gothard for Italy. 

VI. Entering at Geneva 

1st Day. Sightseeing at Geneva. 

2nd Day. Proceed by steamer to Montreux; visit the Castle 
of Chillon in the afternoon. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAN. 

3rd Day. Leave Montreux via Zweisimmen-Spiez for Inter- 

laken. 
4th 'Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 
5th Day. Proceed via Briinig route to Lucerne, with a stop 

over at Meiringen for a visit to the gorge of 

the River Aar. 
6th Day. Excursion on the lake to Vitznau, then rail to Rigi- 

Kulm and proceed in the evening via Arth- 

Goldau to Zurich. 
7th Day. Sightseeing at Zurich and excursion to the Uetli- 

berg. 
8th Day. Proceed to Berne and explore the city. 

Leave Switzerland by -way of Pontarlier, Basle, Schaff- 
hausen, the Lake of Constance or Buchs for Western, North- 
ern or Eastern Europe respectively, or via Loetschberg- 
Simplon for Italy, or 

Proceed on 7th day to Locarno, with a visit to the Madonr.a 
del Sasso and proceed on the 8th day by steamer to Luino, 
then by rail to Ponte Tresa and then by rail or steamer to 
Lugano, leaving on the 9th day for Italy via Porlezza- 
Menaggio-Como. 

VII. Entering from Italy via Colico-Sondrio-Tirano 

1st Day. St. Moritz with a drive to Maloja, along the 
beautful Upper Engadine lakes. 

2nd Day. Visit one of the famous "Alps" renowned for 
their wonderful flora. 

3rd Day. Proceed via Filisur-Davos-Chur to Ragaz. Visit 
the Tamina Gorge. 

4th Day. Leave Ragaz for Glarus-Lmthal, make an excur- 
sion to Braunwald. 

5th Day. Leave Linthal by Post auto over the Klausen Pass 
to Altdorf and proceed to Fluelen-Lucerne. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 229 

6th Day. Sightseeing at Lucerne and an excursion on the 

lake. 
7th Day. Proceed via Langnau to Berne and explore the 

city. 
8th Day. Leave Berne for Lausanne, with an excursion to 

Vevey or Montreux. 

Leave via Vallorbe or via Geneva-Bellegarde for France, or 

Proceed on the third day to Chur only; on the 4th day to 

Disentis, and by Post auto-bus over the Oberalp Pass to 

Andermatt, and on the 5th day to Fliielen, thence by steamer 

to Lucerne. 

VIII. Entering from Italy via Menaggio-Porlezza 

1st Day. Lugano. Explore the city. 

2nd Day. Excursion to the San Salvatore or Monte 

Generoso. 
3rd Day. Proceed by rail (St. Gothard route) to Fliielen, 

then by steamer to Lucerne. 

4th Day. Excursion to one of the many surrounding moun- 
tain heights. 
5th Day. Proceed via Briinig route to Interlaken, with a 

stop over at Meiringen for a visit to the gorge 

of the River Aar. 
6th 'Day. Excursion to one of the many interesting points 

of view such as the Schynige Platte, Harder or 

the Jungfraujoch. 
7th Day. Leave by steamer for Spiez, then proceed by rail 

via Zweisimmen to Montreux. 
8th Day. Excursion to the Castle of Chillon and ascent of 

the Rochers de Naye. 

Leave via Lausanne-Vallorbe or Geneva-Bellegarde for 
France. 



230 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

SUGGESTIONS FOR TOURS OF 14 DAYS 
7. Entering at Basle 
1st Day. Leave for Neuhausen (Falls of the Rhine), then 

proceed to Zurich. 
2nd Day. Explore Zurich and proceed in the afternoon to 

Arth-Goldau and Rigi-Kulm. 

3rd Day. Descend to Vitznau; then steamer to Lucerne. 
4th Day. Excursion to the Pilatus, Stanserhorn or Biirgen- 

stock. 
5th Day. Proceed by steamer to Fliielen ; thence by rail via 

St. Gothard route to Lugano. 
6th Day. Excursion to the Monte San Salvatore or Monte 

Generoso. 
7th Day. Leave Lugano by steamer to Ponte Tresa; rail to 

Luino; thence steamer to Locarno. 

8th Day. Proceed from Locarno by steamer to Stresa, 
thence by rail via Simplon to Visp, branch off 
for Zermatt. 

9th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 
10th Day. Proceed via Visp-Brigue and Lotschberg route to 

Interlaken. 

llth Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 
heights such as Jungfrau, Schynige Platte, 
Harder, Miirren, etc. 

12th Day. Excursion by steamer on Lake of Thun to 
Scherzligen, thence by rail to Berne and return 
in the evening all rail to Interlaken. 
13th Day. Leave for Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux and visit 

the Castle of Chillon in the afternoon. 
14th Day. Trip by steamer to Lausanne or Geneva and 

return by rail to Montreux. 
Leave via Vallorbe for France. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 231 

//. Entering at Basle 

1st Day. Proceed via Brugg to Ziirich; explore the city. 
2nd Day. Proceed to Arth-Goldau and Rigi-Kulm; stay for 

sunset and sunrise. 

3rd Day. Proceed via Vitznau to Lucerne. 
4th Day, Excursion on the lake to Brunnen, drive through 

the famous Axenstrasse to Fliielen and return 

by steamer to Lucerne. 
5th Day.> Leave via Briinig route to Interlaken, with a stop 

over at Meiringen for a visit to the gorge of 

the River Aar. 
6th Day. Excursion on the Lake of Thun to Scherzligen; 

rail to Berne and return in the evening to 

Interlaken. 
7th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights; either to the Jungfrau, Schynige 

Platte or Harder. 
8th Day. Proceed to Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux, then by 

steamer to Geneva. 
9th Day. Sightseeing at Geneva in forenoon, then proceed 

by rail along Rhone Valley to Brig. 
10th Day. Proceed by rail to Gletsch (Rhone Glacier) ; 

thence by Post auto-bus to Andermatt. 
llth Day. Leave for Goeschenen and proceed via St. 

Gothard to Locarno; visit the Madonna del 

Sasso, famous pilgrimage church and point of 

view. 
12th Day. Proceed by steamer to Luino, rail to Ponte Tresa 

and by steamer to Lugano. 
13th Day. Excursion to the San Salvatore or Monte 

Generoso. 
14th Day. Excursion to Morcote, a beauty spot on the lake, 

or to Ligornetto, with the famous Museum 

Vela. 



232 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Leave for Italy via Porlezza-Menaggio-Como. 

111. Entering at Basle 

1st Day. Proceed via Olten to Lucerne; explore the city. 
2nd Day. Trip on the lake to Fliielen and proceed from 
Vitznau by rail to Rigi-Kulm. Spend night 
there for sunset and sunrise. 
3rd Day. Proceed via Arth-Goldau to Zurich; explore the 

city. 
4th Day. Proceed via Thalwil-Landquart-Davos to St. 

Moritz. 

5th Day. Visit one of the beautiful Alps in the vicinity, 
famous for their wonderful flora, or drive to 
Maloja along the Upper Engadine lakes. 
6th Day. Make an excursion to Muottas-Muraigl or to Alp 

Griim on the Bernina Railroad. 

7th Day. Leave St. Moritz via Thusis and Reichenau for 
Disentis, then drive by Post auto-bus over 
Oberalp Pass to Andermatt. 
8th Day. Proceed by Post auto-bus to Gletsch (Rhone 

Glacier) and by rail to Brig. 
9th Day. Proceed by rail to Visp and Zermatt, then make 

an excursion to the Gornergrat. 
10th Day. Proceed from Zermatt via Brig and Lotschberg 

route to Interlaken. 
llth Day. Excursion to any of the many surrounding 

mountain heights, Jungfraujoch, etc. 
12th Day. Leave by steamer to Spiez; then rail via Zweis- 

immen to Montreux. 
13th Day. Excursion to the Rochers de Naye, or to the 

Gruyeres Valley. 
14th Day. Proceed either to Lausanne or Geneva. 

Leave either via Vallorbe or Bellegarde for France or via 
Simplon for Italy. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 233 

IV. Entering at Geneva 
1st Day. Explore the city in the forenoon and make an 

excursion to the Saleve in the afternoon. 
2nd Day. Proceed by steamer via Lausanne to Montreux; 

visit the Castle of Chillon in the afternoon. 
If entering at Lausanne, the first day could be 
devoted to this city and immediate environs, 
making a visit to Geneva on the second day. 
3rd Day. Proceed from Montreux or Lausanne to Visp- 
Zermatt. Explore the village and some point 
of interest in the environs in the afternoon. 
4th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 
5th Day. Zermatt-Visp-Brig via Lotschberg route to Spiez, 

steamer to Interlaken. 

6th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights, such as the Harder or Schynige Platte. 

7th Day. Round trip via Lauterbrunnen-Scheidegg-Jung- 

fraujoch-Scheidegg-Grindelwald. 

8th Day. Interlaken-Meiringen, visit the gorge of the River 
Aar and proceed in the afternoon via Post 
auto-bus over the Grimsel Pass to Gletsch 
(Rhone Glacier). 

9th Day. Gletsch-Post auto-bus over the Furka Pass to 
Andermatt rail to Goschenen-Fluelen and 
steamer to Lucerne. 

10th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountains, 
llth Day. Lucerne-Thalwil Chur, spending the afternoon in 

the quaint capital of the Grisons. 

12th Day. Excursion to Arosa, Davos, Flims or Disentis. 
13th Day. Proceed via Thusis, where the famous Via 

Mala Gorge should be visited, to St Moritz 
14th Day. Drive along the Upper Engadme lakes to Maloja, 
or visit one of the many delightful "Alps" in 
this vicinity. 



234 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



Leave via the Bernina Railroad for Tirano-Colico-Como, 
proceed from Tirano to Bormio and over the Stelvio to 
Trafoi, or leave Switzerland via the picturesque Lower 
Engadine. 

V. Entering at Lugano 
1st Day. Explore this interesting city and some of its 

beautiful surroundings. 
2nd Day. Make an excursion to the San Salvatore or Monte 

Generoso. 
3rd Day. Lugano- Ponte Tresa-Luino then steamer on the 

Lake Maggiore to Locarno. Visit the Madonna 

del Sasso. 

4th Day. Excursion into the famous Maggia Valley. 
5th Day. Locarno-Bellinzona-St. Gothard route to Fliielen, 

steamer to Lucerne. 
6th Day. A trip to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

7th Day* Excursion to Zurich. 
8th Day, Lucerne-Briinig route to Meiringen, visit the 

gorge of the River Aar and proceed to Inter- 

laken. 
9th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights or make the famous round trip Lauter- 

brunner - Scheidegg Jungfraujoch . Scheidegg - 

Grindelwald. 
10th Day* Excursion to Kandersteg, thus taking in a portion 

of the famous Lotschberg Railway, 
llth Day. Proceed by steamer on the Lake of Thun to 

Scherzligen, and by rail to Berne/ Explore the 

city in the afternoon. 
12th Day. Berne-Spiez-Zweisimmen-Montreux, Visit the 

Castle of Chillon in the afternoon, 
13th Day. Proceed by steamer via Lausanne to Geneva* 






HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 235 

14th Day. Explore Geneva and vicinity. 
Leave for France. 

VI. Entering at St. Moritz (from Chiavenna or Tirano, 

Italy) 
1st Day. Visit one of the many delightful "Alps" in this 

vicinity. 

2nd Day. Drive along the Upper Engadine lakes to Maloja. 
3rd Day. Visit to Vulpera-Tarasp in the Lower Engadine. 
4th Day. St. Moritz-Thusis-Reichenau-Disentis with a 
drive by Post auto-bus over the Oberalp Pass, 
to Andermatt. 
5th Day. Andermatt rail to Fliielen steamer to Lucerne; 

explore the city in the afternoon. 
6th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

7th Day. Lucerne via Briinig route to Meiringen, visit the 
gorge of the River Aar and proceed to Inter- 
laken. 

8th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 
heights or round trip Lauterbrunnen-Schei- 
degg-Jungfraujoch-Scheidegg-Grindelwald. 
9th Day. Proceed via Spiez to Kandersteg and visit the 

famous Oeschinen Lake. 
10th Day. Kandersteg to Brig-Montreux. 
llth Day. Excursion to the famous Gruyeres district. 
12th Day. Excursion to Champery. 
13th Day. Visit to Vevey and Lausanne. 
14th Day. Proceed via steamer to Geneva and explore the 

city in the afternoon. 
Leave for France. 



236 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

SUGGESTIONS FOR TOURS OF 21 DAYS 
7. Entering at Basle 

1st 'Day. Explore the interesting City of Basle in the fore- 
noon and proceed in the afternoon to Zurich. 
2nd Day. Explore the city in the morning and take a trip 

to the Uetliberg in the afternoon. 

3rd Day. Make an excursion to the Falls of the Rhine. 
4th Day. Make a trip on the Lake of Zurich as far as 
Rapperswil, then proceed by rail via Glarus to 
Linthal. 
5th Day. Visit Braunwald of some other point of interest 

in this vicinity. 
6th Day. Proceed by Post auto-bus over the Klausen Pass 

to Altdorf, train to Lucerne. 
7th Day. Explore the City of Lucerne. 
8th Day. Make a trip on the lake, including a walk or drive 

on the famous Axenstrasse. 
9th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

10th Day. Excursion to Engelberg. 

llth 'Day. Proceed from Lucerne via the Briinig route to 
Meiringen, visit the gorge of the River Aar 
and proceed to Interlaken. 

12th Day. Excursion to the Harder or Schynige Platte. 
13th Day. Round trip Lanterbrunnen-Scheidegg-Jungfrau- 

Joch-Scheidegg-Grindelwald. 

14th Day. Trip on the Lake of Thun to Scherzligen, proceed 
to Berne and return in the evening by rail to 
Interlaken. 
15th Day. Interlaken- Spiez-Kandersteg. Visit the famous 

Oeschinen Lake. 

16th Day. Make an excursion via Goppenstein into the 
puaint Lotschen Valley. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 237 

17th Day. Kandersteg-Brig-Visp-Zermatt. Make a trip to 
one of the different points of interest in the 
afternoon. 

18tb Day. Make an excursion to the Gornergrat. 

19th Day. Zermatt-Visp-Martigny-Montreux. Visit the 
Castle of Chillon in the afternoon. 

20th Day. Visit Vevey anH Lausanne. 

21st Day. Proceed by steamer to Geneva. 
Leave for France, 

77. Entering at Lausanne or Geneva 
1st Day. Explore either city which you may have chosen 

for your starting point. 

2nd Day, Make a trip on the Lake of Geneva. 
3rd Day. Proceed by rail to Montreux; visit the Castle of 

Chillon and the Rocher? de Naye. 

4th Day. Excursion into the picturesque Gruyeres Valley. 
5th Day. Proceed via Visp to Zermatt. 
6th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 
7th Day. Zermatt-Visp-Brig, then Furka Railway to Gletsch 

(Rhone Glacier). 

8th Day. Proceed by Post auto-bus over the Grimsel Pass 
to Meiringen. visit the gorge of the River Aar 
and proceed to Interlaken. 
9th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

10th Day. Round trip to Jungfraujoch. 
llth Day. Proceed from Interlaken via the Lake of Thun to 

Berne. 

12th Day. Excursion to the Lakes of Morat and Neuchatel. 
13th Day. Proceed to Lucerne and explore the city in the 

afternoon. 

14th Day. Excursion on the Lake of Lucerne. 
15th Day. Visit to one of the surrounding mountain heights. 



238 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

16th Day. Proceed from Lucerne via Thalwil to Chur: 
explore this quaint capital of the Grisons in the 
afternoon. 

17th Day. Excursion to Arosa, Davos, Flims or Disentis< 

18th Day. Chur-Thusis- ( Visit the Via Mala Gorge) -St. 
Moritz. 

19th Day. Visit one of the "Alps" in this vicinity, 

20th Day. Drive along the Upper Engadine lakes to Maloja. 

21st Day. Visit to Vulpera-Tarasp in the Lower Engadine. 
Proceed by the Bernina Railroad to Tirano-Colico-Como, or 

proceed from Tirano to Bormio and over the Stelvio to Trafoi 

and Meran. 

777. Entering Switzerland at Lugano (via Chiasso, or the 
Lake of Como, Italy). 

1st Day. Explore Lugano and immediate vicinity. 

2nd Day. Excursion to the San Salvatore or Monte 
Generoso. 

3rd Day. Proceed from Lugano via Ponte Tresa-Luino to 
Locarno. Visit the Madonna del Sasso. 

4th Day. Excursion into the romantic Maggia Valley. 

5th Day. Proceed from Locarno by steamer to Stresa, then 
by rail via Simplon route to Visp, then to 
Zermatt. 

6th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 

7th Day. Some other excursion in the environs of Zermatt 
in the forenoon, proceed in the afternoon via 
Visp to Martigny. 

8th Day. Excursion to the Great St. Bernard Hospice. 

9th Day. Proceed in the morning from Martigny to Mon- 
treux, visit the Castle of Chillon in the fore- 
noon and take an afternoon steamer to Geneva. 
10th Day. Geneva. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 239 

llth Day. Proceed from Geneva via Lausanne to Montreux, 

then take the electric railway via Zweisimmen 

to Spiez and Interlaken. 
12th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

13th Day. Excursion to the Jungf rauj och. 
14th Day. Trip on the Lake of Thun with a visit ti Berne. 
15th Day. Proceed via the Lake of Brienz to Meiringen, 

thence by Post auto-bus over the Grimsel to 

Gletsch. 
16th Day. Proceed from Gletsch by Post auto-bus to Ander- 

matt, thence by rail to Fliielen and steamer to 

Lucerne. 
17th Day. A visit to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

18th Day. Excursion to Engelberg. 
19th Day. Proceed via the Lake of Zug to Zurich, exploring 

that city in the afternoon. 
20th Day. Excursion to the Uetliberg or on the Lake of 

Zurich to Rapperswil. 

21st Day. Proceed via the Falls of the Rhine to Basle. 
Leave Switzerland for France or Northern Europe. 

IV. Entering at St. Merits (From Chiavenna or Tirano, 

Italy) 

1st Day. Visit one of the delightful "Alps" in the vicinity. 
2nd Day. Drive to Maloja, along the Upper Engadine lakes. 
3rd Day, Excursion to Muottas Muraigl. 
4th Day. Excursion to Vulpera-Tarasp, 
5th Day. St. Montz-Filisur-Davos-Landquart-Linthal. 
6th Day. Excursion to Braunwald or some other point of 

interest. 
7th Day. Proceed by Post auto-bus over the Klausen Pass 

to Altdorf, thence by rail to Lucerne. 



240 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

8th Day. Trip on the Lake of Lucerne, including a walk or 

drive on the famous Axenstrasse. 

9th Day. Visit one of the surrounding mountain heights. 
10th Day. Excursion to Engelberg. 
llth Day. Lucerne via Briinig route to Meiringen, visit the 

gorge of the River Aar and proceed to Inter- 

laken. 

12th Day. Excursion to the Harder or Schynige Platte. 
13th Day. Excursion to the Junfraujoch. 
14th Day. Trip on the Lake of Thun, then proceed by rail 

to Berne. Explore the city in the afternoon. 
15th Day. Excursion to the Lakes of Morat and Neuchatel. 
16th Day. Proceed from Berne via Kandersteg to Brig, 

thence to Visp and Zermatt. 
17th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 
18th Day. Zermatt- Visp-Montreux ; visit the Castle of 

Chillon. 
19th Day. Excursion into the picturesque Gruyeres Valley or 

excursion to Champery. 
20th Day. Visit to Vevey and Lausanne. 
21st Day. Proceed by steamer to Geneva, exploring the city 

in the afternoon. 
Proceed to France. 

SUGGESTIONS FOR TOURS OF 30 DAYS 

I. Entering at Basle 
1st Day. Explore this interesting city and proceed for the 

evening to the Falls of the Rhine. 
2nd Day. Sightseeing at Schaffhausen, proceeding later in 

the day to Zurich. 

3rd Day. Excursion to the Uetliberg. 
4th Day. Excursion on the Lake of Zurich as far as 

Rapperswil. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 241 

5th Day Excursion to Baden and nearby Brugg and 

Vindonissa (interesting Roman amphitheatre). 
6th Day. Ziirich-Glarus with a visit to the famous Klontal. 
7th Day. Proceed to Linthal and visit one of the many 

points of interest in that vicinity. 
8th Day. Excursion to Braunwald. 
9th Day. Proceed by Post auto-bus to Altdorf, thence by 

rail to Lucerne. 
10th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

llth Day. Excursion to Engelberg. 

12th Day. Another excursion in the environs of Lucerne. 
13th Day. Excursion to the picturesque Lake of Zug or into 

the so-called Seetal, where a visit to the 

Castles of Hallwil or Lenzburg should be 

included. 
14th Day. Proceed from Lucerne via the Briinig route to 

Meiringen, visit the gorge of the River Aar and 

proceed to Interlaken. 

15th Day. Excursion to the Harder or Schynige Platte. 
16th Day. Excursion to the Jungfraujoch. 
17th Day. Excursion to Miirren. 

18th Day. Excursion to Brienz, the woodcarvers' village. 
19th Day. Proceed via the Lake of Thun to Berne. 
20th Day. Excursion to the Lakes of Morit and Neuchatel. 
21st Day. Excursion to ancient Soleure, or some other point 

in the Jura. 

22nd Day. Excursion to Fribourg and the Gruyeres district. 
23rd Day. Excursion into the quaint Emmental. 
24th Day. Proceed from Berne via Spiez to Frutigen, thence 

to Adelfooden. 

25lh Day. Explore some of the picturesque environs. 
26th Day. Proceed from Adelboden via Frutigen to Kander- 

steg and visit the Oeschinen Lake. 



242 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



27th Day. Excursion from Kandersteg via Goppenstein to 
the interesting Lotschen Valley. 

28th Day. Proceed from Kandersteg via Spiez and Zweis- 
immen to Montreux. 

29th Day. Visit Vevey and Lausanne. 

30th Day. Excursion to Geneva. 
Leave for -France via Lausanne-Vallorbe, or Geneva-Belle- 

garde, or for Italy via the Simplon route. 

II. Entering at Lausanne 
1st Day. Explore this interesting city. 
2nd Day. Make an excursion to Geneva. 
3rd Day. Make an excursion to the Lakes of Neuchatel 

and Morat. 
4th Day. Visit Vevey and Montreux, including the Castle 

of Chi 11 on. 
5th Day. Excursion to the Gruyeres district. 

If Switzerland is entered at Geneva, the same 

programme can be followed, the second day 

being devoted to a special excursion to 

Lausanne. 

6th Day. Proceed to Champery, exploring some of the 

environs in the afternoon. 
7th Day. Some other excursion in the environs of 

Champery. 

8th Day. Proceed via Martigny to Visp and Zermatt. 
9th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 

10th Day. Some other excursion in the environs of Zermatt. 
llth Day. Zermatt- Visp-Brig, Post auto-bus to Gletsch 

(Rhone Glacier). 

12th Day. Proceed from Gletsch via Post auto-bus to 
Meiringen, thence by rail and steamer to 
Interlaken. 
13th Day. Excursion to the Harder or Schynige Platte. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 243 

14th Day. Excursion to the Jungfraujoch. 

15th Day. Excursion to Adelboden or Kandersteg. 

16th Day. Excursion on the Lake of Thun including a visit 

to the Beatus Caves. 
17th Day. Proceed to Berne and explore the city in the 

afternoon. 
18th Day. Excursion to some point of interest in the 

environs of Berne. 

19th Day. Proceed from Berne to Lucerne. 
20th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 

heights. 

21st Day. Excursion via the Lake of Zug to Zurich. 
22nd Day. Excursion on the Lake of Lucerne, including a 

drive or walk on the famous Axenstrasse. 
23rd Day. Excursion to Engelberg. 
24th Day. Proceed from Lucerne by rail to Andermatt, 

thence by Post auto-bus to Disentis. 

25th Day. Proceed via Reichenau and Thusis to St. Moritz. 
26th Day. Drive to Maloja along the Upper Engadine lakes. 
27th Day. Visit one of the delightful "Alps" in this neigh- 
borhood. 

28th Day. Excursion to Vulpera-Tarasp. 
29th Day. Excursion to Pontresina and environs. 
30th Day. Some other excursion in this district. 

Leave via the Bernina Railroad for Tirano-Colico-Como, or 
proceed from Tirano to Bormio and over the Stelvio to 
Trafoi, or leave Switzerland via the picturesque Lower 
Engadine. 

///. Entering at Lugano (From Chiasso or the Lake of 

Como, Italy) 

1st Day. Explore this interesting city. 

2nd Day. Excursion to the San Salvatore or Monte 
Generoso. 



244 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

3rd Day. Excursion to Ligornetto, cr some point of interest 

on the Lake of Lugano. 
4th 'Day. Proceed via Ponte Tresa-Luino to Locarno; visit 

the Madonna del Sasso. 

5th Day. Excursion into the picturesque Maggia Valley. 
6th Day. Proceed via Bellinzona and the St. Gothard route 

to Goeschenen, thence to Andermatt. 
7th Day. Proceed in the afternoon by Post auto-bus to 

Gletsch (Rhone Glacier). 
8th Day. Proceed by the Furka Railway to Brig, thence to 

Visp and Zermatt. 

9th Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 

10th Day. Some other excursion in the environs of Zermatt. 
llth Day. Proceed via Visp and Martigny to Montreux; 

visit the Castle of Chilian. 
12th Day. Visit to Vevey and Lausanne. 
13th Day. Visit to Geneva. 
14th Day. Visit to the Gruyeres district. 
15th Day. Visit to Champery or Villars in the Rhone Valley. 
16th Day. Proceed via Zweisimmen to Spiez and Inter- 

laken. 

17th Day. Excursion to the Harder or Schynige Platte. 
18th Day. Excursion to the Jungfraujoch. 
19th Day. Excursion on the Lake of Thun. 
20th Day. Visit to Berne. 
21st Day. Proceed via Meiringen to Lucerne; explore the 

city in the afternoon. 

22nd Day. Visit to one of the surrounding mountain heights. 
23rd Day. Excursion on the Lake of Lucerne, including a 

walk or drive on the Axenstrasse. 
24th Day. Excursion to Engelberg. 
25th Day. Excursion to Zug and Ziirich. 
26th Day. Proceed by rail to Altdorf, thence by Post auto- 
bus over the Klausen Pass to IJnthal. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 245 

27th Day. Excursion to Braunwald. 

28th Day. Some other excursion in this vicinity. 

29th Day. Proceed via Rapperswil and Winterthur to 
Schaffhausen-Neuhausen ; Falls of the Rhine. 

30th Day. Proceed to Basle, devoting the day to that inter- 
esting city. 
Leave for France or Northern Europe. 

IV. Entering at St. Moritz (From Chiavenna or Tirano, 

Italy) 

1st Day. Visit one of the interesting "Alps" in the vicinity. 
2nd Day. Drive to Maloja along the Upper Engadine lakes. 
3rd 'Day. Visit to Pontresina and one of the nearby 

glaciers. 

4th Day. Excursion to the Muottas Muraigl. 
5th Day. Visit to Vulpera-Tarasp. 
6th .Day. Proceed via Thusis to Disentis. 
7th Day. Proceed by Post auto-bus to Andermatt. 
8th Day. Proceed by Post auto-bus to Gletsch (Rhone 

Glacier), then by the Furka Railway to Brig. 
9th Day. Make an excursion to the picturesque Lotschen 

Valley. 

10th Day. Proceed from Brig via Visp to Zermatt. 
llth Day. Excursion to the Gornergrat. 
12th Day. Some other excursion in the environs of Zermatt. 
13th Day. Proceed via Visp to Montreux with a visit to the 

Castle of Chillon. 
14th Day. Excursion to Geneva. 
15th Day. Excursion to Lausanne. 

16th Day. Another excursion in the vicinity of Montreux. 
17th Day. Excursion to the picturesque Gruyeres district. 
1 8th Day. Proceed to Berne, exploring the city in the after- 
noon. 
19th Day. Excursion in the environs of Berne. 



246 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

20th Day. Proceed via the Lake of Thun to Interlaken. 

21st Day. Excursion to the Harder or Schynige Platte. 

22nd Day. Excursion to the Jungfraujoch. 

23rd Day. Excursion to Adelboden, Kandersteg or Kienthai. 

24th Day. Some other excursion in the environs of Inter- 
laken. 

25th Day. Proceed from Interlaken via the Briinig route to 
Lucerne; explore the city in the afternoon. 

26th Day. Excursion on the Lake of Lucerne, with a walk 
or drive on the Axenstrasse. 

27th Day. Excursion to one of the surrounding mountain 
heights. 

28th Day. Excursion to Engelberg. 

29th Day. Excursion to Zug and Zurich. 

30th Day. Proceed to Schaffhausen or Basle, exploring 

either of these cities in the afternoon. 
Leave for Northern Europe or France. 

OBSERVATION In order that a tourist may avail himself when- 
ever feasible of the reduced "pension rates" granted by 
the hotels for a stay lasting at least five days, the itine- 
raries of longer duration have been made up accordingly. 



QUAINT CUSTOMS AND FESTIVALS 

AS the study and knowledge of the various legends of 
Switzerland afford us an opportunity to obtain a closer 
insight into the beliefs and character of her people, so will 
an intimate understanding of the manifold customs which are 
still prevalent throughout the country bring us nearer to the 
heart of the natives. 

Glancing over the pages of Swiss history we find that the little 
Alpine Republic has passed through many stages. It was first 
peopled by the Rhaeti and the Helvetii of Celtic origin, then 
in succession the Romans, the Alemanni, Burgundians and 
Franks swept through the country or parts thereof. Later in 
the 13th Century the heroic struggle of the Forest Cantons 
started against Austrian tyranny and numerous revolts against 
foreign oppression were carried out victoriously. The 
Reformation and interior political feuds contributed in their 
turn to fill the pages of Swiss history and the anniversary of 
many noteworthy incidents and famous battles which have 
taken place in the course of bygone centuries, have ever since 
been commemorated by an appropriate celebration. Then in 
private life the perpetual change of the seasons, for instance, 
as well as the different Christian holidays have in their turn 
furnished occasions for ceremonies and festivals and a major- 
ity of these old-time customs, of which I will just describe a. 
few, are still transmitted from generation to generation. 

One of the most glorious battles in Swiss history is undoubt- 
edly the one of Sempach, on July 9, 1386, which is celebrated 
yearly on the first Monday after St. Ulrich's Day. In the 
forenoon a well organized procession in which delegates of 

247 



248 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

the government, the clergy, students and citizens of Sempach 
all take part, winds its way up to the battlefield. All gather 
near the so-called Winkelried-Stone, a memorial erected in 
honor of the hero of Sempach, and a government official 
makes a speech. After this the participants enter the old 
chapel on the battlefield, where the historical documents 
relating to the battle are first of all read to the audience. 
Then follows a regular religious service, with sermon, high 
mass and a procession. A number of masses are moreover 
said on that day for the repose of the souls of the fallen 
soldiers. At the conclusion of this celebration in the chapel 
the people return to Sempach and the remainder of the day 
is spent in a pleasant social reunion with banquet, speeches 
and musical offerings. 

The memory of the wonderful victory at Nafels, in the 
Canton of Glarus, of 600 men of Glarus against a force of 
between five and six thousand Austrians, on April 9, 1388, is 
also honored every year on the first Thursday in April. The 
celebration is known as the Nafelserfahrt the pilgrimage to 
Nafels and consists first of all of a procession which makes 
a halt before every one of the eleven memorial stones, indi- 
cating the spots where the eleven unsuccessful attacks were 
made by the enemy. After this follow, same as at Sempach, 
the reading of the historic account of the battle, a sermon, 
some hymns and a solemn mass. 

The "Landsgemeinden," as we still find them in Appenzell 
(Inner- and Ausser-Rhoden), in Glarus, Nidwalden, Obwalden 
and Uri, are held on the last Sunday in April, or on the first 
Sunday in May. It is an open-air meeting of all the burghers 
of the canton during which the democratic principle in its 
purest form is seen at work, the right of initiative as well as 
that of the referendum finding in it at one and the same time 
their natural expression. It is the task of the Landsgemeinde 
to elect the cantonal government and certain officials, and 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 249 

the Landsgemeinde also takes charge of the fiscal matters of 
the canton and its legislature in general. 

The Landsgemeinde of Glarus is one of the most striking 
of all as regard's some of its features. In the morning the 
cantonal authorities march from the ancient Rathaus to the 
place of meeting, preceded by a detachment of soldiers and a 
band which plays a peculiar slow march. Another military 
detachment follows behind these officials and two bailiffs, clad 
in rich purple, carry the mighty sword of the canton and the 
seal of state. The people themselves journey without any 
formality directly to the meeting place. As soon as the 
authorities have entered "the ring," whose origin dates back 
to Alemannic days, the burghers begin to occupy their places. 
As at other Landsgemeinden, the women and children are 
privileged to attend, but in Glarus they are given the place of 
honor, being seated in the very front of the assembly. 

A platform has been erected for the government officials 
arid from here the Landammann or President directs the 
meeting. The elections are decided by a holding up of the 
right hand and if the result is not apparent at once, the voters 
are asked to again hold up their hands, until a good majority 
can be easily determined. 

The Landsgemeinde of Appenzell Ausser-Rhoden is held at 
Hundwil and the one of Appenzell Inner-Rhoden takes place 
at Appenzell, which latter city puts on quite a festive appear- 
ance for the occasion. The women are mostly dressed in their 
picturesque national garb and the youngsters consider Lands- 
gemeinde Sunday the gala day of the year. 

At Appenzell too there is a procession of the cantonal 
officials, headed by the Landammann and two state function- 
aries carrying halberds. All except the bailiff, who is dressed 
in the colors of the canton, half black and half white, are 
clothed in long black gowns. On one side of the square a-e 
two platforms; the higher one accommodating the state 



250 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

officials and the lower one the judges of the cantonal court. 
The people gather in front of these platforms, all dressed in 
their black Sunday best with a few of the younger set in the 
attractive cantonal garb and all wearing by their side an old 
sword or saber, as a sign of their honorable and free citizen- 
ship. 

With heads uncovered they stand reverently while the 
Landammann opens the day's proceedings with a speech, deal- 
ing with matters most important for the day. After conclu- 
sion of his discourse he lays down the seal of state and 
descends from the platform, whereupon the cantonal secretary 
asks the assembly to choose a successor. The re-election or 
the election of a new man for each office now takes place and 
when the assembly is brought to a close, the people renew their 
oath of fidelity to the state which in every Landsgemeinde is 
one of the most solemn and impressing acts. 

The Landssremeinde of Uri takes place in a meadow at 
Schaddorf, near Altdorf, the latter being the starting point 
of the procession which is similar to the one at Glarus. In 
this case, however, the standard of Uri is carried conspicu- 
ously in the forefront of the procession and it is escorted by 
two men in mediaeval costume, bearing the two bull's horns, 
which are the insignia and symbol of Uri sovereignty. The 
meeting itself is transacted on the same basis as in the other 
Landsgemeinde cantons. 

The two half cantons of Unterwalden, Obwalden and Nid- 
walden, hold their Landsgemeinde at Sarnen and Stans 
respectively. No special feature distinguishes them from the 
meetings in the other above mentioned cantons. 

The origin of the curious custom of Chalanda Marz in the 
Upper Engadine, which is meant to be a welcome greeting 
to the approaching spring, dates back to those early days 
when this part of the Grisons was under Roman influence. 
On the first of March the youngsters rise with the 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 251 

sun and ere long the bigger boys begin to march through 
the village, swinging .heavy cowbells with all their might. 
This is the signal for their younger playmates to make 
themselves ready and immediately after breakfast all the boys 
assemble in the village square. Each of 4hem carries a bell 
on his neck and presently they begin their merry march from 
house to house. The tallest boy marches in front as the 
leader; he is meant to represent the Swiss cow-keeper and in 
this capacity he warbles many a j ,melodious*yodel-song into the 
cool morning air. His costume consists of black breeches, 
white stockings, old-fashioned shoes and a formidable-looking 
cap, not to forget the scrupulously clean milking pail which he 
carries proudly on his broad shoulder. His companions, all 
carrying weapons, follow in a long row, their joyous songs 
forming a harmonious accompaniment to the tinkling of the 
numerous bells. Another tall boy marches at the end of the 
procession. He, in the role of herdsman, carries a long stick 
in his hand and an old, big hat on his head. He pretends to 
be anxiously looking around for the cows entrusted to his care. 

Wherever this joyous crowd of boys knocks at a door, it is 
bound to receive a hearty welcome. Sausages, pies, cakes, 
apples, nuts and other dainties coveted by the average country 
lad are liberally presented to them and a one or two franc 
piece is often slipped into the hands of these juvenile merry- 
makers. After they have thus "visited" every resident of 
their commune, the boys ask the 'girls to join them and some- 
where in the house of some good-natured folks who delight in 
listening to the outbursts of youthful happiness, the banquet 
takes place. But the older generation also celebrates the day 
in a befitting manner and many a glass of the renowned Velt- 
liner wine is emptied in honor of the approaching spring. 

Towards the end of April the passing of winter and the 
arrival of spring is celebrated at Zurich with a very pretty 
festival known "as the Sechselauten six o'clock ringing 



252 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

feast as the actual ceremony takes place at the striking of 
6 P. M. when the bells ring for the working day to close, which 
during the winter only finishes at 7 P. M. 

A huge figure, known as the Boogg, made of wood and 
covered with white cotton wool, represents winter. In due 
consideration of its fate to be fulfilled in the evening, it is 
stuffed with crackers and gunpowder. 

In the morning a procession of over 1,000 school children, 
many of whom are dressed in the picturesque Swiss national 
garb, escorts the triumphal float bearing the Goddess of 
Spring with her attendant maidens. Behind follows the 
Boogg, surrounded by dancing and jeering clowns. The pro- 
cession winds its way along the river Limmat to the head of 
the placid lake, where Boogg is left behind on the spacious 
square, to be raised on poles, in order that a bonfire may be 
built around him. The forenoon festivities close with a 
juvenile ball in the Townhalle. 

In the afternoon the various guilds, all attired in wonderful 
ancient costumes, have their parade. These guilds, which in 
former centuries used to play such an important role, are no 
longer the strict unions of the same class of artisans those 
unions died out in 1798. The members of the guilds of to-day 
may in reality belong to quite a different profession, but they 
may have chosen to select the symbol of the trade once prac- 
ticed by their forefathers. Several of these guilds still meet 
in their respective guild-houses, others have their reunions in 
various inns or hotels, but all are anxious to participate in a 
dignified manner in the afternoon Sechselauten parade. 

The first stroke of six is the signal for Boogg's execution. 
He is set on fire and while he is expiating his wrongdoings 
other bonfires flare up on the surrounding mountain heights 
and fireworks are sent off from the numerous boats now gaily 
circling around the lovely lake. Winter has passed and the 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 253 

arrival of spring is celebrated far into the stillness of the 
night. 

Some of the prettiest spring festivals are, of course, con- 
nected with Easter. Easter is primarily an important holiday 
in the Christian calendar, but its advent also calls for certain 
quaint usages which have no connection whatsoever with the 
Bible. Of these customs the so-called "Eierauflesen," the 
gathering up of eggs, is one of the most noteworthy. It is 
of Alemannic origin and consists of a competition between two 
parties of which one has to throw a certain number of eggs 
into a peculiarly shaped flat basket, while the other party has 
to cover an indicated distance on foot or on horseback. The 
man who has accomplished his task first is the winner and 
the loser has either to pay for the eggs or some drinks. 

Ascension Day is a particular favorite with the natives for 
sunrise excursions to mountains. The residents of Zurich 
thus journey to the nearby Uetliberg, the people of Aarau and 
environs to the Gislifluh, the Bernese to the Gurten, etc. 

Whit-Sunday also is a great day for outings. In the Lower 
Engadine the young people enjoy a dance on the soft green 
meadows. In a part of the Canton of Zurich the farmers 
present the poor with milk, believing that their milk produc- 
tion would, through this gift, be blessed for the year. 

In the mountain regions, the start of the cattle to the sum- 
mer pastures, the so-called Alpaufzug, is always a festive 
event. Interlaken for instance has been making a particular 
feature of this day which means so much to the herdsmen and 
their families and on which occasion the cattle even seem to 
realize the important change which is about to gladden their 
lives. 

The king of the Alpine procession, a handsome, powerful 
bull, marches in front. He is decorated with beautiful gar- 
lands of flowers and with the airs of a monarch he carries the 
one-legged milking-stool, which is also wreathed with spring 



254 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

blossoms. In a long row the -cows now follow their 
leader, all well kept and scrupulously clean and every one 
embellished with flowers and a merry tinkling cowbell. At 
their sides walk their keepers in Sunday attire, now and then 
fondly eyeing their proteges. 

Following the procession of cattle comes a parade of car- 
riages and vehicles of varied description, containing the 
women-folk and children of the herdsmen, also articles of 
furniture and dairying utensils piled high. This is the 
departure for the Alps, a most characteristic and picturesque 
sight in the mountainous regions. 

A very antiquated custom of nocturnal wooing, which is, 
however, gradually dying out, is the Kiltgang. In many 
districts of the Canton of Berne the younger set of the male 
inhabitants form a kind of vigilance committee to prevent the 
well-to-do girls from being carried off by outsiders. The 
lovers in the village who are of this set are permitted to pay 
their visits and climb to the windows of the fair ones undis- 
turbed, while strenuous opposition is given to strangers who 
venture to intrude. 

Closely connected with the Kiltgang is the so-called Maien- 
stecken of the Canton of Lucerne. A lover, anxious to please 
his dearest, plants in front of her window a small pine tree, 
adorned with ribbons. This is supposed to be the expression 
of utmost devotion, and it generally finds its reward in a 
generous entertainment at the hands of both the parents and 
the girl. 

Another method of wooing in the flower language still 
exists in remote villages of the Canton of Glarus. In this case 
the young man places a flower pot containing a single rose 
and a note on the window sill of the girl's room when she is 
absent from home. He then has to patiently wait for a reply. 

If the maid takes the rose, the young man boldly enters the 
house to arrange matters with her parents, but if the rose 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 255 

is allowed to fade away the proposal is rejected without a 
single word having been exchanged between the couple. 

There is not one single part in Switzerland which has not 
some peculiar usage of its own. To the casual onlooker they 
may appear ridiculous at first, but on closer examination of 
such old-time traditions we frequently discover that their 
origin is actually connected with historic events, and what may 
have struck us as "somewhat queer" at first is explained by 
the fact that the majority of these ancient customs were born 
in a period when the world did not radiate the enlightenment 
of our modern days. 



SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL LIFE 

SWITZERLAND is classical ground for everything con- 
nected with education and schools. 

Switzerland is classical ground for everything connected 
with education and schools. 

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, born in 1712 in the City of Geneva, 
presented the world with new ideas on education in his book 
"Emile." He was of the opinion that the development of the 
individual reflects the evolution of the entire species and asked 
therefore that the principles of education should conform 
themselves to the general upward trend of humanity. Accord- 
ing to Rousseau the attention of the educator should first be 
centered exclusively on the development of the body and the 
senses of the child; a systematical training of the intellect 
would then follow, but the object of the same would be more 
a building up of character and power of judgment than a mere 
instilling of knowledge. 

Heinrich Pestalozzi, born in 1746, Zurich's great philanthrop 
and pedagogue, realized the greatness of Rousseau's teachings 
and utilized them in a practical way for the public schools. 
His writings and the educational establishments he directed at 
Neuhof-Birr (Argovie) from 1775-80 and at Yverdon, Can- 
ton of Vaud, from 1805-25, became world-famous, although 
the latter never prospered in a financial way. Pestalozzi's 
own methods were successfully carried through by another 
clever pedagogue, von Fellenberg, whose private Institute at 
Hofwil, near Berne, was attended by the sons of families 
known on both sides of the Atlantic. 

It was through these brilliant men of the 18th and 19th 
centuries that the leaders of the nations began to realize the 
importance and necessity of endowing youth with an education. 

256 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 257 

As early as 1830 the Swiss Cantonal Governments began to 
study the school problems, for in those days already the 
school was recognized as the instrument by which a democracy 
trains its members for efficiency and patriotic service. The 
same principle recently prompted Lloyd George to declare 
that the new Great Britain would have to give her public 
schools more moral and financial support, inasmuch as they 
constituted an important element of the nation's welfare. 

It is considered the duty of society to see that no child or 
man is wasted, but that he is prepared to live most efficiently 
the life which will have most meaning to himself and the 
greatest service to the social whole. The Swiss believe that 
democracy in education consists, not in placing before students 
of diverse and unequal capacities the same program with a 
pretext that all are given an "equal chance," but in offering to 
each individual an opportunity to develop a characteristic 
ability in a school adapted to his needs and to the demands of 
society. 

THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS 

The aim of the Swiss schools is to achieve as high a gen- 
eral average as possible and to generously assist those who 
find climbing difficult. Great attention is therefore already 
devoted to the low primary grades, where the inevitable foun- 
dation has to be laid for the future. A passage in the Federal 
Constitution indicates that "the cantons provide for adequate 
primary instruction which must be exclusively governed by 
the state." This tuition is obligatory and free of charge in the 
public schools. 

Every child in Switzerland must attend school for a period 
of 7-9 years, according to the respective cantonal laws. The 
compulsory attendance age is either 6 or 7 and play schools, 
similar to the American Kindergarten, are generally provided 
for small children between 4 and 7. 

The course of study at the primary schools includes princi- 



258 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

pally reading, writing, arithmetic, gymnastics, singing, draw- 
ing, history, geography and one foreign language. (In 
French Switzerland this would be German and in German 
Switzerland French.) A regular attendance of special courses 
in knitting, sewing and needlework is compulsory for the girls 
and many of the leading schools have added cooking and 
domestic science lessons to their curriculum. Boys and girls 
of one grade are generally taught together. The cities pro- 
vide a separate room for each grad, the same numbering 
about 30-40 pupils. In the small schools in the country, how- 
ever, there are as many as 4-5 grades in the same room and 
there are even a goodly number of hamlets where the school- 
master has to instruct the entire juvenile flock of the locality, 
ranging from 6-15 years of age ! How these schools can cover 
the prescribed program remains a wonder to many out- 
siders ; but there seems to be such a bond of sympathy between 
teacher and pupil and such a self-effacing devotion to his task 
on part of the former that the impossible is achieved as a 
matter of course. 

The majority of the Swiss primary schools provide free of 
charge the materials of instruction used by the individual 
pupils as well as by the school. Such expenses are generally 
shared between the respective cantonal governments and the 
communes. 

CONTINUATION OR REPETITION SCHOOLS 

Experience has shown that the knowledge acquired in the 
elementary schools must be extended or at least renewed 
after the compulsory attendance ceases, if it is to be retained 
for use in the practical life of the young man who will soon be 
entrusted with the duties of citizenship. For the benefit of 
such students, who leave school immediately after the pre- 
scribed compulsory term, some cantons have added so-called 
"Repetition Schools," and other cantons what is known as 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 259 

"Continuation Schools." An intermission of one or two years 
is generally allowed between the close of the elementary 
school period and the beginning of the Repetition or Continua- 
tion school. In this manner the pupil resumes his studies at a 
somewhat more mature age. The new courses concentrate 
especially on the perfection of the mother tongue, on Swiss 
geography, history and government questions, and are an 
excellent preparatory means for the examination which every 
future soldier of the Swiss army has to undergo when he 
enters the school of recruits at the age of twenty. 

The attendance of these schools is limited to the winter 
months and does not exceed seven hours per week. 

In Switzerland the schools are often described as "the 
palaces of democracy." Whether it be in Ian obscure mountain 
village, or in one of the handsome cities, the "temple of edu- 
cation" is just as conspicuous for its stately beauty as the never 
missing "temple of worship" is inspiring in its noble architec- 
ture. Where the physical and intellectual welfare of the 
young generation is concerned, the Swiss do not shrink from 
making a sacrifice and so it frequently happens that a com- 
munity whose general aspect totally lacks the stamp of pros- 
perity prides itself with a school building and equipments 
which must necessarily have occasioned heavily increased 
taxes to the citizens. 

OPEN-AIR SCHOOLS 

For children of sickly or frail constitution many cities have 
established open-air or forest schools, where the youngsters 
may enjoy the benefit of the fragrant, pine-scented air of the 
woods, together with their lessons. With a specified part of the 
day being devoted to study, resting and games and carefully 
prepared meals and refreshments being served free of charge, 
these delicate children gradually develop into healthy members 
of humanity. 



260 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

The public conscience has taken the problem of education 
so much to heart that it compels the schools to see that chil- 
dren do not go with insufficient food or clothing, and that 
when their homes are distant they may be able to dine near 
the school. Poor residents of cities are also given an oppor- 
tunity to send delicate youngsters to one of the so-called 
"vacation homes for school children," which are distributed 
all over the country and which, with the aid of donations and 
subscriptions, afford such children an opportunity to gain 
health and strength during the school holidays. 

THE SECONDARY AND INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 
The term of "Secondary School" is applied to schools usu- 
ally parallel with the higher grades in the primary. Their 
course of study, however, is more extended and of longer 
duration. In most of the cantons the pupils desirous of 
attending these higher schools are transferred to the same 
from the fifth grade of the primary school, provided they can 
pass the state-imposed examinations. 

The average length of duration of a secondary school course 
is 4 years, and after graduating from the same the students 
are ready to enter what is termed "Intermediate Schools," the 
same comprising: 

1. Institutions preparatory to universities, such as the 

gymnasia with their scientific, literary and commercial 
departments. 

2. Teachers' Seminaries. 

3. Technical Schools. 

4. Commercial Schools. 

The course of study in the first named group of institutions 
generally takes 4-4^ years. After its completion and the 
passing of a state examination the students are eligible to 
enter one of the universities or the Federal Polytechnic at 
Zurich. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 261 

Some intermediate schools, especially those of the smaller 
cantons, merely endeavor to give their students a complete 
education of a higher grade and many of them afford at the 
same time opportunities for boarding to pupils from distant 
localities. A few of these institutes are enterprises of 
religious orders and among them are the Roman Catholic 
Colleges at Schwyz, Einsiedeln and Engelberg, which are 
particularly well attended by youths hailing from the moun- 
tain districts. 

A special feature of the intermediate schools of French 
Switzerland are the language courses and the special classes 
for Swiss and foreign students whose mother tongue is not 
French. French is especially taught in these classes, and as 
soon as the students are sufficiently versed in this language 
they can attend the normal classes. 

Unlike the primary schools which are absolutely free, these 
public intermediate schools generally require a fee which is, 
however, so insignificant that people of medium circumstances 
do not find it a burden to let their children take advantage of 
these establishments. Exceptions are moreover always made 
in cases of really poor people and such children receive 
tuition and all school materials besides entirely free of charge. 
The majority of these intermediate schools have, moreover, 
stipend funds which are a further encouragement for poor 
parents whose children are anxious to acquire a higher edu- 
cation. 

Switzerland, the acknowledged Mecca of the tourists, has 
for many decades also encouraged travel among its native 
population. Every school takes a trip at least once a year, 
and while the lowest primary grades are treated with a 
necessarily short excursion of one-half day or one day, where 
the refreshments form probably the chief delight, "the flight 
into the world" assumes bigger proportions in the higher 
grades. Many of the intermediate schools of the larger cities 



262 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

arrange summer vacation trips lasting from 3-7 days, and 
while the students are expected to meet the always very 
moderate expenses of such an outing themselves, poor 
pupils- are never left behind. These trips which take the 
Swiss school children to the most exquisite spots in the 
country, famous for their historical associations, their natural 
beauty and other characteristics, are an infallible means of 
implanting into the youngsters' hearts a love, admiration and 
understanding for their native land which remains forever. 
This without doubt is the best foundation for 100 per cent 
patriotism in later life. 

Switzerland believes that money spent for schools will ulti- 
mately represent a sound investment, for the state and sta- 
tistics available for 1916 show that the government, cantons 
and communes spent together for primary, secondary and 
intermediate schools the sum of Fr. 74.303.847 or an average 
of Fr. 116 per pupil and Fr. 19 per capita of the population. 
These figures elevate the little mountain Republic to a very 
exalted rank among nations. At the same time it may be 
interesting to mention that the country spent in 1909 but 
Fr. 12 per capita for military purposes and there is no need 
to dwell on the great efficiency of the Swiss army which 
during the war had to keep ever vigilant and in training on 
the frontiers. 

THE VOCATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOLS 

That a people who has realized the importance of a good 
education, as the Swiss have, give also careful attention to 
vocational training, is not surprising. While their efforts in 
this field are still in an early stage, they are nevertheless 
already showing good results. 

Workers for Switzerland's most notable industries, for 
weaving, embroidery, machinery, watchmaking, hotel keeping 
and wood carving are all trained in schools especially devoted 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 263 

to these branches. Six technical institutes for pupils of the 
age of 15 years up prepare the same in 5-8 terms for a 
theoretical and practical activity in construction, machine 
building, electrical engineering, chemistry, etc. The diploma 
given by these establishments makes a student eligible for the 
Federal Polytechnic the Swiss Technical University at 
Zurich. 

A small number of agricultural and dairy schools, which 
all maintain model farms, afford a thorough training for 
young men who are desirous to become proficient in this 
branch. For the girls there are special schools for complete 
instruction in housekeeping. Courses are also available in 
dressmaking, millinery, embroidery and household economics, 
both for women who wish to take up this line of work pro- 
fessionally and for those who only desire to acquire a thor- 
ough knowledge of the same for home use. Some of these 
institutes are subventioned and governed by the cantons and 
communes, others by public welfare associations. 

Careful attention is also paid to commercial training. Be- 
sides the already mentioned commercial sections of the 
intermediate schools, there are special commercial schools at 
Geneva, Lausanne and Neuchatel. These commercial and 
technical schools are well frequented by students from vari- 
ous European and transatlantic countries and their individual 
programs take the requirements of these foreign pupils into 
special consideration. 

Commercial science in its highest stage is taught at the 
Academy of Commerce of St. Gall and at the department of 
commercial science of the University of Zurich, where the 
final examinations take place of students who are desirous to 
teach in this branch. 

Young people who are serving a practical commercial 
apprenticeship in some business firm have, moreover, an 
opportunity to learn the theoretical part of this branch by 



264 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

attending the special courses arranged for this purpose by 
the "Swiss Commercial Society." 

The newest creations in the field of vocational training are 
the schools for traffic and administration, where employees 
are trained for railroad, post, telegraph and customs service. 
Special institutes covering this field are, moreover, at St. 
Gall, Olten and Lucerne, and the technical schools of Bienne 
and Winterthur maintain each a railroad department. 

Finally there are also a number of music schools and con- 
servatories. While the first-named institutes teach music 
principally to complete a general education, they also under- 
take to turn out the average grade of piano teacher. The 
conservatories, however, of which there are one each at 
Basel, Geneva and Lausanne and two in Zurich, undertake 
to train artists and high grade professors. 

Vocational training is very generously supported by the 
government, which in the year 1916 for instance paid out the 
following subventions : 

For trade and industrial training Fr. 1.195.509 

For commercial training 1.033.495 

For household economics and vocational training 

of women 462.807 

For agricultural sckools 349-392 

Total Fr. 3.041.203 

Eighteen experts, of whom four are ladies, are commis- 
sioned by the government to assist in the supervision of these 
schools and courses. 

THE UNIVERSITIES 

The crowning point of the entire educational system in 
Switzerland are the seven cantonal universities and the Fed- 
eral Polytechnic. The creation of so many educational 
establishments of the highest rank gives ample proof of the 
idealistic tendency and the desire for learning of the Swiss, 
not to mention their readiness for great and continued 
pecuniary sacrifice for this purpose. In this connection one 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 265 

must not forget that the little Alpine Republic numbers but 
3,900,000 inhabitants. At the time of the foundation of the 
Universities of Berne and Lausanne more than half of the 
population of those two cantons, Berne and Vaud, belonged 
to the agricultural class and their legislative body, who has 
to set aside the large appropriations for the maintenance of 
these schools, includes to-day yet numerous farmer repre- 
sentatives. 

How lavishly the little Alpine Republic is endowed with 
high grade institutions of learning is apparent from the 
following figures : 

Switzerland provides one university for 

about every 570,000 inhabitants 

France 2,500,000 inhabitants 

Belgium 2,000,000 inhabitants 

Italy i ,700,000 inhabitants 

Germany 3,300,000 inhabitants 

The above statistics indicate, of course, that the Swiss 
universities do not only accommodate native students, but a 
great number of foreigners. During the winter term 1913-14 
the percentage of the latter was 55 with a total of 9,445 stu- 
dents. Conditions changed, of course, quite considerably 
during the war, and during the winter semester 1916-17 for 
instance there were but 37 per cent, foreign students among 
the total number of 8,640. 

The conditions of matriculation generally require a matricu- 
lation certificate from an intermediate school, and if this is 
not available the student may pass a special entrance exami- 
nation. Auditors for special courses chosen by them are also 
admitted without previous examination for the same fee as 
regular students. Ladies enjoy the same privileges all over. 
While French is the official language at the Universities of 
Geneva, Lausanne and Neuchatel, German is spoken at Basel, 
Berne and Zurich. Fribourg, bordering German and French 



266 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Switzerland, is mixed and both German and French lectures 
are given at the Federal Polytechnic, Zurich. 

The University of Basel, dating back to 1460, is the oldest 
establishment of its kind in Switzerland. Many eminent men, 
among them Oecolompad, the theologist ; Paracelsus, the great 
teacher of medicine; Jacob Burckhardt, the art historian and 
Friedrich Nietzsche, the philosopher, helped to establish and 
increase its reputation, and the well-known family of 
Bernoulli which emigrated to Basel from Flanders some 
centuries ago has also furnished several of the most quoted 
professors of the university. As Basel is the country's 
wealthiest city, the university is liberally supported by num- 
erous scientific societies and public welfare associations. It 
disposes of an unusual variety of auxiliary institutions, such 
as libraries, seminaries and special institutes. 

While this oldest of Swiss universities has been surpassed 
by its young sisters of Zurich and Berne, as far as the num- 
ber of attending students is concerned, it is known as one of 
the most serious institutions of learning, where on account of 
the limited number of students, the professors are particu- 
larly able to get into close touch with the individual members 
of their classes, to give them more personal help and to live 
on more friendly terms with them than is possible in places 
with crowded lecture rooms. 

The other Swiss universities are creations of the 19th 
Century. While Geneva, Lausanne and Berne possessed 
"scientific academies" for some considerable time, it required 
the almost unanimous resolution of the Cantonal Council of 
Zurich to decide on the foundation of a second university in 
that city in 1832. To-day the University of Zurich is one of 
the leading institutions of learning in the land of the Alps 
and it occupies, since 1914, a building which will forever be 
the pride and inspiration of both citizens and students. In 
addition to the regular faculties the city also maintains a 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 267 

special Dental College and a Veterinary medical faculty. The 
auxiliary institutions belonging to the v university are excep- 
tionally numerous and well-equipped and together with the 
university they form an imposing group of buildings often 
described as the "Quartier Latin" of this fair city. 

In 1834, two years later than Zurich, Berne, the native city 
of the universally known savant Albrecht von Haller, devel- 
oped its academy into a university which also disposes of a 
number of auxiliary institutions among which the Municipal 
Library and the various establishments devoted to medicine 
deserve special mention. Every university has generally a 
department in which it excels; in the case of Berne it is the 
faculty for medicine (to which a veterinary section has been 
added) which enjoys a world reputation. 

In the year 1872 the State of Geneva elevated its academy, 
founded by the reformer Calvin in 1559, to the rank of a 
university. The faculty of medicine was opened in 1876. 
This particular institution of learning has risen rapidly into 
notoriety in Switzerland on account of the fame of its pro- 
fessors, and owing to its laboratories and general equipment 
which meet all the exigencies of modern science. Its special 
features are the school of chemistry, the school of anaromj, 
the public library and the observatory, which latter is also 
entrusted with the task of verifying the specially fine time- 
pieces (chronometers) which are turned out by Genevese 
watch factories. 

The University of Lausanne, which also includes a school 
of engineers is the second largest of French Switzerland. 
It occupies one of the most handsome buildings to be found 
in the country, the "Palais de Rumine," an imposing struc- 
ture in Florentine style, which was erected from 1898-1905. 
The cantonal library, the Museum of Art and other collec- 
tions are housed in this noble temple of education, whose con- 
struction was made possible by a generous legacy left for 



268 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

this purpose by Gabriel de Rumine, a one-time student of the 
academy of the city. This latter college was founded in 1537 
by the Bernese Government and raised to the dignity of a 
university in 1891. 

The University of Fribourg, with Roman Catholic faculty, 
founded in 1889, and the University of Neuchatel, elevated to 
this rank from an academy in 1909 are as yet without a 
medical faculty. 

On account of the competitive spirit of the individual can- 
tons in the matter of establishing universities, the Swiss 
Government has been spared the expense of creating a Fed- 
eral University, as foreseen by the Constitution. It has, how- 
ever, splendidly fulfilled another obligation prescribed by the 
same the creation of the Federal Polytechnic at Zurich. 
Opened in the year 1855 this institution is far-famed to-day 
for its perfect organization and its eminent teaching staff. 

The principal domains covered by this technical university 
are the following: Architecture, engineering, machinery, 
chemistry, agriculture and forestry. While the lecture rooms 
are in an older edifice of dignified style, a large number of 
surrounding annexes, such as the Chemical Laboratory, the 
Laboratory for Industrial Mechanics, the Colleges for For- 
estry, Agriculture and Natural Science are available for prac- 
tical study. 

The conditions of matriculation are similar to those of the 
other universities. Older students with a practical experience 
and desirous of perfecting their theoretical knowledge receive 
certain concessions. Students have to pass final examinations 
for the diploma. The managing direction and supervision of 
the institute is in the hands of the Federal Council and the 
School Commission selected by the same. 

PRIVATE AND SPECIAL SCHOOLS 
All the cantons devote careful attention to the education 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 269 

of poor, defective, subnormal, blind and deaf and mute 
children, and there are a number of well-organized special 
institutions for these unfortunate members of human society. 

'During the past few decades Switzerland has, moreover, 
acquired universal fame as the country par excellence for 
private educational establishments of all grades and every 
variety. These institutes are distributed all over the land, in 
German, French and Italian speaking parts, but it must be 
admitted that French Switzerland excels in the number of 
such schools. Private schools for children of the prescribed 
school age are under the supervision of the cantons; they are 
carefully organized and their teaching staff consists of men 
and women who have received their regular state diplomas as 
educators. In view of the acknowledged super-efficiency of 
the Swiss public schools, the private educational establish- 
ments are, of course, obliged to maintain an equally high 
standard and it goes, therefore, without saying that they are 
constantly endeavoring to improve and perfect their systems. 

With the exception of the regular university courses, the 
private schools cover every phase of study taken up by the 
different public schools. Their most successful field is to be 
found in preparatory and practical vocational training 
(teaching, commerce, trade and art) ; in preparatory training 
for the higher grade of intermediate schools and the univer- 
sities and especially also in the general and special training 
of young people in foreign languages. French Switzerland 
is particularly successful in this latter field. 

On the classic shores of the Lake of Geneva, in the entire 
Canton of Vaud, in the Canton of Fribourg and in the Canton 
of Neuchatel are numerous private institutes to which parents 
of all nationalities entrust the care and education of their 
sons and daughters, feeling confident that these establishments 
do not only look after the bodily and spiritual welfare of 
their charges, but that they also endeavor to become a home 



270 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

in the real sense of the word for all these young people. 
Parents residing in countries where the educational system 
is not fully developed are consequently glad to be able to 
have their children educated in a land which is so splendidly 
organized for this very purpose and which is not only 
renowned for its wonderful climatic advantages and ex- 
quisite scenery, but also for its up-to-date and refined 
conditions of living. Even the Swiss families realize the 
great advantage of sending their sons and daughters to a 
finishing school in a part of the country where the official 
language is different to theirs and it is therefore a general 
occurrence that young people from one section of Switzerland 
attend for a year or two or even longer a public or a board- 
ing school in another part of the country, in order to perfect 
themselves in French or German as the case may be, and in 
order to absorb at this most impressive age knowledge, -which 
will prove a formidable asset for their whole lives. 

And as there are Swiss hotels to cater to every purse, so 
there are private schools for students of limited or ample means. 
To impart to their pupils an education of irreproachable 
standard, in surroundings that are both beneficial to body and 
mind, is the foremost aim of all these establishments. While 
outdoor sports of every description are becoming a feature 
in every school, the fashionable establishments lay, of course, 
special stress on the same, as well as on summer and winter 
sojourns in the mountains and dancing and appropriate social 
activities, so as to prepare their wards to later on fill in a 
befitting manner their position in society. 

The private schools are also destined to fill an actual need. 
Children who are unable to attend public school, be it on 
account of delicate health, insufficient adaptability to study 
in a big classroom or some other reason, can generally be 
educated with success in a private establishment, where the 
limited number of pupils makes it possible for the teachers 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 271 

to study each child and to call into life and develop any 
special talents which may still lay dormant. In addition to 
the actual educational training these private establishments 
endeavor, moreover, to exercise a beneficial influence upon the 
formation of a child's character; with infinite care they strive 
to implant into its whole being that fineness of spirit and 
quality of culture which in adult years distinguishes leaders 
of men. 

The development of character and intellect, as well as 
physical training through working in fields and woods, and 
wandering by lake and mountains is the particular aim of the 
so-called "Ecoles nouvelles." Several "Alpine institutes" for 
boys and girls have also been established in the mountain 
regions particularly in the Canton of the Grisons, where 
students of frail constitution may enjoy the benefit of the 
invigorating Alpine climate throughout the year. 

The foregoing review of the Swiss school system indicates 
that the Swiss are, of all peoples, the most thoroughly imbued 
with the need of education and at the same time the most 
conscientious to see that its advantages may be fully enjoyed 
by all. Where public instruction is concerned, this otherwise 
extremely saving people, are generous in the highest degree. 
Realizing that in elevating their children they are elevating 
themselves, they are willing to make sacrifices for the schools 
until "it hurts." "Education brings liberation" is the motto 
of the Swiss and herein lies the secret of the distinguished! 
rank occupied by the little mountain Republic in the world 
of learning. 



272 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 






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Montreal 
Toronto, Ont . . . 

Winnipeg, Man . 
Vancouver, B. C 



LEGATIONS AND CONSULATES IN SWITZERLAND 

Argentine Republic: Legation in Berne, Consul-General in 
Geneva; Consul in Lausanne; Vice-Consuls in Aarau, Basle, 
Bellinzona, Berne, Lucerne, Lugano, Neuchatel, St. Gall, 
Soleure and Zurich. 

Austria-Hungary: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in 
Zurich; Consuls or Vice-Consuls in Basle, Davos, Geneva, 
Lausanne and St. Gall. 

Bavaria: Legation in Berne. 

Belgium: Legation in Berne; Consuls in Basle, Berne,. 
Geneva, Lucerne, Neuchatel and Zurich. 

Brazil: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in Geneva; 
Vice-Consul in Berne and Lausanne. 

Bulgaria: Legation in Berne. 

Chile: Legation in Berne; Consuls in Geneva and Zurich. 

Columbia: Legation in Berne: Consul-General in Geneva; 
Consul in Lugano ; Vice-Consul in Lausanne. 

Costa Rica: Consul-General in Berne; Consul in Geneva. 

Cuba: Vice-Consul in Geneva. 

Denmark: Consul in Zurich; Vice-Consul in Geneva. 

Dominican Republic: Consuls in Berne and Zurich. 

Ecuador: Charge d'affaires in Lausanne; Consul in 
Lugano. 

France: Embassy in Berne; Consuls-General in Geneva and 
Zurich ; Consuls in Basle and Lausanne. 

Germany: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in Zurich; 
Consuls in Basle, Berne, Davos, Geneva, Lausanne and 
Lugano. 

Great Britain: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in 
273 



274 HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 

Zurich; Consuls or Vice-Consuls in Basle, Berne, Davos, 
Geneva, Lausanne, Lucerne, Lugano, Montreux, Neuchatel, 
St. Moritz and St. Gall. 

Greece: Consuls-General in Berne, Geneva, Zurich; Consul 
in Lugano. 

Guatemala: Charge d'affaires in Geneva. 

Hayti: Consul in Geneva. 

Holland: Legation in Berne; Consuls or Vice-Consuls in 
Basle, Berne, Davos, Geneva, Montreux and Zurich. 

Honduras: Consul-General in Berne; Vice-Consul in 
Geneva. 

Italy: Legation in Berne; Consuls-General in Basle, Geneva, 
Lugano and Zurich ; Vice-Consuls in Brigue, Coire and St. 
Gall. 

Japan : Legation in Berne ; Consul in Zurich. 

Lithuania: Legation in Berne. 

Mexico: Consul-General in Berne; Consuls in Basle, 
Geneva, Lugano and Zurich. 

Nicaragua: Consul-General in Berne; Consul in Basle. 

Norway: Consul-General in Zurich; Vice-Consuls in Basle, 
Berne, Geneva and Vevey. 

Panama: Consuls in Chaux-de-fonds, Geneva, Lausanne, 
Lugano and Zurich. 

Paraguay: Consul-General in Berne; Consuls in Geneva, 
Lausanne and Zurich ; Vice-Consul in Aarau. 

Peru: Consul-General in Geneva; Consuls in Lausanne and 
Lugano. 

Portugal: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in Berne; 
Consuls or Vice-Consuls in Basle, Davos, Geneva, Lausanne, 
Lucerne and Ziirich. 

Roumania: Legation in Berne; Consuls in Basle, Geneva 
and Zurich. 

Salvador: Consuls-General in Geneva and Zurich. 

Servia: Legation in Berne; Consul in Geneva. 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 275 

Spain: Legation in Berne; Consuls or Vice-Consuls in 
Basle, Berne, Geneva, Lenzburg, Montreux, St. Gall and 
Zurich. 

Sweden: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in Geneva; 
Consuls or Vice-Consuls in Basle, Neuchatel and Zurich. 

Turkey: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in Geneva. 

United States of America: Legation in Berne; Consul- 
General in Zurich; Consuls in Basle, Berne, Geneva and St. 
Gall; Consular Agents in Lucerne and Vevey. 

Uruguay: Legation in Berne; Consul-General in Geneva; 
Consul in Basle; Vice-Consul in Lugano. 

Venezuela: Consul-General in Geneva; Consul in Lucerne. 



THERMOMETRIC SCALES 



Centigrade 


or Celsius Reaumur Fahrenheit 




o 


o.o = 


32.0 






I 


= 0.8 = 


33-8 






2 


= 1.6 = 


35-6 






3 


2.4 = 


37-4 






4 


= 3-2 = 


39-2 






5 


= 4.0 = 


41.0 






6 


= 4.8 = 


42.8 






7 


= 5-6 = 


44-6 






8 


= 6.4 = 


46.4 






9 


= 7.2 = 


48.2 






10 


n: 8.0 r^ 


50.0 




JMM 


I 


= 0.8 = 


30.2 







IO 


= _ 8.0 = 


14.0 




r 


20 


= ~ I6 ' = ~ 


4.0 








METRIC SYSTEM 










MEASURE OF WEIGHT 










(Unit Gramme) 










Oz. 


Lb. 








Grains Troy 


Avoir. 


Cwt. 












Decigramme. 




. i 5433 o 003 






Gramme 




jc 4323^ O O32 


" * * > 


.... 


Decagramme 




154 32349 o 321 


O.022 
O.220 
2.2O4 


O.OOI 
0.019 


Hectogramme. . 
Kilogramme. . . 




... 1543.23488 3.2:5 
... 15432.34880 32 150 






MEASURE OF LENGTH 










(Unit Metre) 










Inches Feet 


Yards 


Mis. 


Millimetre 




. .. . o 0^037 o 003 


O.OOI 
O.OIO 


.... 


Centimetre. . . 




.... 0.39371 0.0.32 


Decimetre 




} QO -Q<} O ^''S 


O. i O9 




Metre .... 




39 370^9 3 280 


1 .093 




Decametre. . . 




391 70790 32 808 


10.9.36 


0.006 


Hectometre. . . 
Kilometre 




3937 07900 328 089 


100.363 
1093.633 


0.063 
0.621 




3937O 79000 3280 899 






276 







HEIGHTS OF THE MAIN PEAKS 



In the Valais 



FEET 

Monte Rosa 15,217 

Dom (Mischabel) 14,940 

Lyskamm 14,889 

Weisshorn 14,804 

Matterhorn 14,782 

Dent Blanche 14,318 

Grand Combin 14,164 

Castor 13,879 

Zinal Rothhorn 13,856 

Dent d'Herens 13,715 



FEET 

Pollux 13,430 

Breithorn 13,380 

Ober Gabelhorn 13,364 

Allalinhorn 13,236 

Grand Cornier 13,022 

Mont Blanc of Seilon .... 12,700 

Pigne d'Arolla 12,471 

Monte Leone ir ,684 

Tour Salieres 10,588 

Dent du Midi 10,450 



In the Bernese Oberland 



FEET 

Fmsteraarhorn 14,026 

Gross-Aletschhorn 13,721 

Jungfrau 13,670 

Monch 13,465 

Schreckhorn 13,386 

Eiger 13,042 

Agassizhorn 12,980 

Distelhorn 12,297 

Balmhorn 12,176 



FEET 

Blumlisalp 12,044 

Wetterhorn 11,873 

Altels n,93o 

Gspaltenhorn 11,293 

VVildhorn 10,709 

Wildstrubel 10,673 

Grand Muveran 10,043 

Oldenhorn 10,250 

Diablerets 10,650 



In Central Switzerland 



FEET 

Damastock 11,920 

Galenstock 1 1 ,802 

Sustenhorn 11,523 

Titlis 10,527 

Spannorter 10,506 



FEET 

Pizzo Rotondo 10,489 

Urirotstock 9,620 

Pilatus 6,995 

Stanserhorn 6,236 

Rigi 5,900 



277 



278 



HOW TO SEE SWITZERLAND 



In Eastern Switzerland 
(Except the Grisons) 



FEET 

Todi 11,887 

Oberalpstock 10,926 

Claridenstock 10,729 

Ringelspitz 10,667 

Grosse Windgalle 10,473 



Piz Segnes 
Glarnisch 



PEET 

10,178 

9,580 



Calanda 9,213 

Santis 8,216 

Churfirsten 7,576 



In the Grisons 



FEET 

Bernina 13,304 

Piz Roseg 12,934 

Piz Palu 12,835 

Piz Cambrena 11,835 

Piz Tschierva 1 1 ,693 

Piz Corvatsch 1 1 ,339 

Piz Kesch 11,228 

Piz Linard 11,201 

Rheinwaldhorn 11,149 

Piz Julier ...-- -,.. 11,106 



FEET 

Piz d'Err 11,093 

Piz Morteratsch 12,317 

Piz Tambo 10,749 

Campo Tencia 10,089 

Piz Languard 10,716 

Silvrettahorn 10,657 

Piz Vadred 10,584 

Piz Medel 10,509 

Tinzenhorn 10,430 

Piz Pisoc 10,427 



Literature: 

Various publications issued by Swiss Tourist interests. 

Travel Topics by Marie Widmer. 



INDEX 



Aartu 

Aargau 

Acquarossa 

Accommodation (Steamer)... 

Accommodation (Hotels) 

Adelboden 

Aeschi 

Agassizhorn 

Aigle 

Airolo 

Aletschhorn 

Aletsch Glacier 176, 

Allalinhprn 

Alp Grtira 

Alpnachstad 

Altdorf 

Altels 

Alvaneu 

Amsteg 

Andeer 

Andermatt 

Appenzell 8, 

Arbon 

Ardetz 

Arolla 

Arosa 

Arth-Goldau 

Ascona 

Augst 

Auto-bus Service 

Automobiling 

Avenches 

Axenfels 

Axenstein 

Axenstrasse 

Baden 

Baggage (Steamer) 

Baggage (Railroads) 

Baldegg and Lake 

Balmhorn 

Basle 8, 

Baveno 

Beatenbucht 



221 
13 
22 

1 88 
1 88 
277 
167 

220 

277 

186 
277 
214 
199 
198 
277 

211 
198 
211 
198 

207 

200 

216 

172 
2IO 
I 9 6 
222 
149 
123 
125 
153 
197 
197 
197 
ISO 

II 

199 

277 
146 
224 
181 



PAGB 

Beatenberg 181 

Beckenried 197 

Belalp 174 

Bellagio 224 

Bellinzona 221 

Bergiin 211 

Berisal 174 

Berne 8, 177 

Bernese Oberland 177 

Bernina 278 

Bevers 211 

Bex-les-Bains 168 

Biasca 221 

Bienne and Lake 15* 

Bignasco 222 

Bloney 166 

Blumlisalp 277 

Boating 128 

Bormio 215 

Boromean Islands 224 

Bouveret 167 

Braunwald 204 

Breithorn 173 

Brienz and Lake 187 

Brigue (Brig) 174 

Brissago 222 

Briinig Pass 199 

Brunnen 197 

Brusio 215 

Buchs 208 

Bulle 166 

Burgdorf 1 80 

Biirgenstock 197 

Burglen 198 

Calanda 278 

Campfer 213 

Campocologno 215 

Campo Tencia 278 

Capolago 224 

Carriages 123 

Cassarate 224 

Castagnolia 224 

Castle of Chillon 166 



279 



280 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Castor 277 

Caux 166 

Celerina 212 

Chables 171 

Chamby 166, 191 

Champery 167 

Champex 171 

Chamonix 169 

Chandolin 172 

Chateau d'Oeux 190 

Chatel St. Denis 166 

Chatelard 1 69 

ChaEseral, Mount 153 

Chexbres 166 

Chesieres 168 

Chiasso 224 

Chiavenna 214 

Chillon 1 66 

Chur (Coire) 209 

Churnrsten 208 

Cinuskel 216 

Clarens 1 66 

Claridenstock 278 

Climate 138 

Colico 215 

Col de Pillon 190 

Coire (Chur) 209 

Como, Lake 224 

Consulates in U. S. A 272 

Consulates in Switzerland.... 273 

Constance and Lake 206 

Coppet 164 

Corbeyrier 167 

Cresta 211 

Currencies 16, 122 

Customs 15, 83 

Damastock 277 

Davos 217 

Dent Blanche 173 

Dent du Midi 168 

Dent d'Herens 277 

Delemont 152 

Diablerets, Les 167 

Diligence Service 123 

Disentis 219 

Distances (ocean) 18 

Distelhorn 277 

Dom 173 

Ebnat 208 

Eggishorn 176 



fAGB 

Eiger 183 

Eigergletscher 183 

Eigerwand 1 84 

Eismeer 1 84 

Einsiedeln 202 

Elm 203 

Emmenthal 180 

Engadine, Lower 215 

Engadine, Upper 2ia 

Engelberg 197 

Entlebuch 199 

Erlenbach 189 

Erstfeid 198 

Estayayer 155 

Evolene 172 

Expenses 22 

Faido 221 

Falls of the Rhine 205 

Fares 85 

Festivals 247 

Fetan 217 

Fideris 218 

Fiesch 176 

Filisur 21 x 

Finhaut 169 

Finsteraarhorn 277 

Fionnay 171 

Fishing 128 

Flims 210 

Fliiela Pass 216 

Fliielen 198 

Fluehli-Ranft 199 

Foreign Money 16, 122 

Fribourg 8, 153 

Frutigen 188 

Funds 14 

Furka Pass 177 

Gabelhorn, Ober 277 

Gais 207 

Galenstock 277 

Gandria 224 

Gemmi Pass 172, 189 

Geneva and Lake 8, 157 

Gersau 197 

Gimel 165 

Giswil 200 

Giornico 221 

Glarus 8, 203 

Glarnisch 204 

Gletsch 176 



INDEX 



281 



Glion 1 66 

Glovelier 153 

Goeschenen 198 

Goldau 196 

Golfing 128 

Goppenstein 189 

Gorges du Tricnt 169 

Gornergrat 173 

Grand Combin 277 

Grand Cornier 277 

Grand Muveran 277 

Great St. Bernard 169 

Grimence 172 

Grimmialp 189 

Grimsel Pass 177 

Grindelwald 187 

Grisons 8, 209 

Grosse Windgalle 278 

Gruben-Meiden 1 72 

Grtinen 1 80 

Gruyeres 1 66 

Gryon 168 

Gspaltenhorn 277 

Gstaad 190 

Gsteig 190 

Guard* 216 

Gunten 181 

Gurnigel 180 

Gurtenkulm 180 

Hallwil and Lake 199 

Hapsburg, Castle 150 

Harder 182 

Heiden 207 

Heights of Peaks 277 

Heimwehfluh 182 

Herisau 208 

Heustrich Baths 188 

Hilterfingen 181 

History i 

Hohle Gasse 199 

Hotels 25 

Hotel Telegraph Code 23 

Huttwil 180 

Ilanz 219 

Immensee 199 

Information Offices 129 

Interlaken 181 

International R. R. Routes... 20 

Itineraries 225 

Joch Pass 197 



PAGB 

Julier Pass 214 

Jungf rau 183 

Jungfraujoch 185 

Kandersteg 188 

Kappel 208 

Kehrsiten 1 97 

Kerns-Kagiswil 199 

Klausen Pass 204 

Klosters 218 

Konstanz and Lake 206 

Kiiblis 218 

Kussnacht 199 

La Chaux-de-fonds 153 

Lac Noir 155 

Langnau 1 80 

Lauenen 190 

Lausanne 165 

Lauterbrunnen 182 

Lavey-les-Bains i6 

Lavin 216 

Lavorgo 221 

Le Locle 153 

Le Prese 215 

Legations in Switzerland 273 

Lenk 1 89 

Lenzburg 199 

Lenzerheide 210 

Les Ayants 190 

Les Diablerets 167 

Les Hauderes 1 72 

Les Marecottes 169 

Les Pleiades 166 

Les Plans 1 68 

Les Rasses 153 

Leuk 172 

Leysin 167 

Lichtensteig 208 

Ligornetto 223 

Linthal 204 

Locarno and Lake Maggiore.. 221 

Lorenzo 224 

Lotschberg 188 

Lourtier 171 

Lucerne and Lake 8, 191 

Lugano and Lake 223 

Luino 223 

Lukmanier Pass 220 

Luggage 1 3, 83 

Lungern and Lake 200 

Lutzelfliik 180- 



282 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Lyss ...................... 155 

Lvskamm .................. 173 

Macolin ................... 152 

Maloja .................... 213 

Mais ...................... 216 

Map of Switzerland ......... 13 

Map of International R. R... 20 

Marjelen Lake ............. 176 

Martigny .................. 168 

Martinsbruck .............. 215 

Matterhorn ................ 173 

Mayens de Sion ............ 172 

Mauyoisin ................. 171 

Meiringen ................. 187 

Melchtal ................... 200 

Melide .................... 224 

Menaggio .................. 224 

Merligen ................... 181 

Mesocco .................. 22 1 

Metric System ............. 276 

Mischabels ................ 173 

Mineral Springs ........... 140 

Monch .................... 183 

Money ................. 16, 122 

Montana-Vermala .......... 172 

Montbovon ............. 166, 190 

Mont Blanc ................ 169 

Mont Blanc of Seilon ....... 277 

Mont Pelerin .............. 166 

Mont Soleil ............... 153 

Monte Br ................ 224 

Monte Generoso ........... 224 

Monte Leone .............. 277 

Monte Rosa ............... 1 73 

Monte San Salvatore ....... 224 

Monthey .................. 1 67 

Montreux ................. 166 

Morat and Lake ........... 153 

Morcote .................. 224 

Morel ..................... 175 

Merges ................... 165 



x . 

Morschach ................. 197 

Mountain Railroads ........ 121 

Mountaineering ............ 124 

Moudon ................... 153 

Moutier .................. 152 

Mulenen .................. 188 

Muottas Muraigl ........... 213 

Muralto ................... 333 



Miirren 183 

Munster 216 

NafeTs 203 

National Park 216 

Nesslau 208 

Netstal 203 

Neuchatel and Lake 8, 153 

Neuhausen 205 

Niesen 188 

Noiremont 152 

Nyon i 

Oberalp Pass i, 

Oberalpstock 278 

Oberhofen 181 

Ocean Distances 18 

Oey-Diemtigen 189 

Ofen Pass 215 

Oldenhorn 277 

Olivone 221 

Olten 151 

Orsieres 169 

Ouchy 165 

Palezieux 155 

Pallanza 224 

Panixer Pass 203 

Paradiso 223 

Parpan 210 

Passports 14 

Passugg 2 1 o 

Payerne 153 

Peaks, Principal 277 

Pf af ers 204 

Pf affikon 202 

Pigne d'Arolla 277 

Pilatus 196 

Piora 220 

Piz Cambrena 278 

Piz Corvatsch 278 

Piz d'Err 278 

Piz della Margna 212 

Piz Tulier 278 

Piz Kesch 278 

Pir Lan guard 214 

Piz Linard 278 

Piz Medel 278 

Piz Morteratsch 212 

Piz Nair 212 

Piz Palu au 

Piz Pisoc 278 

Piz Rosatsch 212 



INDEX 



283 



FAGK 

Piz Roaeg 212 

Piz Segnes 278 

Piz Tambo 278 

Piz Tschierva 212 

Piz Vadred 278 

Pizzo Rotondo 277 

Planning the Tour 13 

Pollux 277 

Ponte Tresa 223 

Pontresina 214 

Population 8 

Porlezza 224 

Porrentruy 152 

Ports of Debarkation 20 

Poschiavo 215 

Postal Rates 122 

Preda 211 

Prangins 164 

Quaint Customs and Festivals 247 

Ragaz 204 

Randa 173 

Railroads, International 20 

Railroads, Swiss 83 

Railroads, Mountain 121 

Railroad Fares 85 

Rapperswil 202 

Reichenbach 188 

Reichenau-Tamins 210 

Rheinfall 205 

Rheinfelden 149 

Rheinwaldhqrn 278 

Rhone Glacier 167, 177 

Riederalp 175 

Rigi 196 

Ringelspitz 278 

Ritom 220 

Rochers de Naye 166 

Rodi-Fiesso 221 

Rolle 165 

Romanshorn 206 

Ronco 222 

Rorschach 206 

Rosenlaui 187 

Rossiniere 190 

Rothenbrunnen 210 

Rutli 197 

Saanen 190 

Saas-Fee 173 

Sachseln 200 

Saignelegier 153 



PACK 

Salvan 168 

Samaden 211 

San Bernardino 211 

Sanetsch Pass 190 

San Salvatore 224 

Santa Maria 216 

Santis 208 

Sarnen and Lake 200 

Scaletta Pass 218 

Scanfs 216 

Schauffhausen 8, 205 

Scheidegg, Kleine 183 

Scheidegg, Grosse 187 

Schinznach 151 

Schools and School Life 256 

Schreckhorn 277 

Schuls 216 

Schwanden 203 

Schwyz 8, 198 

Schynige Platte 182 

Season 22 

Seelisberg 197 

Segnes Pass 203 

Sembrancher 169 

Serneus 218 

Sierre (Siders) 172 

Sils Maria 213 

Sils Baselgia 213 

Silvaplana 213 

Silvrettahorn 278 

Simplon Pass 1 74 

Sion 171 

Sisikon 197 

Soleure 8, 151 

Somvix 219 

Sonceboz 1 53 

Sonloup 190 

Spas 140 

Spannorter 277 

Speicher 207 

Spiez 1 8 1 

Spinabad 218 

Splugen Pass 211 

Stachelberg 204 

Stalden 172 

Stans 197 

Stanserhorn 196 

Steamer Passage 13 

Steamer Services 17, 18 

Stein am Rhein 206 



284 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Stein-Saskingen 149 

Stelvio Pass 215 

Strela Pass 218 

Stresa -.. 224 

St, Antonien 218 

St. Bernard Pass 169 

St. Cerque 164 

Ste. Croix 153 

St. Gall 8, 206 

St. Gothard 198, 220 

St. Imier 153 

St. Leffier 166 

St. Luc . 173 

St, Maurice 168 

St Moritz and Lake 213 

St. Niklaus 173 

St. Theodule Pass 174 

Sumiswald 180 

Surencn Pass 197 

Su<5 216 

Susten Pass 198 

Sustenhorn 277 

Tariff Railroads 85 

Tariff. Hotels 25 

Tarasp 216 

Tasch 173 

Telegraph Rates 123 

Tell's Birthplace 198 

Tell's Chapel 197 

Tell's Platte 197 

Tenigerbad 219 

Tennis 128 

Territet 166 

Thalwil 202 

Thermometric Scales 276 

Thun and Lake 180 

Thurgau 8 

Thusis aio 

Ticino 8 

Tickets, Railroads 83 

Tiefenkastel 210 

Time 19 

Tinzenhorn 278 

Titlis 197 

Tirano 215 

Todi 278 

Tour Saheres 277 

Tour, The '. 146 

Tours of short Periods 225 

Trafoi 215 



PAGB 

Transatlantic 

Steamer Services 17 

Treib 197 

Trogen 207 

Truns 219 

Umbrail Pass 216 

Unterwalden 8 

Uomo Pass 220 

Uri 8 

Urirptstock 277 

Uetliberg 202 

Valais 8 

Valendas 219 

Vallorcine 169 

Val Sinestra 217 

Vaud 8 

Vernayez 168 

Versan-Safien 219 

Vevey 166 

Via Mala 210 

Viege (Visp) 173 

Villars 167 

Villeneuve 168 

Vissoye 173 

Vitznau 197 

Vulpera 216 

Wadenswil 203 

Waldhaus-Flims 210 

Walking 124 

Wallenstadt 204 

Wassen 198 

Watering Places 140 

Wattwil 208 

Weesen 204 

Weggis 197 

Weissbad 208 

Weissenburg 189 

Weissenstein 153 

Weisshorn 173 

Wengen 183 

Wengeralp 183 

Wetterhorn 187 

Wiesen 218 

Wildegg 151 

Wilderswil 182 

Wildhaus 208 

Wildhorn 277 

Wildstrubel 190 

Wimmis 1 89 

Windisch 150 



INDEX 



285 



PAGE 

Winter 130 

Wintersport Centres 137 

Winterthur 206 

Yverdon 153 

Zermatt 173 

Zernez 216 

Ziegelbrucke 203 

Zinal 172 



FAGB 

Zinal Rothorn 173 

Zug and Lake 8, 199 

Zugerberg 199 

Zuoz 215 

Zurich and Lake 8, 200 

Zweilutschinen 182 

Zweisimmen 189 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR 
YOUR GUIDANCE 



INVESTMENT 

SECURITIES 

Domestic and Foreign 

Execution of orders on all European 
Stock Exchanges 

Specialists in 

SWISS SECURITIES AND SWISS 
EXCHANGE 



A. ISELIN & CO. 

Members of the New York Stock Exchange 

36 Wall Street New York City 

Cable Address : 
ISELIN, NEWYORK 



Lee, Higginson & Co. 

New York Boston Chicago 

Higginson & Co., London 



GOVERNMENT BONDS 
CORPORATION BONDS 

Foreign Exchange, Letters of Credit 
Acceptances 



The issue in the United States of $25,000,000 Govern- 
ment of Switzerland 8% bonds, for which we are Fiscal 
Agents, was readily taken in July 1920, by Banks, Trust 
Companies and individual investors. Switzerland is 
one of the wealthiest countries in Europe and holds a 
position of unique strength as the oldest republic, and 
one that has enjoyed high financial credit. 



COOK'S 



THE FOREMOST 
TRAVEL ORGRmZATIOM 

IN THE WQRLO 

ESCORTED TOURS AND CRUISES 

INDEPENDENT TRAVEL 
BANKING AND EXCHANGE 

INSURANCE 

HOTEL COUPONS 

AERIAL TRAVEL 

AUTOMOBILE TOURS 

BAGGAGE AND CARGO SHIPMENTS 

TRAVELERS CHEQUES 

We Invite Correspondence 

THOS. COOK & SON 

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Chicago Philadelphia Boston San Francisco 
Los Angeles Montreal Toronto Vancouver 

750 Offices Thro'Jihest (he World 



TRAVEL SERVICE 



lc he Best is None too Good for a 

Gillcspie-Kinports Party" 



Personally Escorted Tours 

Round the World, Japan and China, South America, 
Europe Sec our Swiss Tours, Mediterranean 
Cruises, Alaska and California, Florida, Nova Scotia, 
Saguenay, Bermuda, Etc. 

Independent All-expenses Tours to all 
parts of America. 

Independent Steamship Reservations on all 
Lines at Tariff Rates. 



LOWEST PRICES 



Gillespie, Kinports & Beard 



NEW YORK 
59 West 37 Street 



PHILADELPHIA 
1115 Walnut Street 



Why Pay More? 



The World's Standard Timekeepe 




Travelers to Switzerland 

(iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiuii 

and Europe may secure in advance of their 
departure railway tickets, hotel accommoda- 
tion, guides, information, foreign exchange, 
American Express Travelers Cheques and 
all other travel and banking facilities from 
the American Express Company at: 



65 Broadway 

17 West 23rd Street 



11 8 West 39th Street 
2131 Broadway 

NEW YORK CITY 



or their Offices throughout the United States 

Canada, South America and the Far East. 

Offices in Lucerne, Zurich, Bale and in all 

principal cities of Europe. 



iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimimiii 



THE AMERICAN EXPRESS 
COMPANY 

are the General Agents in America for the 
Swiss Tourist Office, Zurich. 



To EUROPE ky 



To four generations of those who "go down to the sea in 
ships" the mighty Cucard Liners have fitly typified the 
Dominion of Man over the Sea. 

Magnificent floating hotel homes they are, affording the 
passenger in construction, equipment and service a conve- 
nience and luxury attained only through the accumulated 
experience of over eighty years. 

Always abreast, often ahead, of the times in the adoption 
of tested new devices or inventions to ensure the comfort 
and promote the pleasure of its clientele, the Cunard- Anchor 
Line is now pleased to announce that in the near future all 
its major ships will be equipped with the latest type of oil- 
burning engines. 

Apply 

CUNARD -ANCHOR 
STEAM SHIP LINES 

25 Broadway 
New York 

or Branches 
and Agencies 





my Character Sketches 

' Great AMERICAN Hotels 

Under the direction of 
L. M. Boomer 

JT is the object of tJiis 
group of hotels to make 
the stay of a guest so 
pleasant that, before it is 
at an end, a return visit 
is anticipated. To this 
aim every employee di- 
rects his service. 

WALDORF ASTORIA 

5//J Avenue at 34th Street, New York 

There are HO competitive aspirants for its 
prestige. It is unique. 

HOTEL McALPIN 

Broadway at 34th Street, New York 

A fifteen million dollar hotel without osten- 
tation. 

HOTEJ, CLARIDGE 

Broadway at 44t',i Street, New York 

Dignity and comfort at the central point of 
New York's gaiety. 

BELLEVUE STRATFORD 

Broad and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 

After the first visit Philadelphia suggests only 
one hotel the Bellevue Stratford. 

THE NEW WILLARD 

Pennsylvania Ave. and F St., Washington, D. C. 
The preferred stopping place of experienced 
world travelers. 



Direct Route to Switzerland 



NEW YORK 



HAVRE 



PARIS 




Fast express train service from 
Paris to Berne, Interlaken, 
Basel, Zurich, Lucerne, St. 
v \ Moritz, Geneva, 

Lausanne, and to 
Milan, Vienna, the 
Italian Lakes, and 
other travel centers. 



Regular sailings from New 
York to Havre of famous 
French Line Steamers 

magnificent accommodations a celebrated cuisine every 

comfort and convenience. 



For details, apply to 

FRENCH LINE 

Compagnie Generale Transatlantique 

19 State Street New York 



Chicago New Orleans 
Philadelphia 



Boston Washington St. Louis 
Baltimore San Francisco 




The National Shawmut Bank 
of Boston 

Boston, U. S. A. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000 
SURPLUS and PROFITS $12,000,000 



Foreign and Domestic Banking 
of every description 

Letters of Credit Safe Deposit Vaults 

Correspondents 

LONDON: London Joint City & Midland Bank Ltd. 
PARIS: Morgan Harjes & Company. 
SWITZERLAND: Credit Suisse, Zurich, Bale, Geneva. 



hina (Sauare 



NEW YORK, 

Center * 
Great Jiotels 



Under the direction of JOHN 




Squa ork. 

Each hole? an Alad 
paiace of comfort, aoa- 
venience snd pleasure 
ured by the com- 





i Wocos. V 
Oppotite Grmnd Centra) Term! 



Srt>odwar at 73rd Street 
in the Riverside residential section 



PERSHINQ SQUARE HOTELS, NEW YORK 



Incomparable Independent and 
Personally Conducted Tours 

To 

Europe, The Passion Play, Battlefields, South 
America, South Sea Islands, California, 
Yellowstone Park, Honolulu, Canadian 
Rockies, Colorado Springs, Bermuda, West 
Indies, Bahamas, Cuba, Porto Rico, Florida, 
Great Lakes, Saguenay River, Canada, 
White, Adirondack and Berkshire Mountains, 
Atlantic City, Washington, Niagara Falls. 

Tickets, Tours Everywhere 
MOST COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAMS 

Select Parties Most Courteous Service 

STEAMSHIP TICKETS FOR ALL LINES 
CHOICE ACCOMMODATION STANDARD RATES 

Drafts Travelers Cheques Letters of Credit 
Foreign Exchange Bought and Sold 

Send for literature desired 

THE GLOBE TOURS 

249 West 34 th Street :: New York, N. Y. 

Phone Longacre 2730 

Representatives Throughout the World 




^FRIENDS IN 
EVERY CLIME 

from Switzerland 

to 
Florida- 

In any climate 
In any emergency 

TRAVELERS* 

A'B-A A A SL Cheques 

are trustworthy 
traveling companions. 



facts about A. B. A. Cheques 

universally used by travelers and 
accepted as money in every land. 

your countersignature in presence 
of acceptor identifies you. 

safe to have on the person because 
they cannot be used until they have 
been countersigned by the original 
holder 

safer than money, and frequently 
more convenient than Letters of 
Credit because the bearer is less de- 
pendent on banking hours. 

issued by banks everywhere in de- 
nominations of $10, $20. $50 ana $100. 
compact, easy to carry, handy to use. 

oAsk for them at your bank 
or write for particulars to 

BANKERS TRUST COMPANY 
New York City 




GREATEST SEA MONARCHS 




A notable addition to the famous fleet of the White Star Line will be the splendid 
S. S. MAJESTIC, 56,000 tons, the largest ship in the world, also the new S. S. 
Homeric, a 35,000 ton giant, both in service next Spring. 

WHITE STAR LINE : 

New York Cherbourg Southampton. 
MAJESTIC OLYMPIC HOMERIC 

New York to Liverpool : 
ADRIATIC BALTIC CEDRIC CELTIC 

RED STAR LINE: 

Plymouth Cherbourg Southampton 

LAPLAND FINLAND KROONLAND ZEELAND 

AMERICAN LINE: 

New York to Hamburg 

MANCHURIA MONGOLIA MINNEKAHDA 

^atWHiTE STAR LINEST 



INTERNATIONAL MERCANTILE MARINE COMPANY 

9 BROADWAY NEW YORK 



INTENDING VISITORS TO 
SWITZERLAND CAN OB- 
TAIN EXPERT ADVICE 
AND RELIABLE INFORMA- 
TION FROM THE OFFICIAL 
AGENCIES OF THE 



SWISS FEDERAL 
RAILWAYS 



IN 



NEW YORK 241 FIFTH AVENUE 

LONDON 11B REGENT STREET. S.W. 1. 

PARIS 20 RUE LAFAYETTE 



COMPLIMENTARY BOOKLETS AND MAPS 
ON APPLICATION 



We prepare sales campaigns and place adver- 
tising in all publications at publishers' rates. 

ALSO ANALYZE MARKETS, 
SUGGEST NEW METHODS OF 
PRESENTATIONS, WRITE COPY 
AND MAKE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Many prominent advertisers are our clients 
including the 

SWISS FEDERAL RAILROADS 



Correspondence Invited 

Redfield Advertising Agency, Inc. 

34 West 33rd Street, New York 



BROWN BROTHERS & CO. 

Established 1818 

4th 8C Chestnut Sts. 60 State St. 

PHILADELPHIA 5 9 Walt St., NEW YORK BOSTON 



Travelers Letters of Credit 

O""|UR Travelers Letters of Credit have 
I been in use nearly 75 years and are 
well known in every banking center 
as well as in the more remote places 
of the world. Travelers to Switzerland 
who hold these credentials may cash their 
drafts at any of the important banks in that 
country. An illustrated booklet describing 
these Letters will be sent upon request. 

Jl Century of Service 



BROWN, SHIPLEY & COMPANY 

Established 1810 

Founders Court, Lothbury Office for Travelers 

LONDON, E. C. 12* Pall Mall, LONDON, S.W. 



MARSTERS' TOURS 



F 
O 
R 
B 
I 
G 
N 

A 

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I 

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A 

N 



TRAVEL 




U 
N 
D 
E 
R 
E 
S 
C 
O 
R 
T 

I 

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D 
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P 
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D 
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N 
T 



:ectory, Etc. FREE on Application to 




GEO. 

BOSTON 

248 Washington St. 



MARSTERS, inc. 

NEW YORK 
1123 Broadway 



COME AND SEE 

SWITZERLAND 

THE WORLD'S PLAYGROUND 

THE PARADISE OF SUMMER AND 

WINTER SPORTS IN THE 

CLEAR, BRACING 

ALPINE 

AIR 



all information 
concerning Railway 
services, Trips, Tours, 
Spring, Summer, Aut- 
umn and Winter re- 
sorts, Baths and Sana- 
toria, Sports, and 
Amusements, official 
and private Schools, 
artistic Curiosities, 
etc. apply to 



THE SWISS TOURIST INFORMATION OFFICE 
ZURICH AND LAUSANNE, THE AGENCIES OF 
THE SWISS FEDERAL RAILWAYS LONDON, 
NEW-YORK AND PARIS, AND ALL TRAVEL 
AGENCIES THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 



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